home register FAQ memberlist calendar

Go Back   Turbobricks Forums > Mechanical > maintenance & nonperformance

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 12-15-2018, 02:57 PM   #26
Redwood Chair
K-jet For Life
 
Redwood Chair's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: - Stock PSI Or Bust -
Default

Restore it to stock.
__________________
Raise The Lowered


Image hosted by servimg.com

Quote:
Originally Posted by hiperfauto View Post
Folks on here don't know a good deal when they see it.
how psi stock cna support?

Redwood Chair is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2018, 03:33 PM   #27
white855T
Board Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Dallas,TX
Default

If going poly(which I wouldn't), is the general consensus to keep the original shell in place and just remove old rubber and press in the poly?
__________________
Buyer/Seller Feedback

http://turbobricks.com/forums/showthread.php?t=301654
white855T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2018, 01:27 AM   #28
59volvo
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Default

make yer own - fyi:
http://www-ese.fnal.gov/People/wilce...shing_tool.htm

You Need This:

Homebrew Volvo Trailing Arm Bushing Tool

Special thanks to Jim Holst for taking the time to do the measurements on the actual Volvo tool, Don Foster for the tip on using 2" NPT End Caps, and my buddy Psycho for helping me set this web page up. I've added some pictures from Art Benstein who is another one of the Brickboard guys. He did what I should have done - took pictures while building the tool and while it was on the car. All of the machining and "on car" pictures are courtesy of Art. Thanks a lot for the pictures, Art!



After finding out the cost of a genuine Volvo Trailing Arm Bushing Tool was about $190, I decided to try to build my own. With the help of the guys mentioned above and a little time spent in the workshop, I came up with this concoction for under $20. And you don't need any "special" tools to create it. I found it to be very sturdy, and after the bushing job was done, there were no real signs of wear on the parts. Without a doubt, the toughest item to manufacture was the part of the tool that pushes the bushing out, but even that wasn't really hard. Just took a little time and patience. By the way, I don't know if it was the camera, the lighting, or the background, but the parts used are silver or black colored, not gold colored. Also, Warren Kernaghan asked me to mention that this tool is used on the 240 series cars, and not the 700/900 series. I'm not sure if it fits all years, but you can take a look at your rear suspension and determine that.

Some of the people on the Brickboard asked me to post the techniques I used to build it, and I'm in their debt for years of help, so here it is. If you do decide to build the tool, I'd be interested to hear how it went. You can contact me at the bottom of the page.



NOTE: Some people have mentioned that they're having problems with the coupler. I don't know what they are buying, but when you're buying the coupler, take your new bushing with you and make sure that it fits into the coupler. It should slide in smoothly with a little wiggle room. The NPT caps should easily screw all the way into the coupler. If it doesn't, you don't have the right coupler. Yes, I know that a tapered plug would have a tendency to tighten as it's screwed in, but if you've got the right coupler, it won't.





Photo Courtesy of Art Benstein

More Pictures of the Tool on Art's car

ToolOnCar1.jpg (576009 bytes) ToolOnCar2.jpg (591884 bytes) ToolOnCar4.jpg (620358 bytes)

Parts Needed:

Qty.1 8-1/2"-20 Grade 8 Bolt (specifically chosen for it's strength and fine pitch thread)

Available from McMaster Carr

Part # 91257A493

$3.83 ea.

See Item D in picture below

Qty.1 1/2"-20 Grade 8 Nut (specifically chosen for it's strength and fine pitch thread)

Available from McMaster Carr

Part # 90499A825

$6.80/ 50 (Have to buy a box of 50)

See Item F in picture below

Qty.2 1/2" Washers

Available from any hardware store

See Item G in picture below

Qty.2 2" NPSC (National Pipe Straight Coupling) Fully Threaded Coupling, 2" length

Available from Home Depot Electrical Section

Part number unknown, just make sure it's the 2" coupling, and it 's 2" length (actual 2.125")

Steel City is the mfg and the name on the box is "Rigid Threaded Conduit Coupler" and it has a part number of TRC2-1

Cost is about $2.50

See Items B and E in picture below

Qty.2 2" NPT Steel End caps

Available from Home Depot Plumbing Section

Part number unknown, don't buy cast iron. Make sure it can screw into the 2" coupling listed above with no effort.

Cost is about $2.00

See Items A and C in picture below





Tools needed to fabricate bushing tool

Bench Grinder

3/8" drill (better if you've got a 1/2" drill)

3/8" and 1/2" w/3/8" shank drill bit

Hacksaw

Dial Caliper

Metal File

2" long 3/8" bolt and nut if you've got a 3/8" drill

2" long 1/2" bolt and nut if you've got a 1/2" drill

Fabrication instructions

Item A

Item A) This is the bushing pusher.

