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Old 11-14-2020, 07:39 AM   #1
FyoDisco
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Default Move AC from a '93 to a '90 - Volvo 240

Hey guys! I'm new to this forum. I'm about to move a complete AC-system from my 1993 car to my 1990 car without AC. I've never done this before and since 240's with AC is much more common in the US than in Sweden I thought I might ask for your help. I've read a few threads on the subject but I still have some questions.

The car I'm taking the AC-system from is a '93 as I've mentioned. Therefore it's already made for R134 , which is good I believe. Or do you recommend another cooling gas?

I am going to reuse everything except for the accumulator and the condenser. Is there something else aswell I should buy brand new? All the o-rings will be replaced of course.

Will there be any problems when installing the AC-system to my '90? I've looked a little bit under the hood and as far as I've noticed I need to drill a few holes for the condenser, the hoses/lines and for the attachment of the accumulator. Is there something else that can cause me troubles?

I've understood that the 93 system is different from the 91-92 system, and that the big difference is the threads on the couplings. During my search for parts it seems more difficult to find parts for the 93-system. According to the GCP catalogue I'm supposed to have the accumulator with part number 3537542, but it's not in stock at Volvo/GCP. On the other hand, there is a accumulator with part number 9131972 in stock and it's supposed to be for a '93 system. Do you know if there is a difference between these two?

The white wagon is the 1993 and the red wagon is the 1990, the one who is getting the AC.



This is what it looks like under the hood on the 1993.


Last edited by FyoDisco; 11-29-2020 at 08:59 AM..
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Old 11-14-2020, 07:40 AM   #2
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Nvm, solved it! Just a problem with the pictures.

Last edited by FyoDisco; 11-14-2020 at 07:48 AM..
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Old 11-14-2020, 11:46 AM   #3
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Try these threads (there's another one somewhere about the 93 vs earlier accessory bracket and V versus Straight compressor connections).
http://forums.turbobricks.com/showthread.php?t=330298
http://forums.turbobricks.com/showthread.php?t=343672
http://forums.turbobricks.com/showthread.php?t=356477

Does your 90 have the full heater box and evaporator, or are you planning on swapping heater boxes? You'll want a new orifice tube - they're cheap.

If your 93 hoses aren't in good shape, you may be better off having new hoses built. If you need to have hoses built, there are more choices for parts and replacement compressors (not limited to the 93-only)
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Old 11-14-2020, 01:33 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FyoDisco View Post
Hey guys! I'm new to this forum. I'm about to move a complete AC-system from my 1993 car to my 1990 car without AC. I've never done this before and since 240's with AC is much more common in the US than in Sweden I thought I might ask for your help. I've read a few threads on the subject but I still have some questions.
Over the summer I finished doing the same retrofit of a 1993 AC system into my 1975 242. This started in 2019 with interior parts I harvested from a rusted & worn out 1993 wagon I picked up for cheap. The vent/heater core/evaporator/blower motor/etc. unit from the dash as well as the passenger side firewall panel which is needed for the AC pipes. Another aspect of the 1993 panel design is there is also an additional hole for the ABS wiring pass-through. Its hard to tell from your picture if you have that on your 1993. The intent was to also pull the everything from the engine compartment of the donor, but I was unable to loosen any of the AC lines due to corrosion and didn't want to break any of them so waited for another donor to show up.

Pictures of the interior work: https://www.flickr.com/photos/681445...57711094280958










In May 2020 a 1993 Classic appeared at a San Jose junkyard and from carcass I was able to pull all of the pieces needed for the engine bay. A couple weeks later everything had been installed, vacuumed out the system and then refilled it with R134a. It worked out quite well. What also helped is I also have have a 1993 245 which was useful as a reference point.

Some main things to consider:

1) Wiring differences: While I have a 1975 242, It has a 1990 B230 and Lh2.4 FI system. For example I did have to splice some of the wires together as the 1990 system has three wires going to the switch on the dryer and the 1993 only has two. This also includes the wiring for the dash switch as well.

Some 1993 battery connectors have separate fuses for the AC and other systems. This is mainly for the electric fan circuit which I have not hooked up in my 1975 yet. The Classic in the junkyard came with the electric fan set up while my 1993 245 does not have one, so not sure what cars those came on.

2) Any AC connection taken apart the O-rings were replaced. There are O-ring kits available.

3) I installed up a new dryer. You may be able to reuse the old one if its a quick transfer between the car. I had to drill out mounting holes in the inner fender wall to mount the 1993 dryer bracket.

4) Replaced the expansion valve, it is cheap and easy to do.

