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Old 03-03-2011, 04:26 PM   #26
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Ahhh yea that sentence makes more sense the second time around.
lol I had the same slip up.
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Old 03-05-2011, 12:49 AM   #27
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So, on to the work at hand...

These write-ups will be a bit out of order chronologically, but the main goal is catching up with current progress, since I started this thread a bit late in the game.

The 242 had a shaky (hunting) idle ever since I bought it but it still ran OK most of the time. It would idle fine for about 10 seconds, and then bog down and feel like it was about to die for about 5 seconds, at which point the cycle would repeat. Occasionally I would poke around and try to diagnose the problem, usually without much success. It did teach me a lot about k-jet in the process though, and I kind of have a fond appreciation for it because of its wonderful mix of precision mechanical metering and Malaise-era electronic tomfoolery. It's amazing to me that the system works at all!

Anyways, first up was the ECU harness at the firewall. After reading that this was a common failure point for this era of Volvos I investigated and found my car did not escape the harness rot. Fortunately, the main engine harness had already been replaced with the factory Volvo upgrade, so no worries there.

Unwrapping the harness that runs through the firewall revealed this mess


old_wires by Chris Floren, on Flickr

I scrounged around for some suitable replacement wire, bought some nice non-insulated crimp connectors and heat shrink, and went to town on it. I replaced as much as possible, pulling the harness through to the engine compartment to make sure I was splicing into the non-cooked good stuff that spent its time living under the dash.

looking better...


IMG_1082 by Chris Floren, on Flickr

Bullet connectors were removed from the big gray block and spliced onto the new wires, heat-shrunk, then carefully re-inserted into the block because it's very brittle


connector_splices by Chris Floren, on Flickr

A bit of electrical tape to wrap the harness and it went back together. Unfortunately, problem not solved. Idle was still very iffy. I replaced the microswitch under the TB that tells the constant idle computer that the throttle is closed, but that didn't help much either. I bought a generic $5 Philmore switch that's around the right size instead of paying $60 for the correct part or scrounging through junkyards hoping to find a k-jet car.

Fuel filter replacement had no effect either. I think this problem was quite the conundrum for the PO; my guess is he didn't feel comfortable being stumped by a Volvo so he sold it.

Around this time, I also realized that it would miss under full load, pretty badly actually. I guess I really didn't drive it much for the 4 or 5 months that it wasn't registered.

I did all of the CIS voltage checks in the greenbooks, and both ECU's checked out fine. Hmm...how about them fuel pumps...

Last edited by Duder; 12-03-2017 at 08:18 PM..
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Old 03-05-2011, 01:24 AM   #28
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When I finally poked my head under the car with a flashlight, I could see something was amiss in fuel pump land. The "sled" that the main pump rides on was barely hanging on by 2 bolts and there were quite a few zip ties and drips of fuel. I jumpered the pumps at the fuse panel and found that the in-tank pump was DOA and the main pump was on its way out. That explained the grumpy sound that would emanate from under the back seat.

Probable culprit found; now to decide on replacements. I didn't want to touch the pumps again for a long time so I figured I'd better build in capacity for my planned power goals.

I posted this thread asking for recommendations in my particular situation: http://forums.turbobricks.com/showthread.php?t=224579

I had to make sure the new pumps would work (for a while at least) with the B21F running k-jet.

Time for some math:

Eventual max crank power goal: 400hp
BSFC assumed worst-case: 0.65

Fuel flowrate required = hp x BSFC = 260 lb/hr = 186 L/hr of gasoline.

Fuel pressure required = base pressure + total boost (est) + pumping losses (est)
= 43.5 + 25 + 5 = 73.5 psi

The above was calculated considering the future B230FT making somewhere around 400hp, which gave me a reasonable maximum limit to consider. I know it will take some work to get there!

One of my co-workers gave me a neat old K-Jet booklet from 1979 after he saw my car. On page 4 we learn that the naturally-aspirated k-jet main pump is regulated to 110 L/hr @ 5 bar. So I that gave me a lower end limit to work with. In the beginning of the booklet, we also learn that "your advantage" is "the K-jetronic from Bosch," also that k-jet is "forward-looking!" Swell.

