home register FAQ memberlist calendar

Go Back   Turbobricks Forums > Mechanical > maintenance & nonperformance

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-28-2017, 05:03 PM   #1
VolvoNutt
K-jet Newbie
 
VolvoNutt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Colorado
Default Has Anyone Used this Oil?

Has anyone used Schaeffer oil? Several shops in the area swear by them and I’m just curious if anyone has had any experience with their products?

They have a varied and extensive line of lube products, seems their engine oil is pretty high grade, at least from a novice reading up that is.
__________________
VolvoNutt is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2017, 05:13 PM   #2
dl242gt
Can play the blues
 
dl242gt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: S NJ, a suburb of Phila.
Default

I heard about them either here or on the brickboard. I haven't tried their products but I did enjoy the information on their site. Looks like very good products.
__________________
Dave,
1982 242 turbo. 339k miles. Lots of good changes.
1993 245 Classic, 415k miles, enem V15. 5spd. IPD bars and chassis braces. Simons sport exhaust from Scandix. chipped ezk. Been a good road warrior.
dl242gt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2017, 06:08 PM   #3
90volvo
Board Member
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: Eldorado Springs Mo.
Default

I had a friend that worked at a raceshop. They ran schaffer in all the race engines. They claimed it ran low temps on the dyno.
90volvo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2017, 02:06 PM   #4
sjulier
Board Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Hamden CT
Default

Schaefer is a superb oil. If I could get it as easily as Rotella I would use it.

Sam
sjulier is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-2017, 09:46 PM   #5
84B23F
Board Member
 
84B23F's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Kansas, USA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dn240 View Post
Has anyone used Schaeffer oil?
Secret - If rings are still fit for duty on older engines, change oil/filter every 2-4k; 2k for city, and 4k for longer runs above 30 mph....real mileage between stops.
84B23F is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-2017, 10:33 PM   #6
John V, outside agitator
Board Member
 
John V, outside agitator's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Sleezattle, WA, USA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by 84B23F View Post
Secret - If rings are still fit for duty on older engines, change oil/filter every 2-4k; 2k for city, and 4k for longer runs above 30 mph....real mileage between stops.
Yeah sure...Doesn't matter if every couple of years the API comes out with new harder and harder tests and that the oil in the 90s was better in every respect than the oil in the 80s and that the oil in the OOs is better than in the 90s and that OEMs say change at 6000 or 7000...
NO! What do they know anyway?
What does the fact that even with normal casual service intervals that motors can go 200,000 mile easily (once carbs were dumped) and O2 sensors kept mixtures nice even in cold-start reducing bore wear and oil dilution..FORGET all that>>

We should listen instead to THE OIL COMPANY's AD Departments!

That's where the truth will be found..

And they're on your side, too..To make it easier change you oil they all own chain stores of quick oil change shops where you can do your oil changes twice and even 3 times more frequently that the Engine manufacturers reccomend>>and while waiting you can read their ads and feel reassured you'redoing the right thing and not mindlessly wasting money..

Then you engine will run 600 THOUSAND miles on the bottom end..

Too bad about the things that wear out from cycles, the reciprocating parts...

ANY price is worth it to save those $67 main bearings and 45 buck rod bearings...
__________________
John Vanlandingham/JVAB Imports
Sleezattle WA, USA

--> CALL (206) 431-9696<----

www.rallyrace.net/jvab

www.rallyanarchy.com

Vive le Prole-le-ralliat

"When a man tells you that he got rich through hard work, ask him: 'Whose?'"
— Don Marquis
John V, outside agitator is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2017, 03:16 PM   #7
Mr. V
Board Member
 
Mr. V's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Portland, Oregon metro
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by John V, outside agitator View Post
ANY price is worth it to save those $67 main bearings and 45 buck rod bearings...
Are you advocating infrequent oil changes, e.g. in line with car mfr. recommendations?
Mr. V is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2017, 03:24 PM   #8
jerryc
Board Member
 
jerryc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: SF Bay area
Default

When I had a small shop the recommendations were to change oil at 3k. 40 years later with all the oil improvements, to many the rec is Still every 3k. Yeah, it's advertising.
I change mine now at 5-6k, on all my B230's.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ursan View Post
What's the female equivalent to a dick pic? twat shot?
Quote:
Originally Posted by XxJenoxX View Post
There isn't one because dudes aren't grossed out by unsolicited vaginas.
jerryc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2017, 03:48 PM   #9
Bobbyz
Board Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Park Rapids MN
Default

Love that post John V !

