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Old 07-09-2020, 12:17 PM   #26
R32RennSport
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Great work so far! Looking forward to hearing about your adventures!
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Old 07-09-2020, 10:07 PM   #27
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Today was pretty productive. I made the mounting brackets for the A/C condenser.





They're in the oven with some black Hammerite paint curing. Once I get an electric fan mounted to the condenser I can install the assembly.
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Old 07-10-2020, 05:10 PM   #28
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Thanks for posting all of this. I've been a little unmotivated with my 145, but your thread got me back up and moving again.
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Old 07-11-2020, 12:38 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrv6a View Post
Thanks for posting all of this. I've been a little unmotivated with my 145, but your thread got me back up and moving again.
Wow. Very cool. I've never thought of my automotive activities as being a motivator for someone else.

I ordered up an electric fan from Amazon yesterday. It should arrive in a few days. Once in hand I'll make mounting brackets and install the condenser assembly.

I'm starting to think about the A/C plumbing. I'm considering mounting the receiver drier way
up front on the passenger side of the condenser. Out of sight for a cleaner look. I'm researching charge fittings now. If I can find a clean block or blocks for the charge fittings that will be a big help.

Anybody have any suggestions?
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Old 07-11-2020, 08:41 AM   #30
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Nice wagon! Looks like it's in good overall shape bodywise - perhaps a respray at some point? Looks like overspray on the door latch deflector/guide in one pic. Haven't owned a 140 since the 80's - I do recall the fun & games swapping 240 interior & trim parts and dealing with SAE/Metric overlap to make things work though.

Since you are going to the trouble of installing AC, I would suggest you use the accumulator/orifice tube and NOT the receiver/drier / expansion valve setup. It never did provide the best cooling. You can buy aftermarket orifice tube (Cold Hose, Nostalgic AC, Vintage AIr, etc.) assemblies that can be crimped into the #6 line, in place of the R/D.

The only thing I noticed in all the excellent bringing-it-up-to-snuff work you've done is the use of standard hose clamps on the fuel rail & injector hoses. I would suggest that is a bad idea long term. If they haven't already cut into the new hose, better to replace them with the closed clamps you have used elsewhere in the system, and/or use oetiker clamps, since you won't be touching them on a regular basis anyway.
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Old 07-12-2020, 01:05 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lookforjoe View Post
Nice wagon! Looks like it's in good overall shape bodywise - perhaps a respray at some point? Looks like overspray on the door latch deflector/guide in one pic.
Thank you. Yes, the original owner had a lower body respray to deal with multiple door dings, etc., in single stage about 20 years ago. While decent, I would call that paint work about a twenty footer.


Quote:
Originally Posted by lookforjoe View Post
The only thing I noticed in all the excellent bringing-it-up-to-snuff work you've done is the use of standard hose clamps on the fuel rail & injector hoses. I would suggest that is a bad idea long term. If they haven't already cut into the new hose, better to replace them with the closed clamps you have used elsewhere in the system, and/or use oetiker clamps, since you won't be touching them on a regular basis anyway.
Xlnt observation. I too very much prefer the NORMA clamps over the typical US-style slotted screw clamps for the reasons that you have mentioned. I also like the spring loaded Oeticker screw clamps that maintain constant tension. When I started on the underhood effort it was simply to deal with the perished motor mounts. I had already ordered all of the miscellaneous bits and pieces (including all new NORMA hose clamps for the coolant lines) when I decided to renew the fuel lines. Basically I was too cheap to place another order for just the fuel line hose clamps so I used what I had on hand. I didn't want to pay as much for shipping the clamps as the cost of the clamps! I have since ordered up a fresh stock of NORMA clamps to keep on hand and replaced the slotted clamps.

As an aside it may be worth noting why most OEMs use spring clamps wherever possible on hoses:
1) Reliability. Spring clamps provide a reliable sealing force once installed. The sealing pressure of screw clamps is dependent on the tightening torque applied by the person on the assembly line doing the installation. Too loose and the hose leaks. Too tight and the hose can be damaged, or worse, the screw stripped leaving the connection unreliable.
2) Cost. Simple wire or stamped flat spring steel clamps are the cheapest, both in terms of part cost and labor cost, yet still effective way to ensure reliable sealing upon installation and eliminate human error WRT tightness.

Just something to think about the next time you're removing one of those cheap spring clamps and cursing the difficulty when using a pair of pliers.


Quote:
Originally Posted by lookforjoe View Post
Since you are going to the trouble of installing AC, I would suggest you use the accumulator/orifice tube and NOT the receiver/drier / expansion valve setup. It never did provide the best cooling. You can buy aftermarket orifice tube (Cold Hose, Nostalgic AC, Vintage AIr, etc.) assemblies that can be crimped into the #6 line, in place of the R/D.