Here's some fuel pump geekery, compiled from a variety of different sources (not my data):


Pumps@13.5V by Chris Floren, on Flickr

The following is copied from my fuel pump thread:

"I don't know how much trust to put in these curves; the data was taken from many different sources so there may not be a true correspondence between pumps due to variations in test method, test rig setup, instrumentation used, and so on. But it's all I've got for now.

As you can see, the popular Walbros and Bosch options are shown along with the new Deatschwerks in-tank pump and a few options from Aeromotive. The light green line near the top, "Walbro 255 x2 in series" was taken from some testing done by AMS. They were comparing various single pumps to others mounted in parallel, and others in series. Since I want to try the series setup (i.e. stock Volvo layout) for now to keep it simple, that's what I was interested in. I know that two 044s in parallel will give me enough fuel to make one million horsepowers, but I'm being realistic (for now) and saying my car will eventually make 300-400hp at the crank. So looking at the two 255s in series, I saw that the flow stays much more constant as pressure rises when compared to the single 255HP. I was disregarding actual flow values and looking at the slope of the curve...between 40 - 90 psi, the single 255HP loses almost 30 gal/hr whereas the two 255HPs in series only lose 12 to 13 gal/hr.

From there I assumed that since a single 044 apparently can flow very similarly to two 255HPs in series, why not put a 255HP in series with an 044 and bump that curve up even further? I don't know exactly how to calculate the theoretical performance of two pumps in series given the curve for each pump individually, so I didn't want to speculate on what that would look like...just assuming that it should be better than the single 044.

The four single points near the bottom of the graph show what my engine(s) might need in operation. I read somewhere (?) that the stock K-jet system puts out 140 L/hr @ 5bar, so that's represented by the grey X. The other three estimate turbo'd performance with a lot of educated guesses and theoretical calculated boost pressure, all at 6000rpm. Purple diamond is what might happen when I swap in the B230FT running LH2.4 making 300bhp. Teal square uses the same assumptions at 400bhp target. Orange triangle assumes worst-case BSFC of 0.65 for the 400bhp target, so I figured that would be my worst-case fueling requirement. You can't get me lucky charms!

Now I know that all of these points lie well below even what a single 044 can do, but I'm thinking that even with stellar wiring the fuel system will still have some restriction which will increase demand from the pumps to meet the required pressure at the fuel rail. Also, all this data is at 13.5V; I'll have to see what they end up running at voltage-wise but I'd assume it's going to be lower unless my charging system and wiring are phenomenal, which they aren't. Call it a Volvo-Wiring-Safety-Factor (VWSF)."

So the decision was made to go with a Walbro 255HP in-tank, feeding a Bosch 044 main pump, for these reasons:
1) both pumps should fit in the '81 242 with minimal modifications
2) the combination of 255hp in series with the 044 should (I think) help to maintain fuel flow as pressure is increased, i.e. flatten out the total flow-vs-pressure curve to be more consistent than either pump would be by itself.

Last edited by Duder; 12-03-2017 at 08:19 PM..
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Old 03-05-2011, 01:40 AM   #29
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Sounds like a great combo. I would check out the Jay Racing 044 pump. RvolvoR bought one and I'm about to. Supposed to be a bit better pump for the same price.
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Old 03-05-2011, 01:45 AM   #30
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The actual installation was pretty straightforward but took a while considering time lost to choose and procure lines, adapters and fittings that I needed.

This is what I found when I ripped the "main" pump out from under the car: a cruddy too-small pump from some other Volvo, that had been rattling around in the original bracket.


Crappy_incorrect_LH_pump by Chris Floren, on Flickr

The original in-tank pump was verified dead with a power supply. The old brown sock crumbled when I touched it. I gave it all a proper Viking funeral. Waaah-woooow.

On the bright side, the tank is perfect inside!! No rust or crud or anything! Way better than I expected.


Clean_tank_1 by Chris Floren, on Flickr

I bought the 255HP and the 044 from ATP turbo.