I was telling someone the other day the factory recommend oil change on my daily driver is 15,000 miles. He about had a cow! The manufacturer is totally wrong and whatever.
Yeah what would British Motor Works know about engines or that cheap synthetic oil they recommend?
I think based on this guy's expertise I'll change it every 2,500 miles, I mean what do I know, I thought BMW was a German company. . . .

Really want to get one of those stuck in that past guys going? Tell them about semi truck fleets that run oil over 200,000 miles. Simply install an after market bypass filtration system, change that filter at about 15,000 miles and send the oil off for analysis. Run it tell it tests bad.
Do the math on a truck with a million mile service life, that holds 10 gallons of oil, based on the old school 10,000 mile changes. Now don't forget that those fleets know full well if an engine goes down it'll easily cost $40 to $50,000 between replacement, towing and down time. If more frequent oil changes were cheaper in the long run, they'd change it more frequently.
Bobbyz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2017, 11:24 AM   #10
84B23F
Board Member
 
84B23F's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Kansas, USA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by John V, outside agitator View Post
Yeah sure......
Caveat - "older engines"

Which generally have more blow-by than a new engine.

Yes, oils have gotten better, but more frequent oil changes will insure a long life.

Penny wise, pound foolish...
84B23F is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2017, 11:51 AM   #11
John V, outside agitator
Board Member
 
John V, outside agitator's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Sleezattle, WA, USA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by 84B23F View Post
Caveat - "older engines"

Which generally have more blow-by than a new engine.

Yes, oils have gotten better, but more frequent oil changes will insure a long life.

Penny wise, pound foolish...
Truthiness again and obviously for you that is what counts, and you're right..

http://www.cc.com/video-clips/63ite2...d---truthiness


John V, outside agitator is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2017, 11:59 AM   #12
84B23F
Board Member
 
84B23F's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Kansas, USA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by John V, outside agitator View Post
Truthiness again and obviously for you that is what counts, and you're right.....
On two 2.8 V6 GM engines, like after 150k miles, 300k total on each, both are still fit for duty, without oil consumption issue.

One thing is for certain, with frequent oil/filter changes, on older engines, less wear will occur than with OEM interval.
84B23F is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2017, 12:04 PM   #13
84B23F
Board Member
 
84B23F's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Kansas, USA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by John V, outside agitator View Post
that is what counts
I've never seen a magazine article devoted to older engines...its always about new engines.

When are they going to address blow-by?
84B23F is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2017, 12:18 PM   #14
John V, outside agitator
Board Member
 
John V, outside agitator's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Sleezattle, WA, USA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by 84B23F View Post
I've never seen a magazine article devoted to older engines...its always about new engines.

When are they going to address blow-by?
Well find a OLD magazine, then you can gert the same effect..I feel that will be equivalent..
And if you watch the clip you'll see that is the important thing..
John V, outside agitator is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2017, 01:46 PM   #15
84B23F
Board Member
 
84B23F's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Kansas, USA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by John V, outside agitator View Post
Well find .
Someone who does a $20 oil analysis, for each oil change, or increase the oil change interval:-)
84B23F is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2017, 12:23 PM   #16
sjulier
Board Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Hamden CT
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by 84B23F View Post
Caveat - "older engines"

Which generally have more blow-by than a new engine.

Yes, oils have gotten better, but more frequent oil changes will insure a long life.

Penny wise, pound foolish...
Amen brother. My 89 740 went to 336k with Kendall GT-1 10W30, 3-4K OCI. I'd still be driving it had it not saved me in an accident.

Sam
sjulier is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2017, 04:49 PM   #17
84B23F
Board Member
 
84B23F's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Kansas, USA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sjulier View Post
My 89 740 went to 336k with Kendall GT-1 10W30, 3-4K
The only way oils can be compared, is to do oil analysis tests, which may run upwards to $30.00/test.

We do it all the time on farm diesel equipment (semi-trucks, tractors, combines), every oil change.

Today's gasoline oils are much better, but the topic of handling blow-by gases on older engines is not discussed in the articles I've seen. Most likely, some oils are better than others.

I know from experience, that some oils will slip by the rings-or disappear-quicker than other oils.

I've used "natural gas" oil before, 10w30 Pennzoil Platinum® High Mileage, and it seemed to be better.

