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Old 01-22-2014, 09:58 PM   #51
AllisonCustoms
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remote start is so nice on cold mornings. sooooooo nice. people give me funny looks when they find out i have remote start on a 240. people will give you funny looks when they find out you have remote start... and a t6
I am looking forward to a few luxuries. I got most of the interior out today, so hopefully I can get the wiring harness out on Thursday and then start rebuilding/building a new harness.
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Old 01-24-2014, 10:39 PM   #52
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Transmission crossmember. I had to make the trans mount with a 5 deg. slope, to match the transmission. When I built the Engine to trans adapter, I needed the 5 deg., so that two bolts WOULDN'T line up with each other. If I had mounted the engine at an angle like it was stock, this would not have been a problem.






I think when I pull everything back apart to paint and powder coat, I will fill in the sides of the opening that provides access to the mounting bolt. For now though, everything mounts up nicely.

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Old 01-24-2014, 10:40 PM   #53
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Mock-up bracket for my rear calipers. Took about 45 minutes to make the first one, then I decided to make it in the digital world so I can cut them out on a CNC Plasma. That took me over two hours - guess I should stick to a grinder and welder. I plan to cut out a few of these from 1/4" plate and use 1", 1/4" wall DOM tubing for the spacers. If anyone is interested in a pair of brackets, let me know.


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Old 01-25-2014, 08:16 AM   #54
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Nice
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Old 01-29-2014, 09:36 PM   #55
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Short struts without cutting, welding and HOPING the tube is still straight.

I'd planned on shortening my own struts, so I recently picked up a pair of strut tubes at the Pick-n-Pull. Also, in preparation for this, I ordered a 48mm x 1.0 pitch tap and it arrived today. After power washing (they still aren't real clean) I took one of the strut tubes and after about two hours I had it disassembled, retreaded and the threads chased clean.
I think the second tube will take about 30 minutes total, now that I know what tools are needed and have already made the chase.



Shot of my new investment, ready to go to work.


I marked the tap at about 3.25" so that I would know when I was deep enough to allow me to cut off at least 2 inches of the tube. It takes about 5/8" to screw the cab in place so anything over 2 5/8" would work. I am just not sure how much I want to cut off yet, and this gives me an extra 5/8" or so to play with.





After all the threads were cut, I had some clean up to do.


I then made this handy little chase out of an extra strut cap and a nut and bolt. Yes I know the weld looks like crap. I didn't spend much time (read none) cleaning the cap or the nut and bolt. I just dug up the nut and bolt from my spare bolts bin and turned the heat up on the welder.



I can use the chase to clean up the threads and then screw it in upside down (so the bolt is not in the way) and use it to clean the threads again after I cut the tube off. Just run it all the way down and cut above it. The bolt head is accessible from the bottom of the strut and the nut can be reached from the top.

When I am all done, I am planning on offering up the tap and chase to anyone who wants to do the same trick. I have seen some other loaner/rental tools going around and I think I would have to get about $15 dollars per user, so that I could eventually offset the cost of the tap. Anyone interested?

Last edited by AllisonCustoms; 02-05-2014 at 10:49 AM.. Reason: Photo Edit
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Old 01-31-2014, 03:37 AM   #56
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isnt it easier to cut the the threaded part off, then cut to desired length and weld the threaded part back on?
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Old 01-31-2014, 04:44 AM   #57
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isnt it easier to cut the the threaded part off, then cut to desired length and weld the threaded part back on?
Probably cheaper, but I can't imagine it is any easier. You have to build some kind of jig (even if it is only a couple of pieces of angle iron) to insure you get everything lined up straight. Then you need a welder and at least a basic amount of skill.

My way required a tap, a ratchet and a socket, thread the tap into the existing threads, ensuring you are straight in the tube, spray some cutting lube in the hole and start cutting threads. When you have the depth you want use a cutoff wheel or a hack saw and cut the tube to the desired length. No warpage from heat, no need for a welder and takes less than an hour.