To install the 255HP in-tank, I did the following:
  • Ground down the ribs on the ID of the plastic pump sleeve to fit the Walbro, using a dremel & cartridge roll
  • Shortened the pick-up tube by 1/2" or so
  • Hose-clamped the plastic sleeve around the pump body
  • Used SAE 30R10 submersible hose, 2" long, with 2 hose clamps to plumb it in
  • Ordered a connector & pigtail from Summit
  • Grounded the pigtail to the original ground screw
  • Soldered the +12V lead to the underside of the sending unit

The modified plastic sleeve works great in conjunction with a hose clamp:


Walbro_soldered_2 by Chris Floren, on Flickr

The full sending unit assembled, with sock


Complete_in-tank_setup_1 by Chris Floren, on Flickr

...Bosch 044 install write-up to follow...

Last edited by Duder; 12-03-2017 at 08:19 PM..
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Old 03-05-2011, 01:47 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by scottyd View Post
Sounds like a great combo. I would check out the Jay Racing 044 pump. RvolvoR bought one and I'm about to. Supposed to be a bit better pump for the same price.
Thanks. I did see the super-special-o modified 044 on Jay Racing's site, but decided on a standard 044 and got it from ATP who is a direct Bosch distributor. I'll post the install writeup tomorrow, complete with re-wire job necessitated by smoky melty fuse panel and relay (they no likey 15A of current anymore).
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Old 03-05-2011, 04:52 PM   #32
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The sending unit went back into the tank with a new o-ring. Installing the Bosch 044 pump was the next job and was pretty straightforward once I had all the parts together.

I mounted it on the original fuel pump sled with the original bracket. I retained the accumulator in the system in an attempt to keep k-jet happy with steady fuel pressure until it gets ousted. This required a bit of trickery, in that the inverted flare fitting on the accumulator inlet is apparently not easy to find.

Earl's Plumbing "store #1" (where Earl himself first opened shop) is just a few miles up the street from me. I took the 044 & accumulator mounted on the sled, and explained what I wanted to do. The shop is basically an Earl's distributor now but they do have just about everything, albeit overpriced. After a bit of head scratching they took the original inverted flare-to-hose barb fitting and crimped on a teflon line and crimped a -6 collar to the other end. At first the line was about 12" long and had to loop around but with a bit of accumulator "clocking" in its bracket I found a way to shorten the line without the need for sharp bends. It would have been too short in the original configuration; basically I just rotated the accumulator about 180 deg. to swap the inlet & outlet locations.

Here's the final setup:


Bosch_044_&_NA_K-jet_Accumulator_3 by Chris Floren, on Flickr

The inlet is a 1/2" hose bead to -8 female, coupled with a -8 male to M18 x 1.5 adapter threaded into the pump, with a crush washer. I used the check valve that came on the pump with a 12mm banjo fitting to the -6 line. In the pic above, the acorn nut to clamp the banjo fitting is missing. I was able to buy one separately from 034 Motorsport for a few bucks, although I'm sure I could've found one in the junkyards, too. The accumulator is connected back up to the stock fuel lines up to the engine. On the NA k-jet cars the filter is on the firewall, and I kinda like it there because it's easily accessible. Future fuel needs may dictate removing the accumulator and routing new larger hard lines to the engine but at least the pumps will be up to the task.

I ran a new 1/2" length of hose from the sending unit to the 044, and remounted the sled using new rubber isolator donguses.


All installed, no leaks


Complete_main_pump_install_1 by Chris Floren, on Flickr


Stock line from accumulator to filter tightened up


Complete_main_pump_install_2 by Chris Floren, on Flickr

I started the car and let it idle for a bit to check the pumps and they were both running nicely. After a minute of idling my girlfriend noticed some smoke wafting up from the driver's side of the dash. Damn...just as I suspected: the 044 overloaded the original main pump wiring circuit. The fuse panel was starting to "brown" nicely around the #7 fuse, and the fuel pump relay connector got a bit melty.

Solution: re-wire the main pump with a fused 10-ga supply directly connected to the battery, 10-ga ground to the chassis, and a Bosch-style SPDT 20/30A foglight relay to flip the switch. I scored a nice relay connector from the local electronics shop and wired it all up with copious amounts of zipties. The wiring scheme was copied from the DSM vfaq website and is set up like this:

Term. 30: +12V lead (10-ga wire from battery)
Term. 85: Ground (to OE chassis ground point)
Term. 87: +12V to pump (10-ga)
Term. 87A: not used
Term. 86: signal from OE pump relay (formerly pump +12V supply)

Set up this way, the original fuse panel, wiring circuit and fuel pump relay see almost no load. All they have to do now is energize the new relay.
The 044 is grounded directly to the same ground point under the seat, with 10-ga wire.

