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Old 05-31-2020, 11:15 PM   #151
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Installed my repainted and rust-free coolant overflow tray.






I touched up the spots where the tray touches the body. Practiced using my cup brush while the paint dried.



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Old 06-04-2020, 11:19 PM   #152
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Well, this has been a difficult day. Found out I bought the wrong reservoir hose and not enough overflow tubing. Correct orders have been placed, but that was ten bucks wasted. Might be putting some stuff up on the classified ads. Smoke-free home, kept in dry storage, etc etc.

In happier news I broke the fuel filter loose. I underestimated how much gas one of those bad boys holds and now my whole garage smells like gasoline. Oh well, a win's a win.
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Old 06-04-2020, 11:34 PM   #153
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I swear you spend more time on cleaning then actually fixing/replacing parts. That has always been my experience. Slow and steady wins the race.
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Old 06-10-2020, 08:43 PM   #154
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Progress is looking good! Cleaning is part of the process, It's much nicer to work with clean parts than parts coated in oil and dirt. Less crap to fall in your eyes when you are under it too.
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Old 06-24-2020, 04:43 AM   #155
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Thanks for the encouragement! Bet you'll never guess what happens in this update... :D

New overflow hose has been cut and now I just need the new radiator hose to arrive from Sweden at some point. Harness is coming out without a fight, which is a nice surprise. The oil pressure sending unit's wires pretty much disintegrated without much force.

Busied myself refinishing the oil cooler bracket. I took off 99% of the rust but there's still a small amount of pitting remaining. Hopefully I've slopped on enough coats of Rustoleum semi-gloss high-heat to keep it from rusting for a little longer. Not my favorite paint with how it chips, but it looks the part.











Cleaned up the fuel filter bracket as well. I think I might know a McMaster-Carr P/N that replaces one of the gaskets.



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Old 07-13-2020, 04:14 AM   #156
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New grommet installed! As I said in the thread I have going in the Maintenance section, the gasket is a little smaller, but it's nothing a thin bead of gorilla glue won't fix. That should get it to hold.

Currently doing my homework for the harness install. Dave Barton included a lot more information than I was expecting, but I dug up an old post from hiperfauto who had the page showing where the different connectors/plugs are located. That was the final piece I needed. I will also need to order a new female connector since the RH. one disintegrated as I took it off.

I also took the roof rack off to get it all cleaned up but I sheared one of the carriage bolts off. It would probably make more sense to just buy a new one, but $8 for some new bolts and some grinding & paint sounds more fun.
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Old 07-21-2020, 09:38 PM   #157
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New fuel filter in along with the new grommet installed.



Took the roof rack off to do some light clean up. The outer side fared a lot better than the inner side, though the surprising thing is that it didn't trap any of the salt surf. Some light discoloration on the roof, but nothing too bad. Pictures taken after light clean-up. Time to lay down some rust-stabilizing spray on.







Time to tackle this beast next! (Also the battery tray)




Is the trick to drop the glove box, disconnect whatever's in the dash, and push the grommet out OR is there a better way?
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Old 07-22-2020, 01:04 AM   #158
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You shouldn’t have to disconnect anything inside the car, just remove the glovebox and the insulation pad under the dash and push the grommet through.
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Old 07-24-2020, 04:04 PM   #159
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kampman View Post
You shouldn’t have to disconnect anything inside the car, just remove the glovebox and the insulation pad under the dash and push the grommet through.
Thanks for the tip. It worked like a charm. Now I have to save up my pennies for replacement pigtails having exhausted this month's Volvo budget.
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Old 07-24-2020, 04:24 PM   #160
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Old 08-05-2020, 11:04 PM   #161
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Just my luck: One of the water pump studs backed out just enough that I couldn't squeeze a 6-point or 12-point wrench or even a rotary cut-off wheel onto the nut. All attempts to use a open-end or locking pliers succeeded in deforming the nut further.

I took a little 6" hacksaw and began hacking off enough of the stud so I could squeeze a wrench over it. It took two days (I found out I bought the wrong blade size after Home Depot closed for the day) and two blades, but I successfully hacked off about 1/8" off the end of the stud, which was enough clearance that I could fit a 6-point wrench onto the deformed mess of the hex nut.