1. Use the hand file on the top of the end cap to file a flat surface.

Here's Art working on his. partatop1.jpg (52830 bytes)

After futzing with the file, Art opted for more power. partatop2.jpg (67483 bytes)

2. If you've got a 1/2" drill, drill a 1/2" inch hole in the center of the cap. If you've only got a 3/8" drill, drill a 3/8" hole in the center. Try to get the hole as close to the center as possible. There's some room for slop, but not much. Art had a couple of methods he used to find the center. And yet another simpler way to find the center... Dennis Burns noticed that the inside of the cap has a concave dimple on it. Dennis used that as the center mark for the cap and drilled it out from the bottom. He said that after drilling, the hole wasn't centered on the top surface of the cap, but it was centered to the circumference of the cap, which is the most important thing. Thanks for the tip, Dennis!

findingcenterparta1.jpg (58590 bytes) findingcenterparta2.jpg (52157 bytes) findingcenterparta4.jpg (58820 bytes)

3. Insert the 2" long 3/8" (or 1/2") bolt so the threads of the bolt are sticking out the top of the cap. Put the nut on the bolt and tighten it. Put the shaft of the bolt in the drill chuck and tighten it down.

4. Using your bench grinder, hold the drill with the end cap and bolt at a right angle to the stone face. The direction of rotation of the bench grinder is down, so the rotation of the drill with the end cap will be up. Move the cap back and forth across the face of the stone until you achieve an outside diameter of 2.184". It's better to make it a little bigger than smaller. Stop and measure often. This took me about a half hour to do this. Art came up with a quicker method using an electric motor and special arbor tool.

Here's part A mounted up. millingparta1.jpg (63882 bytes)

Here's the arbor tool he used. arbortool.jpg (43830 bytes)

And here's the machining in process. Man, do I love sparks! millingparta3.jpg (61913 bytes)

5. With the end cap still in the drill chuck, turn the bottom of the end cap towards the stone, and put a nice flat surface on the bottom of the cap. This is the surface that will contact the bushing. This is what it should look like when it's done.

parta1.jpg (43549 bytes) parta2.jpg (50166 bytes)

6. Remove the bolt from the end cap. If you used a 3/8" drill, use the 1/2" drill bit with the 3/8" shank to achieve a 1/2" diameter hole in the top of the end cap.



Item B and C

Item B) This is one part of the bushing receiver

No fabrication necessary. Works as is.

Item C) This is the other part of the bushing receiver. It screws into Item B.

Follow steps 1 and 2 from Item A.

Drill a 1/2" hole in the center of the cap.

Item D) This is the bolt that you'll turn to move the bushing pusher. Grease the threads when you use it.

No fabrication necessary. Works as is.

Item E) This is the piece that fits between the 2 brackets that hold the bushing to the axle. It keeps the brackets from bending as you press out the bushing.

Using your hacksaw, (or if you've got a sabre saw with a metal bit) cut the coupler in half length wise.

The dimension that Jim Holst gave me for the width (bracket to bracket) of this piece was 2.124". If you want to use that dimension, you don't have to do any machining to this part. Even though this is supposed to be a 2" width, it's actually 2.125". I thought it was a little to tight, so I ground down the edge to 2.100".

Art Benstein mentioned that sometimes this piece doesn't fit snugly enough to stay on the bracket. He came up with the idea of using a hose clamp to temporarily hold this piece to the bracket. Here's a picture Art sent me. Thanks again, Art!

DSCN2532.JPG (605517 bytes)

Note: If you check the inside diameter of this piece against the diameter of the brackets on the axle housing, you'll notice that the this piece is not wide enough. Not to worry. When you place it between the brackets, use a hammer to pound it in. It'll bend to the shape of the bracket.

Item F) The nut on the end of the 8" bolt.

No fabrication necessary. Works as is.

Item G) The washers used at the head end of the 8" bolt. Grease these well before cranking out the bushing.

No fabrication necessary. Works as is.