March 7, 2014 - Natural gas by the quart: Shell's new oil isn't crude

Royal Dutch Shell, which owns Pennzoil, Quaker State and other brands, is announcing Friday that it has already started selling a premium motor oil that is derived from natural gas and not crude


PENNZOIL PLATINUM

SAE 0W-20
SAE 5W-20
SAE 5W-30
SAE 10W-30
Racing SAE 10W-60

Here is a comparison of Pennzoil Lubrication Oils
84B23F is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2017, 05:20 PM   #18
John V, outside agitator
Board Member
 
John V, outside agitator's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Sleezattle, WA, USA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by 84B23F View Post
The only way oils can be compared, is to do oil analysis tests, which may run upwards to $30.00/test.

We do it all the time on farm diesel equipment (semi-trucks, tractors, combines), every oil change.

Today's gasoline oils are much better, but the topic of handling blow-by gases on older engines is not discussed in the articles I've seen. Most likely, some oils are better than others.

I know from experience, that some oils will slip by the rings-or disappear-quicker than other oils.

I've used "natural gas" oil before, 10w30 Pennzoil Platinum® High Mileage, and it seemed to be better.

March 7, 2014 - Natural gas by the quart: Shell's new oil isn't crude

Royal Dutch Shell, which owns Pennzoil, Quaker State and other brands, is announcing Friday that it has already started selling a premium motor oil that is derived from natural gas and not crude


PENNZOIL PLATINUM

SAE 0W-20
SAE 5W-20
SAE 5W-30
SAE 10W-30
Racing SAE 10W-60

Here is a comparison of Pennzoil Lubrication Oils
Blow-by is primarily a function of ring side clearance in the top ring groove....and that is a function of the weight of the ring and how hard it rams into the top and bottom of the groove every single time the piston changes direction, and how hard it hits for a given weight depends on how fast it is going M x V..and how many times it has banged into the top and bottom..
In short, cycles..

No2 ring is primarily an oil control ring and No3 is all oil control.. so we see the job falls to No1..The side clearance is important because the only way the ring can do its job or a) making compression and b) controlling blow-by is if the face of the ring is held absolutely flat against the cylinder wall..

If the groove is worn--as a natural function of cycles---then the ring doesn't get held flat against the cylinder wall: it flops kinda like a windshield wiper blade..And a little wedge appears from the face to cylinderwall...and the 70-80 bar of combustion pressure will "see" the face of the ring and push that ring right back into the groove and blow tight on by.

Oil has nothing to do with it..Weight, velocity material, and cycles.

Have you noticed over the decades how top rings have gone skinnier and skinnier and skinnier over the decades as engine speeds have gone up? On some motors from around 5mm down to 1,5mm?

Rod and main bearing clearance and top ring side clearance are three of the most absolutely critical numbers in any motor, but of those three, ring side clearance is the most inflexible.( rod amd main clearance has a MUCH wider range of acceptable clearance.. ..
0015" is fine, but 002 is Ok and depending on usage sometmes even .003" is fine-depending..

But there is no way around the hard fact that the ring must be square against the cylinder wall or you will have blow-by.
John V, outside agitator is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2017, 09:29 PM   #19
sjulier
Board Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Hamden CT
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by John V, outside agitator View Post
Blow-by is primarily a function of ring side clearance in the top ring groove....and that is a function of the weight of the ring and how hard it rams into the top and bottom of the groove every single time the piston changes direction, and how hard it hits for a given weight depends on how fast it is going M x V..and how many times it has banged into the top and bottom..
In short, cycles..

No2 ring is primarily an oil control ring and No3 is all oil control.. so we see the job falls to No1..The side clearance is important because the only way the ring can do its job or a) making compression and b) controlling blow-by is if the face of the ring is held absolutely flat against the cylinder wall..

If the groove is worn--as a natural function of cycles---then the ring doesn't get held flat against the cylinder wall: it flops kinda like a windshield wiper blade..And a little wedge appears from the face to cylinderwall...and the 70-80 bar of combustion pressure will "see" the face of the ring and push that ring right back into the groove and blow tight on by.

Oil has nothing to do with it..Weight, velocity material, and cycles.

Have you noticed over the decades how top rings have gone skinnier and skinnier and skinnier over the decades as engine speeds have gone up? On some motors from around 5mm down to 1,5mm?