Spaghetti under the back seat


Main_pump_under_seat_wiring by Chris Floren, on Flickr

I drilled a hole in the little shelf that the seat rests on, used an M5 bolt & nut to secure the relay, and then cut & reinstalled the rubber welting. It gives the relay a nice protected little place to hide, and it can't vibrate and fail this way.


Relay is not going anywhere


Main_pump_relay_mounted by Chris Floren, on Flickr

Results: the B21F idles better than ever before. Not like new, still a bit of vibration but it's very steady now with no hunting or bogging down. The engine finally pulls cleanly up to redline at WOT. I can now use all of the meager power it makes, at least in a straight line anyways. In hard cornering, any throttle application will lead to inside wheelspin. Yaaay, open diff!

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Old 03-05-2011, 09:21 PM   #33
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1) Have you seafomed this beast?
2) Have you changed the motor mounts?
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Old 03-05-2011, 09:51 PM   #34
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Quote:
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sometimes I miss my car having that frontend. I like the coffinhood
coffinhood rules give the car a more pronounced front end...
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Old 03-05-2011, 10:35 PM   #35
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coffinhood rules give the car a more pronounced front end...
I agree fo sho. I don't think a flathood is ever in my car's future. not that I dislike flathoods (jen's 242 is a flathood) but just not something I want for my car. I do wish I still had the black inserts under my headlights and a turbo black grille centre though, I smashed mine to bits on the back end of a crappy econobox before I knew how awesome they were.
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Old 03-05-2011, 11:03 PM   #36
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I agree fo sho. I don't think a flathood is ever in my car's future. not that I dislike flathoods (jen's 242 is a flathood) but just not something I want for my car. I do wish I still had the black inserts under my headlights and a turbo black grille centre though, I smashed mine to bits on the back end of a crappy econobox before I knew how awesome they were.
Early quad e-codes go very well with coffin hood...

like this


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Old 03-06-2011, 02:26 AM   #37
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1) Have you seafomed this beast?
2) Have you changed the motor mounts?
1) Not yet, but it couldn't hurt to try. It does have fairly new plugs & wires, and the throttle body and injectors were cleaned before I bought it (I believe the receipt from an independent shop)

2) 50% yes. I did the passenger's side and that helped. Haven't gotten around to doing the driver's side yet.
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Old 03-06-2011, 02:27 AM   #38
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coffinhood rules give the car a more pronounced front end...
I'm rockin' it, bro
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Old 03-06-2011, 11:00 PM   #39
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I would chinese torture it.
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Old 03-10-2011, 05:45 PM   #40
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I'm home sick today, so what better way to be semi-productive than to update my project thread??

The following is a flashback to about 10 months ago...

After looking into various engine options, I decided to go with a late-model squirter block B230FT. One main attraction vs. a +T setup was that I could potentially get it certified as a smog-legal swap and not worry about "befriending" the local smog check guys. I found a complete '93 engine advertised by 2manyturbos but I was too late...it was gone. But he did have a '94 as well. It's a California-emissions spec engine, which is a requirement to get the swap certified since the car is an original CA-spec vehicle.

He palletized the B230FT very well, securely mounted by the bellhousing and motor mounts. I picked it up from a local freight terminal in my trusty '86 Toyota pickup.

Engine still in 940, before it was pulled:


1994 B230FT by Chris Floren, on Flickr

Here it is as-received:


B230FT_R_side by Chris Floren, on Flickr


242, meet your new engine.


B230FT_meets_242 by Chris Floren, on Flickr
(yes, that's two sweet '80s beige-mobiles in the same driveway)


I had to get creative when unloading this lump. The forklift guy at the terminal pushed the pallet up ahead of the rear axle, per my request. Getting it back out was not as simple since I don't have a convenient forklift and my engine hoist wouldn't reach that far into the bed, even with the tailgate flopped all the way down. So there sat the 242, being all heavy & stuff...a-ha! Let's use the weight to our advantage. I strapped the pallet to the rear tow hook of the 242, and just drove the 'yota forward...