Seriously, having a 6-point wrench made removing the nuts so stupidly easy. Worth the $7 I paid. I wouldn't bother with anything else.


Boy, I sure made a mess of this one. Will be ordering new ones this weekend when I go down to LA for a trip to McMaster-Carr and a date.



I also repurposed a bit of old radiator hose to make this neat little blade guard based on something I read in Popular Mechanics. I'll probably regret hacking up this one since none of the local shops stocked it and I had to order the new one off Amazon.



In other news I've slathered enough Naval Jelly on the battery tray area to clean up just a bit of the corrosion. I'll keep working at it, but I'll definitely have whoever handles the body work replace that when they repaint the engine bay.



Next step: figuring out how to release tension on the drive belts.
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Old 08-10-2020, 03:04 AM   #162
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No major updates. Went on a date & picked up the locking M6 nuts for the water pump studs @ McMaster-Carr, slept, woke up early for F1, and spent most of the day scrubbing the oily buildup off my timing belt cover. I will need to get a few extra fan studs since these are in pretty gross shape. Put it back on the car while I did some cleaning in & around the garage. Timing belt looks much better than I thought for 53k miles, but maybe someone changed it and never put the sticker on? Oh well, I might as well change it now...



Did some snooping and found out how I could slacken the drive belts. That was easy.

Will be referring to http://www.forums.turbobricks.com/sh...d.php?t=204038 and the Bentley manual.
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Old 08-14-2020, 02:43 AM   #163
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Water pump came off with a bit of prying to reveal a real mess underneath. I'll not make any statements about the previous mechanic's work and let the pictures do the talking. Seems I made the right call to swap this out.









I'm still short two fan clutch studs because I figured I'd reuse them. I think I'll not.
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Old 08-31-2020, 04:53 AM   #164
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No major updates. Poked a boroscope into the cylinders to check for debris (thought part of the spark plug wire holder fell in). No plastic, just lots of build up.
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Old 09-19-2020, 12:56 AM   #165
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Finally, some time to get caught up. I wasn't strong enough to break the crank pulley bolt loose, but my Milwaukee impact did a nice job of it. Very much a splurge, but it was worth it. Timing belt had seen better days.



Of course, the requisite cleaning pics.






Some of the seals had seen better days and I think that camshaft seal should be further back. It was also rock hard.





Look, you can see the distributor timing mark on the rear timing belt cover.







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Old 09-23-2020, 12:32 AM   #166
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Notes: A 1" PVC coupler is the perfect size for driving in oiled camshaft & intermediate seals. Works better than the adjustable rental tool from Autozone.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/1-in-Sch...-010/100343722

Looks like I'll need to try something different to drive in the crankshaft seal.
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Old 09-25-2020, 02:49 PM   #167
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Turns out I was dumb and you can indeed hammer in the crankshaft seal with a 2" PVC coupler, ideally with a matching cap, and a rubber mallet. Total cost: About $7 ($4 PVC + $2.50 hammer).

It's a little deeper on one side but well within the 0.25" margin called out in the Bentley - it just drives my inner perfectionist mad seeing it. Still need to get under and tap in the bottom side of the seal just a tad more.
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Old 09-26-2020, 05:46 PM   #168
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snailmale View Post
Turns out I was dumb and you can indeed hammer in the crankshaft seal with a 2" PVC coupler, ideally with a matching cap, and a rubber mallet. Total cost: About $7 ($4 PVC + $2.50 hammer).

