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Old 10-12-2019, 11:28 AM   #26
itlksez
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this is awesome, looks like quality fabrication work!
Thanks man!
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Old 10-12-2019, 11:28 AM   #27
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Air box is done. Glad thatís behind me.

The left half of the unit bolts to the firewall, and the right half bolts to the left half using three wingnut-headed bolts (wingbolts?).
Air filter cartridge replacement is tool-less.

I had to make those sections of tubing out of sheet stock. PITA.



The sealing ring weld needed to be coped to get a good seal against the filter. Another PITA.



Assembled:



Installed:



View from the engine bay. I had to pipe it out where I previously had the coil. I think the coil will now get mounted to the center air box stud.

Iíll wait to think about the intake tube routing through the engine bay until itís all assembled. I might actually bring it through the upper inside corner of the fender.

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Old 10-13-2019, 05:14 PM   #28
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I got the clutch cable hooked up. Pull is stiff, but travel distance is dead on. Feels like friction more than a leverage issue. I’m thinking it will ease up some when I grease the pedal pivot.





I still need to hook up the return spring (bottom hole on the pivot arm). It’ll get welded up next time the body is off.

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Old 10-13-2019, 09:43 PM   #29
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Awesome fabrication skills man. Loving the updates, I’ll be watching this one!
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Old 10-13-2019, 11:01 PM   #30
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Awesome fabrication skills man. Loving the updates, Iíll be watching this one!
Thanks!

Spokane! Howdy from right across the border!
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Old 10-14-2019, 12:05 AM   #31
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Thanks!

Spokane! Howdy from right across the border!
Oh dang. I didnít see youíre in Post Falls! Only about 25 minutes away.
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Old 10-14-2019, 09:28 AM   #32
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I love the attention to details and the fab work. It's impressive.
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Old 10-15-2019, 12:34 PM   #33
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Thanks matt b!


Body is back off. Brake lines are next.

I have the brake failure sensor from the Volvo... might as well use it!

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Old 10-15-2019, 01:18 PM   #34
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Holy ****.
Talk about some serious fab skills.
Kudos.
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Old 10-15-2019, 06:50 PM   #35
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awesome craftmanship. I am a jeep guy too. Used to go with my uncle in enduros back in the day.Looking forward to see the finished product.
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Old 10-15-2019, 08:14 PM   #36
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This thread has decidedly killed any of my daydreams about repowering the neighbors Willys plow truck that I'm trying to annex.
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Old 10-15-2019, 08:46 PM   #37
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Thanks guys!

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This thread has decidedly killed any of my daydreams about repowering the neighbors Willys plow truck that I'm trying to annex.
Why did this kill your dreams? You mean it MOTIVATED you!!

I love your pickup build! I try not to let your husky cloud my opinions of you too much.



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Old 10-16-2019, 01:06 AM   #38
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Doing some repairs to our CJ5 this winter. Maybe will plan a roadtrip to come visit next summer and check out /compare the two, might be fun
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Old 10-16-2019, 08:33 AM   #39
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Doing some repairs to our CJ5 this winter. Maybe will plan a roadtrip to come visit next summer and check out /compare the two, might be fun
I look forward to it! What year?
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Old 10-16-2019, 08:49 AM   #40
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Why did this kill your dreams? You mean it MOTIVATED you!!

I love your pickup build! I try not to let your husky cloud my opinions of you too much.
haha, maybe if I can get my dad roped into it! We do get bored during the winters. It's a real field rat but something really cool about it. I'll try to find a pic and post it, no idea what year it is maybe you guys can narrow it down.

and thanks, the pickup is a fun project! And I love my fake swedish KTM thank you very much
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Old 10-16-2019, 10:54 AM   #41
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I look forward to it! What year?
1980
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Old 10-16-2019, 01:55 PM   #42
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Could you explain your approach on the M45 to transfer case torque tube? I'm wondering how you kept them coaxial and made the torque tube just the right length. Did you have an alignment tolerance in mind or did you fixture it and weld it and called it good?
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Old 10-16-2019, 03:14 PM   #43
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Could you explain your approach on the M45 to transfer case torque tube? I'm wondering how you kept them coaxial and made the torque tube just the right length. Did you have an alignment tolerance in mind or did you fixture it and weld it and called it good?
Thanks for the interest.

The splined stub shaft (that is at the center of it all) floats. It has about 1/16" that it can move in/out on the transmission end, and it could go in the female end of the t-case as far as it wanted, so my length measurement wasn't as critical as you might think. As long as I left a small gap between the female collars for a bit of tolerance, it was good. I just measured that with a tape measure to the nearest 1/16".

Cutting the tube square on both ends was the most critical of all. Without a proper lathe, I had to rely on a roll of aluminum flashing I had here for the mark. I taped the flashing to the tube and wrapped it tightly around the tube a few times. As long as the flashing is wrapping evenly, it is making a square edge. I used an engraver to mark the edge of the flashing, then spun it around to do the other end. I cut the tube with a cutoff wheel, and I fine tuned it with a grinder and a machinist's square. That part took hours to get it perfect.

As far as getting it to align perfectly side to side, I'm lucky that the D300 t-case has a removable input bearing assembly. I was able to use that as an alignment tool. I machined the collar to accept the indexing ring, welded that into the adapter, then dropped the bearing assembly on top of the adapter. This aligned everything perfectly. (Pic below.) I clamped everything tight and welded it up.

After it was all welded, I noticed there was still a little play between the steel adapter and the aluminum M45 bearing retainer when the bolts were loose, so I centered it where the stub shaft had free play with the least resistance, and I drilled two holes through the plates and drove in some split pins as centering pins.