5) Replaced the blower motor from the 1993 donor (it was known to be on its last legs.) Installed a new VDO unit and it turned out to be wired backwards.
See this thread: http://forums.turbobricks.com/showthread.php?t=354676
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Old 11-16-2020, 01:39 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobxyz View Post
Try these threads (there's another one somewhere about the 93 vs earlier accessory bracket and V versus Straight compressor connections).
http://forums.turbobricks.com/showthread.php?t=330298
http://forums.turbobricks.com/showthread.php?t=343672
http://forums.turbobricks.com/showthread.php?t=356477

Does your 90 have the full heater box and evaporator, or are you planning on swapping heater boxes? You'll want a new orifice tube - they're cheap.

If your 93 hoses aren't in good shape, you may be better off having new hoses built. If you need to have hoses built, there are more choices for parts and replacement compressors (not limited to the 93-only)
I'll take a look at those threads. Thank you!

Yes, I'm planning to swap the heater boxes as well. Do you have the part number for the orifice tube?

Okay, I hope all the hoses are in good condition, but I haven't checked yet. Is it better to have new hoses built or to buy original Volvo hoses?
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Old 11-16-2020, 01:53 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by polaris View Post
Over the summer I finished doing the same retrofit of a 1993 AC system into my 1975 242. This started in 2019 with interior parts I harvested from a rusted & worn out 1993 wagon I picked up for cheap. The vent/heater core/evaporator/blower motor/etc. unit from the dash as well as the passenger side firewall panel which is needed for the AC pipes. Another aspect of the 1993 panel design is there is also an additional hole for the ABS wiring pass-through. Its hard to tell from your picture if you have that on your 1993. The intent was to also pull the everything from the engine compartment of the donor, but I was unable to loosen any of the AC lines due to corrosion and didn't want to break any of them so waited for another donor to show up.
Thank you for your reply! Great help!

My donor car doesn't have an electric fan so I guess that won't be a problem. Did wiring for the heater box/fan/control panel match or did you have to splice or joint the cables?

Did you buy an o-ring kit from Volvo or was it aftermarket?

I'll replace the dryer/accumulator. This won't be a quick swap and I don't know the condition of the old accumulator. I don't know if the compressor works either. I'll have to check that.

Where is the placement of the expansion valve? Is it on the compressor?
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Old 11-20-2020, 12:21 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FyoDisco View Post
Thank you for your reply! Great help!

My donor car doesn't have an electric fan so I guess that won't be a problem. Did wiring for the heater box/fan/control panel match or did you have to splice or joint the cables?

Did you buy an o-ring kit from Volvo or was it aftermarket?

I'll replace the dryer/accumulator. This won't be a quick swap and I don't know the condition of the old accumulator. I don't know if the compressor works either. I'll have to check that.

Where is the placement of the expansion valve? Is it on the compressor?

I picked up an aftermarket o-ring kit, believe it was $10 and I picked it up from Rockauto.com

Made a mistake in my post, I typed expansion valve but meant orifice tube. The OT sits inside one of the metal lines along the front of the frame rail. When I scavenged the parts our of the junkyard this is one of the connectors I opened up. When installing into my car put in a new OT and O-ring and tightened it up. (see attached picture)

As for wiring from from the heater box etc. is the same in the 1990 & 1993. The one thing you need to look at are the green wires going the AC dash switch as in 1990 that was a rheostat set up and the 1993 has a binary on/off switch. I ended up marking the various green wires as I, II, and III to differentiate where they were headed to (compressor, pressure sender, ECU)

In both the dash and in the engine compartment needed to splice some of the green wires to together to use the stock 1990 wiring with the 1993 AC pieces. I had 1990 & 1993 AC wiring diagrams and what took a while for me to figure out the 1993 system did not have a solenoid as depicted in the diagram. Ended up making a color-coded version to help with the wires under the hood and behind the dash. Also, it is not depicted on the wiring diagrams, the two leads on the 1990 dash rheostat switch (blue/yellow & red/gray) are connected to the 1993 snowflake switch.
Attached Images
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File Type: jpg IMG_0792 sm.jpg (77.5 KB, 58 views)
File Type: png 1990 AC wiring.png (140.3 KB, 58 views)
File Type: png 1990 240 AC wiring color sm.png (146.1 KB, 59 views)
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Old 11-21-2020, 05:06 PM   #8
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In the GCP catalogue it says expansion valve, so it's the same as orifice tube. But I think it is more common for it to be refered as orifice tube. Or maybe that's only in the US? I found that the part number is 3545086, but it's not in stock at GCP/Volvo. However there are aftermarket parts available.