Good suggestion and one that I had not considered. I'm going through the flush process on the compressor and evaporator this week. I'll take a look at packaging constraints and take a look at this option. The cost of an accumulator and orifice tube are certainly within reason.

FYI another xlnt source in addition to the hot rod aftermarket A/C suppliers is Arizona Mobile Air. Very helpful and a large selection of generic components.


Very nice looking MR2. You might appreciate checking out my friend's mid-engine toy, Midlana.
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Old 07-18-2020, 10:37 PM   #32
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I was able to get back to work on the Banana today a bit. The fan came on Wednesday and I was able to draw up some mounting brackets. With the fan in hand I decided that the lower fan-to-condenser bracket could do double duty as the lower condenser-to-body mount as well.


Here's what the fan brackets look like on the condenser:


I tried to minimize it but there is a little bit of air flow blockage. This is mandatory as the fan's mounting tabs are slip fit items that require compression between the fan body and the mounting surface for a secure fit. There are 2 pieces for each mount with the essentially straight piece for each mount being a spacer so that the actual mount has about 0.06" clearance to the condenser surface to minimize the risk of long term abrasion and subsequent failure of the condenser.

Here's the whole rig assembled ready for installation:


And installed. The brackets to mount the condenser use existing Volvo screw locations with the radiator mounting bolts and the lower front valance inner screws doing the job for the condenser. I replaced the radiator mounting bolts with 3" long studs with about 2" of the studs sticking through the radiator core support towards the grille. I cut tube nuts to length and installed them on the front side to set the fore/aft position of the condenser and also secure the stud so that the radiator and/or condenser and be removed independently.


The original radiator duct cover fits back in place just as it came from the factory:


Next up is to fit up the pulleys and fabricate a mount bracket for the Sanden style compressor.
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Old 08-07-2020, 11:07 PM   #33
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I had some time available today so I rebuilt the Pick-A-Part HVAC assembly I pulled from the '89 240 sedan donor a few weeks back. The rebuild / overhaul consisted of a new heater core, blower and expansion valve along with cleaning everything up. I also flushed and pressure checked the evaporator along with new o-ring seals. Hopefully all of the old crud has been washed away. I re-coated the exposed copper plumbing at the evaporator and expansion valve using the 2" wide bituminous insulation tape that my local radiator shop uses for such things. If you haven't had the opportunity to work with that stuff, all I can say is that it sure is sticky!

The temperature is supposed to stay cool here, in the mid 80s, for the weekend. So tomorrow I'll start on the installation. I.e. I'll remove the dash and see how far I get on the new installation. I need it to be mobile on Monday to get back to work! Scope creep has set in even before starting. I bought several rolls of foil backed insulation, both thermal and acoustic. Since I'm removing the seats and carpet to make it nice and roomy while I'm removing the dash, there won't be a better time for that upgrade. Your basic 'While I'm in there.....' addition to the project.
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Old 08-12-2020, 01:46 AM   #34
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Quote:
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[...] there won't be a better time for that upgrade. Your basic 'While I'm in there.....' addition to the project.
That's how the best projects work, I'm afraid.

I'm very pleased to see this car has ended up in the hands of a true craftsman. I well recall my reaction to the Craigslist ad, that such an original gem won't be for sale for long. I didn't expect anyone would have dared buy it sight unseen, but with every post you make, it becomes more and more obvious you made the right decision. Congrats!

PS. That's a helluva disk sander you've got in your metal shop...
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Old 08-12-2020, 01:17 PM   #35
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Great work! I have a soft spot for yellow 140s so I'll be watching the build and adventure closely.
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Old 08-13-2020, 01:24 AM   #36
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Thank you for the kind words to both Toybox and Coupid.


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That's a helluva disk sander you've got in your metal shop... \
If you look closely there are 2 of them; The smaller is an 18" diameter and the big fella is a 24" diameter. We call them disc mills! You always want to be very careful with them as the motors for both are fractional Hp and the discs themselves weigh 20 and 31 lbs respectively so there is a lot of stored rotational kinetinc energy in them once they are up to speed. They spin freely for several minutes after the power is turned OFF. When the 40 grit sanding discs are fresh they will remove metal in a big hurry!


I got back to work in the HVAC project this past weekend, installing the 'new' rebuilt combined module from the '89 donor car. I'm very glad to have had the initial experience of removing the unit from the junkyard car. . I used the info, pictures and advise provided by Polaris as a guide. Kudos for the insight.