Keep in mind this is all still just theory at this point. It might be way off and have a glorious catastrophic failure in the first five miles. At that point, I'll be adapting a Jeep T5 to the B230.


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Old 10-17-2019, 01:35 PM   #44
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I finally got the hard lines on the frame finished today.

I went about my brake setup a little unconventionally. Using the Volvo MC, I blocked off one front and one rear circuit, and I’ll run the remaining 2 lines to the brake failure sensor as a junction block. From there, the two circuits split to feed the LF/RR wheels, and the RF/LR wheels.

The front Toyota calipers are 4-piston monsters, and the rear Isuzu Rodeo calipers are single-piston. The difference in piston surface area *should negate the need for a proportioning valve.

So, from the sensor, I ran two lines front and two lines to their opposing back sides.



Through the frame holes made for this...



And back around the muffler to two separate rubber lines.

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Old 10-17-2019, 02:55 PM   #45
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Impressive fabrication, wish you lived next door to me
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Old 10-17-2019, 09:53 PM   #46
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Impressive fabrication, wish you lived next door to me
Heís kinda my neighbor...

Looking good. The brake lines look great, cleanly routed.
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Old 10-17-2019, 09:58 PM   #47
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Thanks guys!

Anything you need.
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Old 10-19-2019, 02:41 AM   #48
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I cut the tube with a cutoff wheel, and I fine tuned it with a grinder and a machinist's square. That part took hours to get it perfect.
Welcome to the understatement of the year.

Wow. This is phenomenal, every aspect of it. Your fab skills put mine to shame, yet I also admit that I've never done this much metal work. What I see here is how my brain works with wood. Maybe someday I'll switch gears. In that sense, you are an inspiration, though it's daunting to contemplate.

This is either incredibly well thought out, or you've not bothered to show us all the trial and error. Or maybe a bit of both. That air filter box is stronger than most body structures. I never would have thought of bringing the mass air into the cab, but I'll bet any electronics removed from underhood heat are bound to last longer. The mounts, cradle and crossmembers are works of art, the overhead sway bar is brilliant, the pedal box mounted upside down is hillarious. If that clutch cable doesn't feel better with grease, you could always adapt an over-center spring mechanism from a VW/Audi or BMW.

Love the 4-piston calipers, they're awesome compared to pin sliders, and I think you're probably correct about the proportioning valve calculation. The only place where that decision might bite you is if you have varying amounts of cargo weight, but there isn't exactly a lot of room for cargo anyway. If you ever need something adjustable based on body height, look at the valve on the rear axle of a Chrysler minivan. Brake lines are cunifer? I'm guessing only based on the color. Did you find that they form easily (fittings and such)?

Lemme get this straight. No room for air intake plumbing or ignition coil or sway bars or much of anything else, probably not even to get your fingers in there for repairs, yet you're leaving room for a turbo?? You're completely insane. Holy crap I love that. Can't wait to see what else you've got up your sleeve.

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Iím *originally from that area. I moved to Idaho 16 years ago and miss nothing but the... well, nothing really.
Indeed, how fondly I recall my time in the salt belt.
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Old 10-19-2019, 09:44 AM   #49
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What I see here is how my brain works with wood. Maybe someday I'll switch gears.
Iím a cabinetmaker by trade, so itís entirely possible.

Thanks for the kind words, Toybox.

Quote:
This is either incredibly well thought out, or you've not bothered to show us all the trial and error. Or maybe a bit of both.
Definitely both. This thread is obviously the CliffsNotes of the build. I have an in-depth build thread over on EarlyCJ5.com, if anyone is interested. Iím pretty sure non-members can see it. I try to be forthcoming with all the good and the bad in that thread, along with the thought processes that went into it along the way. It was originally going to be a fairly straightforward restomod to take the kids for ice cream.
Varg in Jeepís Clothing

I had to google cunifer brake line. Iíve only ever heard it called nickel-copper or Nicopp. Yes, itís what Iím using, and itís awesome. Iím so used to breaking the flare fittings with steel lines, I bought a few extra ones heading into this project, and I havenít broken any. The price is the only drawback. I got my roll from Summit and came up a few feet short. Now itís either buy another roll from Summit, or buy the short pieces I need from my local parts place for the same price. Ouch.

Thanks for the heads up with the minivan proportioning valve. My dadís Ď66 IH pickup had one of them; I had it in mind as a last resort. Good to know of a more modern source.
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Old 10-19-2019, 09:53 AM   #50
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Hereís one of those trial and errors...

I built the front axle years ago without the calipers installed. I threw them on the other morning and found that the inlet port dumps really close to the steering arm. Iím not sure Iíll be able to fit the hose in there without using a 90į fitting and shooting it up toward the top knuckle pivot.

Itís hard to tell in the pic, but the edge of the arm easily clears the hole, but the arm is angled. A rubber hose would have definite contact.

Itís irritating, because caliper removal after the brake line is on will either require arm removal or line removal.



Pic of the front hard lines roughed in.



I decided to try banjo bolts in the ports that normally use inverted flare fittings.

I researched the threads/pitch I needed for these banjo bolts (m10x1) and located a part number through O'Reillyís website. I called them, and they had two of them within 2 hours. They were $4 each. Awesome! Picked them up that night.

I had to machine the faces of these caliper ports flat for the banjo fittings to seal. They were pitted badly and uneven. I hit them with some sandpaper just to see what I was working with...



I made a tool out of a flare fitting, two washers and some sandpaper. I cranked down on the fitting and turned the big washer. It took a few pieces of sandpaper to get them to enough bare metal to seal, but it made a nice perpendicular cut.





Then I had to cut a big chunk out of the steering arm for the new fitting and hose to pass for removal. Oversight fixed! Iíll have some custom hoses made up when I get a funds refill.

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