It's a little deeper on one side but well within the 0.25" margin called out in the Bentley - it just drives my inner perfectionist mad seeing it. Still need to get under and tap in the bottom side of the seal just a tad more.
You can still order some of the seal drivers for these for relatively cheap if you can find em. If not you can always PM me and I can rent one out to you. I’ve got the installer for every oil seal on the B21/23/230 engines.
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Old 10-05-2020, 11:54 PM   #169
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Looking good bro! I logged in just to see how you were doing I have always been gentle on ring seals, don't want to damage them... A giant socket works as well as abs coupler but the ABS has more face contact and is waaay cheaper. Good call!
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Old 10-07-2020, 01:19 AM   #170
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Looking good bro! I logged in just to see how you were doing I have always been gentle on ring seals, don't want to damage them... A giant socket works as well as abs coupler but the ABS has more face contact and is waaay cheaper. Good call!
Thanks for the words of encouragement! :D

In other news:

Started laying out the Dave Barton harness. It's not pictured in this photo, but I used green tape to tag the different 2 & 3 pole connectors while it was laid out in the exact orientation in the photos. Much easier than scrambling to identify and plug stuff in.



I also cleaned up the alternator and part of the block. I'm using Walmart's Engine Degreaser, which smells suspiciously like the shower cleaner I've been using for the other engine parts. Hard to believe this car was once something I planned to scrap if it failed smog, but that was before BringATrailer started auctioning these off for silly money...


My new job just informed me that I am to start in three months, so now I have a target to aim for.
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Old 10-07-2020, 07:31 AM   #171
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I'm glad you didn't scrap it!. This car is coming along so nicely, and the progress is satisfying to watch. Keep it up!
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Old 10-17-2020, 09:55 PM   #172
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Finally got my Dave Barton/Elbert Bos harness installed on the engine-side. Still need to order the passenger-side barrel connectors.






It helped to lay it out on the floor as in the picture and mark off the 2/3-wire connectors with tape, which took out all the guesswork and having to orient/re-orient the guide while putting it on. I also had a copy of the greenbook page identifying the block connections (Hiperfauto has one on the forum) marked up with what was what for my B21FT. Prep matters! Made the job so easy that I only broke the junction block cover because I suddenly wanted to re-route the positive battery cable.



My order of operations: Alternator spade (D+), Alternator B, Oil Pressure Senders, harness clamps (took forever getting these on...), CPR, block-mounted connectors, starter connections, and then the ignition coil/relay. Worked pretty well, though snaking my hand under the exhaust manifold heat shield was harder than it should. It helped that the engine had most of its ancillaries peeled back until it was near-longblock state, which made accessing stuff very easy.


As someone who used to design wiring harnesses for a living, I was very impressed with the build quality and engineering that went into this harness. Lengths are just about perfect (would have appreciated an inch less of the alternator D+ cable) and the connectors are nice & solid stuff. Time will tell if it lasts longer than the original one did anyway.






Some gorilla glue and Tamiya putty made the junction block cover look presentable again. I'll give it a coat of black to finish it off.





Last edited by snailmale; 10-17-2020 at 10:01 PM..
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Old 10-24-2020, 10:09 PM   #173
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Got a second chance to make some progress on the car this weekend. Spent Monday cleaning up some of the 15W-40 I spilled on the garage and I spent most of the week trimming two of the vacuum lines because the clamps were too close to the new harness than I would have preferred. My date this weekend got cancelled due to work - a disappointment, but this gives me time to get caught up.

A cup brush and brake cleaner did great work breaking up the dirt on the crankshaft pulley hub and locating plates. Simple Green and 1500-grit paper did the rest.

I exercised great caution when cleaning the crankshaft gear to avoid marring any of the mating surfaces. For those I only used a rag with copious spurts of Simple Green with the aim of cleaning between the teeth.



Also planning to cross the water pump job off the list this weekend using this tutorial: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dS67kZYpksI




Please excuse the mess, I assure you it was all cleaned to a satisfactory standard. Nothing scares me more than FOD going in the engine...
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Old 10-25-2020, 10:52 PM   #174
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Well, I was all set to install my shiny new HEPU water pump, but then I found out I was short one M6x1.0-30mm long bolt, so FYI: they send out B230 hardware kits with all the pumps. A little disappointing, but I then remembered I never cleaned out the gunk on the top mating surface so I could at least get that done.
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Old 10-26-2020, 09:22 PM   #175
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Wow! You’re really bringing a ton of life back to this one! I love all that you’ve done, it’s very satisfying and cheap to simply clean all these small parts you have done and the outcome is worth it tenfold.
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