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Old 04-06-2015, 10:48 AM   #26
smokeyfan1000
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Originally Posted by 93Volvo240 View Post
Yeah I finally realized that after I found out what it was.. I will tighten it tomorrow if I get the chance. It needs to be tightened with the vehicles full weight on the ground, correct?
NO..needs to be raised off the ground.

Use the search function and search front wheel brg adjustment OR replacement This has been covered on TB a number of times.

If you do it incorrectly you can really screw things up.
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Old 04-06-2015, 11:45 AM   #27
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I had that clunk on one side after I replaced the struts. I had a gland nut that had about 2 more turns left before being fully tight but that caused the strut to be loose enough to clunk.
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Old 04-06-2015, 11:54 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by smokeyfan1000 View Post
NO..needs to be raised off the ground.

Use the search function and search front wheel brg adjustment OR replacement This has been covered on TB a number of times.

If you do it incorrectly you can really screw things up.
He's talking about the strut gland nut, based on what he quoted (me).

You can tighten the gland nut with the car on the ground, but how would you reach it? You need the wheel off so you can get to it, so support the car on a jackstand and use a pipe wrench. They work quite well (assuming you still have stock-type front springs that have enough space to get a pipe wrench in there.)

Front wheel bearings do fail. I've only lost one on our endurance race car, because our inner grease seal was missing I think. Otherwise, never had an issue with one because I monitor the condition of the front end and will adjust them and/or repack & adjust them as needed. They are serviceable. I've never had to replace a bad one on one of my cars because I've never let one get to that point. Even on my autocross car with big tires, no problems even after years of hard driving. I don't consider them a weak point, if maintained.

The symptom I noticed when the bearing was failing on our endurance race car was a long brake pedal, but it pumped up firm and felt fine until a few more corners. The wheel/hub/rotor was wobbling on the spindle so it pushed the brake pads back. Pedal sank almost to the floor to get the pads back up to the rotor, but then it was firm because the brake system was fine. Barely made it around to the pits on that lap, by the time I was on the hot pit there was smoke from the front wheel and the rotor was digging into the aluminum caliper. Still can't believe the caliper didn't break. It sounded bad and looked worse. Ended up having to cut the inner race off the spindle, but then was able to install a new bearing and continue racing.
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Old 04-06-2015, 11:55 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smokeyfan1000 View Post
NO..needs to be raised off the ground.

Use the search function and search front wheel brg adjustment OR replacement This has been covered on TB a number of times.

If you do it incorrectly you can really screw things up.
Alright ill jack it up and tighten it down. Thank you guys.
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Old 04-06-2015, 12:01 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by 93Volvo240 View Post
Alright ill jack it up and tighten it down. Thank you guys.
Don't just reef down on that castle nut.

Read the instructions, too much preload and it will fail quickly.

Do reef down on the gland nut, but don't scratch the chrome.
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Old 04-06-2015, 12:04 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by towerymt View Post
He's talking about the strut gland nut, based on what he quoted (me).

You can tighten the gland nut with the car on the ground, but how would you reach it? You need the wheel off so you can get to it, so support the car on a jackstand and use a pipe wrench. They work quite well (assuming you still have stock-type front springs that have enough space to get a pipe wrench in there.)

Front wheel bearings do fail. I've only lost one on our endurance race car, because our inner grease seal was missing I think. Otherwise, never had an issue with one because I monitor the condition of the front end and will adjust them and/or repack & adjust them as needed. They are serviceable. I've never had to replace a bad one on one of my cars because I've never let one get to that point. Even on my autocross car with big tires, no problems even after years of hard driving. I don't consider them a weak point, if maintained.

The symptom I noticed when the bearing was failing on our endurance race car was a long brake pedal, but it pumped up firm and felt fine until a few more corners. The wheel/hub/rotor was wobbling on the spindle so it pushed the brake pads back. Pedal sank almost to the floor to get the pads back up to the rotor, but then it was firm because the brake system was fine. Barely made it around to the pits on that lap, by the time I was on the hot pit there was smoke from the front wheel and the rotor was digging into the aluminum caliper. Still can't believe the caliper didn't break. It sounded bad and looked worse. Ended up having to cut the inner race off the spindle, but then was able to install a new bearing and continue racing.
Wow, my problem seems a bit less severe. Just a but of a wobble/vibration noise over bumps. I might as well repack wheel bearings if they're not too hard to get to.
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Old 04-06-2015, 12:25 PM   #32
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All this overthinking is a pleasant diversion from work, but I'd hate to see you wind up tearing the whole thing apart. Re-packing is a nice sunny Saturday morning plan, but you just want the wheel to be tight for now.

A front wheel bearing can withstand an adjustment or two over its multi-hundred-thousand mile existence without needing overhaul. Really. Just pull out the cotter pin and see how far you can turn the nut tighter to gauge whether it needs adjustment.

Edit: You don't need to remove the wheel. Just get it a bit off of the ground.

