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Old 05-25-2016, 10:42 AM   #51
cwdodson88
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Yeah, the shape is nearly identical, the depth is where the cr differs. But the difference between the b18 and b20, look at how far the chamber is from the fire ring.
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Old 05-26-2016, 11:52 AM   #52
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Screen Shot 2016-05-25 at 1.46.17 PM

Have started researching the effects of supercharger boost on an engine and at what point detonation occurs without using a boost ignition retard device.

The chart shows the effective compression ratio of an engine, which combines the static compression ratio with the amount of supercharger boost. For most street applications with 93 octane pump gas the effective compression ratio needs to be kept below about 12.0:1

In my case if I go this route I need to shoot for 8.5:1 or lower as at six-seven psi of boost the Judson Supercharger puts out the effective compression ratio is 12.0:1 - 12.5:1

Even a B18B head with a CR Of 8.7:1 it will need to be lowered by making the combustion chamber larger.

Maybe if go this way, at the same time I will install larger valves and hard valve seats and port the head a bit.

Does anyone here know what size of larger valves will work well for a B18 head and where do the ports need to be changed keeping in mind this will be street driven?

Has anyone here put a supercharger or a turbo on a B18 w/a B/18 head? What were your experiences?
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Old 05-26-2016, 12:47 PM   #53
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B18's use 11/32" valves and a single groove keeper. Conversion guides are available to allow the use of 5/16" B20 valves with 2 groove keepers. Oversize stainless steel valves are readily available as are hardened keepers.

If you can find one, early B18A/B18D heads are 8.5:1.
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Old 05-27-2016, 09:54 AM   #54
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B18's use 11/32" valves and a single groove keeper. Conversion guides are available to allow the use of 5/16" B20 valves with 2 groove keepers. Oversize stainless steel valves are readily available as are hardened keepers.

If you can find one, early B18A/B18D heads are 8.5:1.
Thanks!!
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Old 05-30-2016, 05:25 PM   #55
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Judson Supercharger 1

I have been to busy with customers cars lately, but managed to clean up all of the Judson Supercharger parts and give it a good inspection. I bought it all apart but it is 99% complete and is only missing a few common fasteners. It only needs a routine rebuild with new bearings, seals, and gaskets, but I will need to machine a new set of fiber vanes for it which is not that big of a deal.

This set of photos gives you a very good idea of how it is constructed and what all of the parts look like. To get a better idea of how it all works take a look at the first post in this thread which explains it.

This pales in comparison to the modern turbos and controls many of you are installing, but is going on a 1968 122s Wagon (the shop truck) that is being modified with only bolt on high performance vintage pieces from the 1960s and early-1970s. When installed (takes 3-4 hrs) on a stock engine with no other changes it is capable of a 30% HP increase and the engine should put out about 150 HP with the added 6-7 psi boost.

Judson Supercharger 2

Judson Supercharger 3

The carburetor is a simple one-barrel Holley unit that was used on 220 ci six cylinder cars and trucks in the 1950s and early sixties that is more than big enough for the 108.5 ci B18. It is not very sophisticated (in fact with the glass float bowl it looks like a toilet mechanism), but will serve well after a rebuild to get the system set up and running and have a base line to compare to future changes.

Judson Supercharger 4

Judson Supercharger 5

jud

Judson Supercharger 6

Judson Supercharger 7

Judson Supercharger 9

The drive end of the aluminum rotor and shaft. The rotors were precision balanced at 10K RPM.

Judson Supercharger 10

The crank and blower pulleys.

Below is all of the original throttle linkage, the belt, the blower lubricator, and even the air cleaner.

Judson Supercharger 12

Last edited by vintagewrench; 05-31-2016 at 01:21 PM..
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Old 07-13-2016, 11:37 AM   #56
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Summer has been super busy here in the shop getting client's vintage racing cars ready to run at events at both Indy and Milwaukee, rebuilding a 1914 Simplex 4-cyl. 600 ci engine and trying to get a little time in here and there on the Volvo.

The new micarta vanes for the supercharger are finally finished, and you can see them above in the aluminum rotor, mocked up in about the same location in the housing bore that it rotates in (there is clearance below it).

The assembly rotates clockwise, and the right-hand vane is shown about five degrees before it starts to pull in the fuel and air charge from the portion of the aluminum manifold fed by the carburetor at atmospheric pressure. It then compresses it under the rotor; next as it rotates the vane slides out of the rotor slot via centrifugal force, lets the compressed mixture expand until it is forced out of the housing into the intake manifold at a maximum of 5-7 psi.



The intake mixture enters in the bottom half of the blower housing seen above through the diamond shaped openings. The compressed mixture exits through the top half into the intake manifold. The divider helps to equalize the flow to both the front and rear intake runners.