Rod and main bearing clearance and top ring side clearance are three of the most absolutely critical numbers in any motor, but of those three, ring side clearance is the most inflexible.( rod amd main clearance has a MUCH wider range of acceptable clearance.. ..
0015" is fine, but 002 is Ok and depending on usage sometmes even .003" is fine-depending..

But there is no way around the hard fact that the ring must be square against the cylinder wall or you will have blow-by.
I learned a lot from this explanation. Thanks.

Sam
sjulier is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2017, 09:33 PM   #20
John V, outside agitator
Board Member
 
John V, outside agitator's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Sleezattle, WA, USA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sjulier View Post
I learned a lot from this explanation. Thanks.

Sam
Thanks for reading it..In this tweet obsessed, whiny millennial coddling world, so many say "tooooo long" so didn't read.

Not everything can be made sense of in one or two lines.
John V, outside agitator is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2017, 09:59 PM   #21
sjulier
Board Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Hamden CT
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by John V, outside agitator View Post
Thanks for reading it..In this tweet obsessed, whiny millennial coddling world, so many say "tooooo long" so didn't read.

Not everything can be made sense of in one or two lines.
My take away from this discussion is that the B230F is not a long oil drain engine. 5k with M1 10W30 HM (API SM), 4K with Rotella T5, 3k with an API SN 10W30 is about right. This is what I've always done and the cars have lasted forever. On the other hand our 2007 V70 2.4 can go 7,500 and have nearly no wear in a UOA report with a much lighter color used oil.

Sam
sjulier is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2017, 12:19 AM   #22
84B23F
Board Member
 
84B23F's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Kansas, USA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by John V, outside agitator View Post
Blow-by is primarily a function of ring side clearance in the top ring groove...No2 ring is primarily an oil control ring and No3 is all oil control.. so we see the job falls to No1.

Oil has nothing to do with it..Weight, velocity material, and cycles.
Oh, so they quick using SAE50 Motor Oil at Tricky Dick's used car lot?

If second and third ring are crusted over with hard deposits, then number one gets creamed. That's the way my 84-B23F was before I re-ringed it. It happens to millions of lawn mowers when owners don't change oil frequently also; many times, these engines can be re-ringed when sludged rings exist.
84B23F is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2017, 09:58 PM   #23
84B23F
Board Member
 
84B23F's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Kansas, USA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by John V, outside agitator View Post
Yeah sure...
..
These newer oils have much better "detergents," which may/can assist in cleaning oil-fouled oil-rings.

My 245 was bought from a university graduate, who drove short miles, and "saved" on less frequent oil changes. It's oil consumption sucked, but I decreased it overtime via frequent oil changes..it still consumes oil, but not as much now.


.
84B23F is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2017, 10:31 PM   #24
John V, outside agitator
Board Member
 
John V, outside agitator's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Sleezattle, WA, USA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by 84B23F View Post
Oh, so they quick using SAE50 Motor Oil at Tricky Dick's used car lot?

If second and third ring are crusted over with hard deposits, then number one gets creamed. That's the way my 84-B23F was before I re-ringed it. It happens to millions of lawn mowers when owners don't change oil frequently also; many times, these engines can be re-ringed when sludged rings exist.
Crusted over?
Have you ever rebuilt correctly a car engine?
John V, outside agitator is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2017, 10:32 AM   #25
KeizerBrickGuy
Sh*t pot stirrer
 
KeizerBrickGuy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Keizer, OR
Default

From what I've heard, it is good oil. But for our long-life, nearly indestructible engines and cars, any oil will do. I am currently running M1 0W40 Euro oil in both my bricks and haven't noticed any additional consumption. Go with what works for you, but doesn't make you cringe every time you have to complete a PM task.
__________________
-Stephen
Quote:
Originally Posted by 87_240TURBO View Post
#mclovethesenuts

-My car: White 1991 244, 308k miles. B230F LH2.4, AW70, R134a retro. Thrush glasspack, anthracite refinished Coronas
-Wife's car: White 1990 244DL, T cam, 190k miles.B230F LH2.4, AW70 w/aux cooler, Duracool AC w/condenser fan, purple refinished Virgos, tow hitch, ipd wagon overload springs.
-PSM 2002 Subaru WRX wagon: 120k miles, Perrin TBE, Perrin turbo inlet, intake, and Y-pipe, GrimmSpeed cross pipe.
Rebuilding EJ207 shortblock to swap in this summer.
KeizerBrickGuy is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:32 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.