In my opinion, the only down side is the high cost of the tap. Hence the reason I plan to offer it up for rent. Maybe I recoupe some of the cost, maybe not. Either way I have found yet another solution to the problem and I get to own another tool. (The reason I tend to do most jobs that could have been done differently.)
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Old 01-31-2014, 06:02 AM   #58
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You should start posting bigger photos. I can't see ****.
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Old 01-31-2014, 08:02 AM   #59
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Originally Posted by AllisonCustoms View Post
Probably cheaper, but I can't imagine it is any easier. You have to build some kind of jig (even if it is only a couple of pieces of angle iron) to insure you get everything lined up straight. Then you need a welder and at least a basic amount of skill.

My way required a tap, a ratchet and a socket, thread the tap into the existing threads, ensuring you are straight in the tube, spray some cutting lube in the hole and start cutting threads. When you have the depth you want use a cutoff wheel or a hack saw and cut the tube to the desired length. No warpage from heat, no need for a welder and takes less than an hour.

In my opinion, the only down side is the high cost of the tap. Hence the reason I plan to offer it up for rent. Maybe I recoupe some of the cost, maybe not. Either way I have found yet another solution to the problem and I get to own another tool. (The reason I tend to do most jobs that could have been done differently.)
yeah.. ok.. you won ;)
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Old 02-01-2014, 02:56 PM   #60
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Neat 242 build...that Chevy is pretty cool as well.

As for the strut... a "normal" person would go out and buy a lathe just so they could single point cut the threads...more tools man!
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Old 02-02-2014, 01:07 AM   #61
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Neat 242 build...that Chevy is pretty cool as well.

As for the strut... a "normal" person would go out and buy a lathe just so they could single point cut the threads...more tools man!
Your probably right about the lathe - should of thought more long term. No honey, we really NEED this very heavy and not at all complicated tool so that I can ____________(fill in the blank)
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Old 02-02-2014, 01:10 AM   #62
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[QUOTE=Mueller;4816839]Neat 242 build...that Chevy is pretty cool as well.

Thanks on both. The Volvo is for me, so it always goes to the end of the list when something else comes in. But the Chevy is in the March 2014 issue of Popular Hot Rodding as one of the 17 best builds of SEMA. I have to brag a little about that.
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Old 02-02-2014, 11:55 AM   #63
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I second the request for larger photographs.
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Old 02-05-2014, 10:50 AM   #64
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Added Larger Photos for last few posts
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Old 02-07-2014, 06:12 AM   #65
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Default Fascinated by those struts

So many good ideas on this thread. But the struts got me thinking. Could you figure out a way to refurb the no-longer-available Nivomats?
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Old 02-08-2014, 03:35 PM   #66
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So many good ideas on this thread. But the struts got me thinking. Could you figure out a way to refurb the no-longer-available Nivomats?
I have never even seen a set of the Nivomats. I couldn't say if they could be rebuilt.
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Old 03-02-2014, 11:22 PM   #67
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I had to get back to work, so I didn't make a ton of progress on the car the last couple of weeks. I did get my front and rear caliper brackets designed and cut out on the Plasma table.

I have also added the spacers (small sections of some 1" x 1/4" wall tubing) to both the front and rear plates so that they are a complete bracket now. I still need to finish cleaning up the rear end and paint it.

I also shortened the tubing on and added a threaded adapter to the panard bar to make it adjustable. While I was ordering parts I got enough stuff to make the upper rear control arms adjustable and new bushings for everything.

I'll try to take some pics later this week.

** I cut out some extra caliper bracket plates if anyone wants to make their own adapters, pm me if interested.

Last edited by AllisonCustoms; 03-06-2014 at 01:27 AM..
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Old 03-07-2014, 12:25 AM   #68
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Default Panhard Bar





Here is a look at the Adjustable Panhard Bar. I used the factory bar and just added a threaded insert and threaded rod. Just need to install the new bushings.
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Old 03-08-2014, 08:31 PM   #69
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Default March 08 Update

Here is a picture of the original upper control arm after blasting and in the jig. The jig is really only to let me set both arms to the same length and to the factory length.