Do this by hand, not with a breaker bar. Just fingers to start with, or go easy with an adjustable wrench or channel lock pliers. I use the same ones I used to grab the dust cap and straighten and pull the cotter pin.

Just don't leave it that tight after finding whether it cures that noise you generated by pounding the tire at 12 o'clock. And if you ever hear these singing to you as you go around the cloverleaves, then get them changed.
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Last edited by cleanflametrap; 04-06-2015 at 12:39 PM.. Reason: Make it clear about not needing to remove the wheel.
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Old 04-06-2015, 12:28 PM   #33
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^

Finger tight only, then put the pin back in, put the wheel back on and wrangle it around to check for play, then bend the pin, and reassemble.
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Old 04-06-2015, 12:32 PM   #34
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I usually pre-load the bearing until I start to feel some drag while spinning the wheel then back the nut off til it spins freely.
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Old 04-06-2015, 12:33 PM   #35
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This indeed!
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Old 04-06-2015, 12:40 PM   #36
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I usually pre-load the bearing until I start to feel some drag while spinning the wheel then back the nut off til it spins freely.
Exactly.
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Old 04-06-2015, 12:49 PM   #37
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I definitely like to have the wheel on the hub to gauge how free the hub turns. I can't tell when just spinning the hub, always feels too tight.

I'll use a socket on a ratchet, but hold the ratchet near the socket end and snug the castle nut down, then back it off a little bit. You don't want play, but you don't want preload either. It takes touch. With the wheel on, you can feel if it spins freely or if it drags a bit. You can also feel for play more easily with the wheel on the hub (snug down a couple of lugnuts).

I'd still suggest verifying the strut gland nut in the top of the strut tube is tight before popping the grease cap off the spindle to mess with the wheel bearing. If you can feel play on the wheel at all points, then yes, likely the wheel bearing is at fault if everything else checks out.
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Old 04-06-2015, 12:57 PM   #38
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tight crown nuts lead to crazy ladies in minivans flipping you off as you violently jerk into their lane at 80 mph.....
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Old 04-06-2015, 01:10 PM   #39
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Well apparently there's more to it than I thought. I'll Jack it up, tighten the gland nut and see if that fixes my problem. Next I'll check the wheel bearing.
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Old 04-06-2015, 08:45 PM   #40
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-I removed the dust cap and verified that the wheel bearing nut was as finger tight as it should go, then I put it all back together.
-I attempted to tighten the gland nut with some channel locks but it didn't budge. I'll assume this means it's tight enough.
-I removed the nut on top of the strut (car on the ground) and shimmed it with some washers, but the noise remained, so I removed the washers and put everything back together.

I think I'm overthinking this, so I took a video of the tie rod end while my father turned the steering wheel back and forth. I know a worn outer tie rod can cause steering wheel noise and play, but will it cause a 'pop' noise over bumps as well? I always thought ball joints made the pop over bumps.
Warning, video is kinda loud.
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Old 04-06-2015, 10:06 PM   #41
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Bump.

While in the air it was hard to get any play out of that tie rod end but on the ground it was very noticeable.
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Old 04-06-2015, 10:44 PM   #42
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Tie rod looks trashed.
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Old 04-06-2015, 10:52 PM   #43
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Tie rod looks trashed.
I did a steering rack a while back that came with INNER tie rods but for some reason I didn't do outers. The one that's making noise has mainly up and down play instead of the normal side to side play.

Anyway, is meyle still an a-okay replacement? Anything but scan tech?
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Old 04-07-2015, 01:22 AM   #44
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I did a steering rack a while back that came with INNER tie rods but for some reason I didn't do outers. The one that's making noise has mainly up and down play instead of the normal side to side play.

Anyway, is meyle still an a-okay replacement? Anything but scan tech?
OE VOLVO , TRW or MOOG usually the best bets for outer tie rods
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Old 04-07-2015, 01:37 AM   #45
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OE VOLVO , TRW or MOOG usually the best bets for outer tie rods
I don't know why I said Meyle
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Old 04-07-2015, 01:47 AM   #46
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That's it for sure! good work.
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Old 04-07-2015, 01:52 AM   #47
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https://www.fcpeuro.com/products/vol...-end-3516944oe
This says genuine Volvo, but the part reads TRW. Either way should be good? Is $35 a piece reasonable for a TRW unit? Thank you all for your help.
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Old 04-07-2015, 06:57 AM   #48
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I only like to use OEM or MOOG.
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Old 04-07-2015, 11:36 PM   #49
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I only like to use OEM or MOOG.
Just ordered 2 MOOG tie rod ends for $58 shipped. 2 day shipping as well. I'm really hoping that since they're greasable they'll last much longer.
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Old 04-24-2015, 01:04 AM   #50
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Installed the moog brand tie rod ends and WOW. Much better. No pop while turning the steering wheel and the noise over bumps is much quieter. There's still a small bump but it's probably a strut or ball joint.
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