Voila.


Yanking_it_out by Chris Floren, on Flickr


Which made it easy to get it up on the hoist and into the garage.


B230FT_on_hoist by Chris Floren, on Flickr


It will be a while yet before I get back to the B230FT and start the swap. The Toyota in the pics needs some work, so I'll do that first and use it as the DD while I'm tearing into the 242 for reals.

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Old 03-10-2011, 06:14 PM   #41
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Unplanned side project:

A few months ago I was scrounging the local junkyards when I happened upon a fairly nice '83 242 turbo. It was sad, because it was a cash-for-clunkers car with a sodium-silicate killed engine (green spraypaint gave it away). The interior was "meh," and I was too lazy to pull the side glass or doors off. It did however have a very nice black headliner and some sunroof parts I needed. So I ripped that stuff out and did some interior work on my 242.

You can see why I was tempted by the idea of a clean black headliner




And here she is.




Best way to remove 240 (non-wagon) headliners is to remove the back window. Worked well for me. Remove outer trim, soap up the rubber seal, get inside and push with your feet.




While I'm at it, might as well clean out the sunroof tray and repaint the steel where the original paint is peeling




Some shop vac, wire-wheel and sandpaper action gave me this:




Painted with three coats of "Master Series" silver moisture-curing urethane. VW guys swear by this stuff for rust prevention. Supposed to be better than POR15.




Gluing the junkyard front seal into the body, with clear silicone RTV and some clamps:




Scraping away at the sunroof mechanism front cover panel




Front cover panel got 2 coats of Master Series and some "biscuit" colored appliance epoxy.

Everything back together




On the inside too.




Installing the headliner itself was straightforward. The time-consuming part was gluing the vinyl edge around the sunroof opening. That was accomplished using Weldwood contact cement and a great deal of paper clips to hold everything until it cured. Didn't come out 100% perfect, but it all looks much better than before. As you can see I scored all the black hardware too: visors, sunroof crank bezel, mirror surround, and grab handles. Bye-bye, crappy yellowed and stained formerly-white stuff.

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Old 03-10-2011, 06:28 PM   #42
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Also recently I took the time to de-funkify the carpet, while it was out for the fuel pump rewire job. The Bissell "Little Green Machine" steam cleaner did wonders on the old brown fuzz. Just fill 'er up with hot water & solution, spray, scrub, and vacuum up the guk.

Cue the side-by-side comparison! On the right you have your "30 years of funk" look, and on the left, so fresh and so clean!


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Old 03-10-2011, 06:52 PM   #43
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Wait. The Jetta is red?!
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Old 03-10-2011, 06:57 PM   #44
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Wait. The Jetta is red?!
You know it! So is the girl who drives it!

(Fiancee is a ginger...)
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Old 03-10-2011, 07:00 PM   #45
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Oh you're screwed boy. They be crazy.
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Old 03-10-2011, 07:38 PM   #46
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Oh you're screwed boy. They be crazy.
Mine's not too bad. I found a good one.

See, not crazy at all:


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Old 03-14-2011, 09:52 PM   #47
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I love beige 2 door bricks.
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Old 03-14-2011, 10:07 PM   #48
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I approve of both reds, and the progress on the car. Making a really clean car even cleaner, I highly approve. Nicely done sir.
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Old 03-15-2011, 01:06 PM   #49
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I love beige 2 door bricks.
Me too! I plan to keep this one completely "under the radar." Something satisfying about the thought of hauling ass in a car that looks like a secretary or your grandfather would own it...

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I approve of both reds, and the progress on the car. Making a really clean car even cleaner, I highly approve. Nicely done sir.
Thanks...the aim now is to make a slow car faster, and a wallowy car handle!
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Old 03-22-2011, 11:12 PM   #50
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Gratuitous TDI pics, since Scotty seems to have a crush on it:



Look at dat ass!




It feels quick, but 0-60 is only in the mid-8's. Getting the 242 to be faster than the gf's DD will be a nice step! I'll have to get her to stoplight drag me to prove it though.

All the torque sure makes it fun, and 50mpg on longer trips ain't bad either.
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