Here's the new bushing installed

Photos once again courtesy of Art Benstein



Tips and Hints

Number One Hint: Once you've built the tool, don't loan it to Johnny Chan of Seattle Washington. I loaned mine to him in the beginning of November '02 for the cost of shipping and he hasn't returned it. Doesn't even answer my email anymore. Apparently, since he couldn't get me to build one for him, he decided it's within his rights to keep mine. Hopefully, the little twerp will be on the receiving end of some cosmic retribution.
When you remove the trailing arm, remove the rear bolt first. If you remove the front first, the rear will tend to slide around when trying to unbolt it.
The Trailing Arm Bushing Removal tool must be lined up so the edge of the bushing pusher (Item A) is centered on the bushing. You may have to remove the steel tube from the old bushing to do this. You can use the Tool to do this. Remove Item A and use a half inch drive socket. As you torque down, the steel tube will push out.
Item C can be screwed in or out to adjust the depth of the bolt.
Don't worry that the bushing receiver is only 2" long. Once you get the old bushing out about an inch to an inch and a half, you can wiggle it out the rest of the way.
Be sure the amount of overhang for the new bushing on both sides of the bracket is the same as the old bushing you removed.
Use a little dish soap as a lubricant during installation of the new bushing
An impact gun and penetrating oil makes bushing removal easier, but it can be done with regular old 1/2" breaker bar
Some people have said that they have had to remove some of the threads on item B (bushing receiver) to allow the old bushing to fit into it during removal. I had no problem with mine. I suggest you take your new bushing with you when you buy the receiver (coupler) and make sure it fits.
When you install the new bushing, make sure that the head of the grade 8 bolt is towards the differential. If you put it in from the other (wheel) side, you'll never get the bolt out when you're done installing the bushing. This tip is from Dennis who didn't leave his last name.



My Disclaimer: Always use safety glasses, jack stands. I am not responsible for improper use of this tool. This is not an original Volvo Tool. I make no claim as to the quality of construction or it's sturdiness. I just know it worked for me.

Official Disclaimer
59volvo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2018, 08:51 PM   #29
carver
Redblock for life.
 
carver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Seattle
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by 59volvo View Post
make yer own - fyi:
http://www-ese.fnal.gov/People/wilce...shing_tool.htm
yadda yadda yadda...
Not the issue, he has a homebrew tool already. Think this thread is done by now. Install Lemforder and be done with it.
carver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2019, 08:08 PM   #30
golddayton101
Board Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: DFW
Default

Update! I bought a set of Lemforder bushings and fixed the issue! Thanks for the input.
golddayton101 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2019, 09:26 AM   #31
VB242
Happy Mew Year!!!
 
VB242's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Virginia Beach
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by white855T View Post
If going poly(which I wouldn't), is the general consensus to keep the original shell in place and just remove old rubber and press in the poly?
Sort of relevant- to install poly on the front position or the LCA you need to press out the complete bushing with shell before installing the poly.
__________________
1980 primer JDM flares franken-242DL now with 8.8, 1989 silver 780 sienna rear spring nivomat delete.

Last edited by VB242; 01-06-2019 at 02:46 PM..
VB242 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2019, 06:25 PM   #32
golddayton101
Board Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: DFW
Default

The issue with me pressing in the bare shell that came with the IPD kit was that my tool would press into the shell and bend the shape causing it to get stuck before pressing all the way through. In hindsight, I would recommend a large 1" washer to prevent this from happening.
golddayton101 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2019, 11:16 PM   #33
Redwood Chair
K-jet For Life
 
Redwood Chair's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: - Stock PSI Or Bust -
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by golddayton101 View Post
The issue with me pressing in the bare shell that came with the IPD kit was that my tool would press into the shell and bend the shape causing it to get stuck before pressing all the way through. In hindsight, I would recommend a large 1" washer to prevent this from happening.
Ya no that IPD crap isn't tapered and won't go all the way in anyway.
Redwood Chair is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2019, 11:21 PM   #34
gsellstr
Vintage anti-ricer
 
gsellstr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Somewhere in a northern California smog bank
Default

Makes me happy to see Superpro now has a set with new outer shells as well.
__________________
RIP
Doug Williams "Mr. Doug" 4/15/2009
Pete Fluitman "fivehundred" 7/14/2013
Mick Starkey "TrickMick" 1/10/14
Mark Baldwin "blue850t5" 7/19/18
Nick Fengler "fengler" 8/6/18
Thomas Fritz "stealthfti" 10/11/18


74 144 B20
http://forums.turbobricks.com/showthread.php?t=224983

90 745Ti
http://forums.turbobricks.com/showthread.php?t=334698

If you need Superpro bushings PM me for price and availability!
gsellstr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2019, 01:04 PM   #35
Redwood Chair
K-jet For Life
 
Redwood Chair's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: - Stock PSI Or Bust -
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by gsellstr View Post
Makes me happy to see Superpro now has a set with new outer shells as well.
Are they properly tapered?
Redwood Chair is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2019, 04:08 PM   #36
gsellstr
Vintage anti-ricer
 
gsellstr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Somewhere in a northern California smog bank
Default

I haven't had a set in my hands yet to measure, but I'm very curious as well. I may ping my insider contact, see what they have for dim's and pics.
gsellstr is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:10 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.