This one shows the first cut I made.


I cut off about 2.25" on the first try and then went back and took off another .75" to get a nice finish. This allowed the threaded stud to be in the middle of its length when installed to the factory total length.


These are the threaded adapters and studs I used to make my adjustable links. I used a Left and a Right Hand thread, but this is realy not necessary on a single adjustable link. I just have plenty of both so why not!?


Adapter installed, you can also see the hole (there is another on the other side) for my plug welds.


The upper link is all welded up just need to push out the bushings and cleanup the welds, then its ready for paint.


My Rear axle all cleaned up and with a coat of primer. I am going to install new seals and bearings and then paint it.

Last edited by AllisonCustoms; 03-08-2014 at 09:00 PM..
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Old 03-08-2014, 09:53 PM   #70
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If I were making them, I would have used jack-screws instead of the setup you have going....a bit easier to adjust. If I wanted a setup like yours, I would have just bought the ipd units as they are made with much thicker tube to hold the bushings (the stock ones like to egg out and/or break when a bit of power is being put through the drivetrain).
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Old 03-09-2014, 12:52 AM   #71
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I'd consider Asher's advice. I used to break the OEM ones all the time in my 242. It was the main reason I switched to heims.
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Old 03-09-2014, 09:35 AM   #72
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If I were making them, I would have used jack-screws instead of the setup you have going....a bit easier to adjust. If I wanted a setup like yours, I would have just bought the ipd units as they are made with much thicker tube to hold the bushings (the stock ones like to egg out and/or break when a bit of power is being put through the drivetrain).
no extra power neccessary, did this to my old 84 completely stock. teenager with too hard of starts and shifts....
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But if we based all of our decisions off of what's practical, quiet, the safest, etc, we wouldn't be car enthusiasts, and we certainly wouldn't be daily driving 20+ year old swedish grocery carts. with tractor engines.
Model:_______________ Port of Origin:____ Recent Status:
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Old 03-10-2014, 12:20 AM   #73
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Thanks for the input. I often wonder if I anyone ever looks at this thread. It's nice to get some constructive criticism - occasionally.

I went the way I did, because I had already purchased new poly bushings for the factory parts. Then I decided to try making my own adjustable links.

I thought about using jack screws, but I only had one in my parts bin, so I went this way instead.
You are right about being easier to adjust with a jack screw, but I figure I will only be messing with adjustments a few times then - tighten everything up. I thought about adding a larger tube around the oem bushing ends, but with the oem version having the squished area in the middle and I couldn't see any real value. If I end up tearing the bushings, I can always cut off the bushing ends and add a thicker wall tubing and some universal poly bushings. I really don't want to go with heims because I want to be able to drive with out all the harshness coming thru from the road. I live in NM - our roads are awesome. - NOT

Last edited by AllisonCustoms; 03-10-2014 at 12:33 AM..
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Old 03-10-2014, 12:31 AM   #74
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Default March 09 Update

I took things a little further today and made my own rear lower control arms too. My coil over tabs are only tacked on at this point and I still need to add another (front) mounting point for the sway bar, but I think they came out pretty good and everything seems to be in the correct location to mount up.


I reused the factory bushing ends from the original trailing arms so that I could use my already purchased poly bushings, I did however reinforce them with a piece of .120" wall tubing around the outside, making them over .200" thick now.


The first one took about 4 hours for me to work through all of the design elements and bolt locations. The second one only took about 1.5 hours to cut and weld up all of the pieces. The hardest part was getting the old bushings out.


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Old 03-10-2014, 12:46 AM   #75
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My truck has hydroboost. I think it sucks. Please tell me why it's good.
It sucks on your truck because your trucks brakes suck, all GM truck brakes suck, doesn't matter how they are powered. Hydroboost is a great setup. Compact and easy to fit. Just run P/S pump to it, done and done. No low or non existent vacuum to worry about.

Car is lookin good, and a plasma table? Thats a nice thing to have access too. Aldo I like the jumbo tap for your strut tubes. Im curious to see those all finished up. Will be bitchin when done!
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