The new vanes above placed in the rotor. They are made of micarda, a tough thermosetting plastic and cloth composite that is the same material used for Volvo "fiber" camshaft gears. The slots assist in collecting the gas, air, and oil mixture to help lubricate the rotor slots and the sides of the vanes.



The housing bore and the rotating assembly will be lubricated by an Ampco "Vapor Lubricator"; this one is a brand new old stock unit. It injects a very fine mist of "Marvel Mystery Oil" or 10 weight oil through a spray nozzle into the carburetor venturi in the amount of about one drop very 4-6 seconds. After passing through the blower, it serves as a top end lube for the intake valve guides, intake valve and seat faces and the cylinder bores and rings.

New pressure-sensitive aluminum ID plate below for the front end of the supercharger housing.

Next up is to hone the ID of the blower housing on the shop Sunnen precision honing machine, in the same manner as a cylinder bore is done. Then detail everything, get new bearings and seals and reassemble it.


Last edited by vintagewrench; 07-13-2016 at 11:56 AM..
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Old 07-14-2016, 12:17 AM   #57
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It's all so damn beautiful
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Old 07-14-2016, 08:59 AM   #58
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It's all so damn beautiful
Billy,

Thanks, when I can fine the time I will share more of the rebuild.

Last edited by vintagewrench; 07-14-2016 at 02:36 PM..
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Old 07-14-2016, 11:06 AM   #59
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How cool
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Old 07-16-2016, 08:28 AM   #60
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How cool
Good to hear you like this retro system that is an alternative to turbos on pushrod red block B18's - Slowly making progress w/it. Will update when there is more to share.

I am looking for another one for another car if anyone knows where I can find one, PM me - Thanks

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Old 03-11-2017, 03:08 PM   #61
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Ah - Let the games begin. The original 1968 B18 115 hp engine w/a B20 FI F head and a later M41 trans and J-Type OD comes out for a rebuild of all three.

Oh - and the problems begin as soon as the cylinder head was removed!! The engine had been rebuilt about 20K miles ago (190K total on the engine) and was over bored to the B20 standard size and everything it looks near new inside. I was hoping it had close to the original bore size because the Judson supercharger which will go on it later is sized for 1800cc engines, and the cylinder wall thickness at this size is border line for a blower installation.

That leaves me with two choices: do a small clean up bore on the B18-B block and then sleeve it and bore it to a B18 standard bore size, or seeing as I am trying to keep this car as original as possible w/the exception of bolt on vintage speed and racing equipment, is too find another 1968 manual transmission block. This block is stamped 68 on the first of the two pads on the middle of the left hand side of the engine block, the second pad is the serial number. The first part of the number is 4968 which is cast on the block in front of both, the second number is the serial number.


Anyone out there that has such a bare block w/its original main caps in good condition that could save me from spending a lot of time w/my boring machine?

Last edited by vintagewrench; 03-12-2017 at 05:29 PM..
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Old 03-11-2017, 10:20 PM   #62
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FWIW: '68 parts car...

Drivetrain intact...


Still complete and in situ:
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Old 03-12-2017, 07:50 AM   #63
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Thanks, I was thinking about this car and you last week.

Do you have a source to double check Scandcar's engine prefix numbers of 68 for 1967 and 71 for 1968.

I will try to call you early this evening, or try me when if works for you today, I'll be in the shop working on the car.
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Old 03-12-2017, 10:07 AM   #64
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For 220 estate wagons only, all B18Bs (3rd digit #3):

P 22334=M40=496871
P 22336=BW35=72
P 22344=M40=71 UAR ... (UAR=without Emmission Control)
P 22344=M40=68 MAR ... (MAR=with EC)
P 22346=BW35=72 UAR
P 22346=BW35=69 MAR
P 22394=M40=61 UAR
P 22394=M40=69 MAR

Brrrrr, no?
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Old 03-27-2017, 03:03 PM   #65
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Decided to go with a B18 block bored out to a std. bore B20. A mock up engine and transmission went in the car yesterday to check the fit of the Judson Supercharger in the engine compartment, and the exhaust manifold, and for the installation of a 1800s trans tunnel and shifter.

The intake manifold will clear a single early single down tube pipe manifold, but not the later double pipe unit known for good bottom end torque. This car will be used daily on the street and also for a lot hill climbing. Later on it will be used for towing a lightweight vintage racing car to the track so I am looking for all the low end power I can get. An Isky Street Performance cam will be used.



Since headers are the only viable option available, the exact measurements of how far the center two pipes come out from the head to a 4-2 into 1 KR Trimmings type of header where marked under the intake manifold are needed.



Would also like to know if a header with the shorter primary pipes that merge together in a shorter Y-shape both on the inside and out like the Volvo Competition Services unit is available?



Also found a very rare never used circa 1962 Judson high-intensity coil with the instructions and decal.

And finally, I wish the 1800s transmission tunnel was as easy to install as the carpet for it but this gives you and idea of what it will look like and where the shifter will be.