Thank you for the wiring diagram and you explanations. It's difficult to visiualize everything now, but I'm certain it will become clear when I start working with the AC system. Just to make it clear, the coloured wiring diagram you posted is for a 1990 AC system?

Another question: do you guys recommend replacing the old condensor even if it looks good? A new one cost about $330 and I'm thinking if I can save some money there. If it breaks down in the future then isn't it just install a new one and fill up the system again with a coolant gas?
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Old 11-21-2020, 05:39 PM   #9
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I think the orifice tubes are a standardized A/C part used by lots of different cars. It's a ~$3 plastic part. There is also a "automatic adjusting" version for more $$$. The orifice tube is used in A/C systems that cycle the compressor on-and-off to regulate the A/C - CCOT for clutch cycling orifice tube. Expansion valves are much more $$$ and regulate the flow in the system differently.
https://www.fcpeuro.com/Volvo-parts/...orifice%20tube

I don't know about Sweden, but in the US you can borrow a "A/C Flush Gun" from some of the auto parts stores. This, plus an air compressor and a can of A/C Flush solution, allows you to blow solvent through the condenser and evaporator to clean the gunk out. If the A/C compressor has died, it may have sent metal bits into the system, which are hard or impossible to get out.
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Old 11-22-2020, 11:48 AM   #10
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Okay, now I understand! Thanks! Is it preferred to have an expansion valve or does it make no difference on a Volvo 240? $18 isn't much, even if it's just a small plastic part.

There probably should be anything like that available here in Sweden. I've never worked with an AC system before so everything is new to me. Are you supposed to flush the system when it's still in the old car, before I pick everything apart and move it the the "new" car? Is it needed for the compressor to work for it to be possible to flush the system? I have no idea if the compressor works.
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Old 11-22-2020, 11:49 AM   #11
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Double post
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Old 11-24-2020, 12:56 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FyoDisco View Post
In the GCP catalogue it says expansion valve, so it's the same as orifice tube. But I think it is more common for it to be refered as orifice tube. Or maybe that's only in the US? I found that the part number is 3545086, but it's not in stock at GCP/Volvo. However there are aftermarket parts available.

Thank you for the wiring diagram and you explanations. It's difficult to visiualize everything now, but I'm certain it will become clear when I start working with the AC system. Just to make it clear, the coloured wiring diagram you posted is for a 1990 AC system?

Another question: do you guys recommend replacing the old condensor even if it looks good? A new one cost about $330 and I'm thinking if I can save some money there. If it breaks down in the future then isn't it just install a new one and fill up the system again with a coolant gas?
In regards to the orifice tube, this is where I picked mine up at as part of a kit:
https://www.rockauto.com/en/catalog/...be+kit,1001977

Yes, the color wiring diagram is for the 1990 240s. The only real difference between the two diagrams is I removed the solenoid from the color diagram as my 1993 system did not have it. One of the things I did was to use a multimeter/continuity tester to trace the wires through the system. The 1993 diagram included the electric fan and relay.

For the condenser I would use what you have. Once you get the system closed up, the next step is to draw a vacuum for a while then let it sit for 15 minutes to see if anything is leaking. If your condenser is shot then I would say replace it out at that point. Pulling the vacuum is before you have put in any refrigerant so if you do need to replace the condenser it still a fairly straight-forward procedure.

With my 242 I had to drill holes to mount the condenser with the rubber mounts. Not sure if you will need to do that as well. The other item you will need to drill holes to mount is for the dryer as that sits behind the right headlight on the 1990 cars and next to the firewall on the later cars. There are two studs integrated into the inner fender metal on the 1993 240s, I drilled out two holes and used bolts to secure the dryer bracket.

Images:
1) 1993 Wiring Diagram
2) Continuity test for the red/gray wiring going to the ECU
3) Left: 1993 wiring connector, Right: 1990 wiring going to dryer (cut by previous owner) These is the wiring which needed to be spliced/connected together in the engine compartment
4) Holes drilled for the dryer bracket on the inner fender
5) The AC parts picked up off the 1993 Classic in the junkyard.
Attached Images
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Old 11-28-2020, 05:08 PM   #13
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Thank you for you help, polaris! I've decided to not buy a new condensor. I've ordered a new accumulator and a new orifice tube. Just going to find a o-ring kit here in Sweden.

Yeah I'll have to drill new holes in my car as well. Both for the condensor and the accumulator. Also for the brackets which holds the hoses. I'm not so fond of drilling holes in my car, but you have to do what you have to do.

How can I test if the compressor works? I think the system is empty. Do I have to refill the compressor with new oil when I move it over to my other car?
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