Last edited by vintagewrench; 03-28-2017 at 09:52 AM..
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Old 03-27-2017, 03:11 PM   #66
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I have a KGTrimning 4:2:1 header on my PV, I'll try to get you a measurement on that tonight.

IPD has a header that has the shorter curves on the center cylinders: https://www.ipdusa.com/products/7014...ated-carb-head

It's probably a jazzed up (ceramiced/painted) Patriot header with a nasty looking 4:1 collector.

$90 cheaper in black paint: https://www.ipdusa.com/products/7013...eader-fi-weber
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Old 03-27-2017, 03:55 PM   #67
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And watch the flange to head point on those ipd/patriot units. They run the pipes through the flange, then weld on the side to be mated to the head, and mill the welds.
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Old 03-27-2017, 04:00 PM   #68
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Yeah, I had one for a few years. Not bought from IPD, but I saw one for $75 on Amazon once and got it (my original header was falling apart).

It was a cheap nasty little thing. Those milled welds that needed to seal were problematic for me (R-Sport head with larger ports). There was a bit of restriction at the flange as well, given the way they attached the pipes, they just sort of bulged inward a little.

I messed with the flange a bit too much trying to get it to work with my head, eventually a couple of the pipes cracked loose and I pitched it and got the KGTrimning header. Which is very nice, very stout, no issues with a flaky flange area construction. Worth the money, IMO.
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Old 03-27-2017, 04:53 PM   #69
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Quote:
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I have a KGTrimning 4:2:1 header on my PV, I'll try to get you a measurement on that tonight.

IPD has a header that has the shorter curves on the center cylinders: https://www.ipdusa.com/products/7014...ated-carb-head

It's probably a jazzed up (ceramiced/painted) Patriot header with a nasty looking 4:1 collector.

$90 cheaper in black paint: https://www.ipdusa.com/products/7013...eader-fi-weber
Thanks John, I'd really appreciate that - the problem area is 2" down from any of the lower manifold studs or 4" down from any of the upper manifold studs.

Yes, Most of the four-into-one headers will fit in behind the Judson intake and the IPD units look better than the crappy Patriot units.

Rather have the KGTrimming unit as I expect they provide more low-end torque which is what is needed for this car. I hope to use it for towing a lightweight vintage racing car to tracks in the northeast.

Are there any dealers in the US that stock them?

Last edited by vintagewrench; 03-28-2017 at 06:21 AM..
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Old 07-03-2017, 07:54 AM   #70
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The engine rebuild on the "Georgia Peach" 1968 122s B18 w/a Judson supercharger is starting to come together. Specially designed and machined CP-Carrillo forged pistons arrived last week that have: a zero deck height, an offset pin, and machined sides and interior for lightness. With a Cometic gasket, the combustion chamber will have a .032-inch squish band which should be optimal.

After I ridgid hone the block to finish bore size, clean it, and install new cam bearings, core plugs, and wrist pin bushings in the rods, the bottom end can go back together.

Also been busy working on the head, valves, and machining new conversion guides for B20 valves which have smaller stems. Have lightened the valve heads and swirl polished them and stems, and cut the B20 intake valve heads down to 41MM with is larger than the 40MM B18 intake valve heads. Still need to relieve the head, machine and install valve seats and do some very minor porting. The head is actually taking more time to do than the complete bottom end.
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Old 07-08-2017, 02:53 PM   #71
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Have finished machining the B18 cast iron conversion guides (bronze is not needed in this application, and really is only necessary for racing applications) to be used with B20 valves which have .312-inch (5/16″) diameter stems that are hard chromed and smaller than the original .343-inch (11/32″) stems for improved air flow. The end of the intake guides have also been tapered for better airflow through the port. The top end of the guides were machined for modern valve seals. Valves with chrome-plate stems and finely machined guide id's with a honed finish will last a very long time in street and highway use.

The new B20 exhaust and intake valves are in the center of the photo above shown in comparison to the B18 guides and valves on the left and the right. The dark spots near the valve head will disappear after a second blending angle is cut on the back side of the head for improved flow, after the new valve seats have been established in the head.

Both sides of the valve heads and the end of the stem where it meets the head have been lightened somewhat (compare them to an untouched valve below) by machining the two sides in the lathe and then swirl polishing the backside of the head. The 42MM B20 intake valve heads have been turned down to 41MM which is larger than the original 40MM B18 intake valve heads. B18 and B20 exhaust valve heads are both the same size.

Next up, install the guides in the head and machine for and press in exhaust valve seats, and cut larger intake valve seats. And finally, relieve the combustion chambers, and do some very minor porting behind the valve seats.

Delete the DOT in the following link and replace it with a period to learn more about what was involved and view pictures of how the guides were machined @ http://theoldmotorDOTcom/?p=165294

Last edited by vintagewrench; 07-08-2017 at 04:23 PM..
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