I considered using the entire lower panel setup from the '89 car but finally decided against it for 3 distinct reasons:
1) I would have had to relocate the dash lamp dimmer rheostat
2) I want to retain the original '73 appearance
3) I need 7 switch slots and the later cars only have 6 by virtue of the relocated cigarette lighter / power port socket on the new cars. Besides the normal hazard flasher, rear window defrost, and rear window wiper switches I also have switches for the driving lights, O/D on-off, intermittent windshield wiper control and the new A/C potentiometer.

During the changeover I found some interesting evolutionary changes to the combined unit from my '73 to the '89 unit.
1) The little spring/snap clips that hold the blower turbine housings and main body halves together are much nicer on the later cars as the newer style has return flanges on both sides that make them much easier to get on/off and easier to reuse.
2) The hot water valve is much simpler on the new unit. I actually prefer the old style as I think it may provide better thermal modulation. but I am sure that it is also quite a bit more expensive. So I'm guessing that the bean counters told the engineers that better is the enemy of good enough!
3) The firewall inlet outlet port manifold is a different configuration with different mounting screw location. It requires a couple of new holes to be drilled in the firewall. See pics below:

The later 240 style firewall heater hose manifold in the simple straight configuration on the left and the '73 configuration is on the right.


This pic shows the different mounting hole spacing between the 250 manifold (left) and 140 version (right). The firewall thru-hole spacing for the water ports is identical on both manifolds.


This pic shows the 2 new mounting screw holes with the original holes covered/sealed with duct tape.

4) The '89 combined module incorporates a plastic vacuum reservoir in the lower support / mount bracket. The '73 system uses a kind of oval shape metal tank mounted separately from the combined unit behind the defrost/outer face vent ducting and glove box, above the passenger footwell.


The 240 style vacuum reservoir, above.


The 140-style sort of shiny black metal oval-shaped vacuum reservoir can be seen behind the footwell vent in this pic, above. Note the cute little whitish plastic bellows for controlling the vacuum operated duct flaps/valves. These are the 140 style vs the diaphragm-disc style used on the later cars.

5) While the upper mounts to the cowl are identical on both the 140 and 240 combined units, the lower mount that incorporates the vacuum reservoir mount on the 240 is different and requires modification for use on the 140. If you are going to discard the plastic vacuum reservoir the 140 lower mount bracket will mate directly to the 240 combined module and the 140 adapter tabs that mate the aforementioned support bracket to the transmission tunnel will match up perfectly. If however you wish to retain the 240 style plastic vacuum reservoir the combined unit lower support bracket must be modified.


The combined HVAC module lower support bracket as used on the 240, above.


240 style lower support bracket modified to work with 140 style trans tunnel mount tabs. Note 2 changes to this bracket are required to work on the 140:
1) The slotted tab on the left has been folded to a 90deg angle.
2) The right hand tab has had the captive threaded insert punched out and then slotted to mate up to the trans tunnel tab.

6) The 240 heater assy only has a single condensate drain from the evaporator housing vs the 2 drains on the 140 unit. Fortunately the nice molded drain hose has the proper size O.D. to mate perfectly with the passenger side drain hole in the 140 transmission tunnel.


This pic shows the single 240 drain hose on the bottom of the combined unit.


I didn't have the appropriate size rubber plug to close off the unused drain hole in the floor pan. So I used a double layer of duct tape instead.


7) A very handy feature on the 140 vacuum lines for all of the control valve/flappers was this central quick connect coupling. This is not found on the later style cars. It is also worth noting that each of the vacuum hoses is ink print labeled with a number to identify which port they connect to on the 3-pushbutton flow direction control on the dash panel. The pushbutton flow control switch ports have embossed numbers next to each port. This labeling is found on both the 140 and 240 1/8" I.D. vacuum lines.


8) The '73 140 bolt-in black firewall panel on the firewall in the passenger passenger footwell has all of the correct size holes for pass-thru of the A/C hoses already in place. The A/C hoses I scored from the '89 car are properly configured and grommeted to align with the expansion valve and evaporator exit port as well as seal up properly once installed. I will be fabricating new anti-leak hoses once I do the final installation.

Looking back on this portion of the project I am very happy to have had a break in the weather with driveway temperatures in the mid-80s. The heat has returned today with shaded temps in the mid 90s and driveway temps (we have an asphalt drive) well over 100F in the sun.

Next up is mounting the under hood hardware: The compressor mount, compressor, dual row crank pulley, receiver/drier, idler pulley and new water pump cooling fan.
Once that hardware is installed I'll finalize the hose lengths and then fabricate and install the hoses. After that it'll be time to charge the system.


While occasionally trying this was not a difficult job, many parts of it were tedious and sometimes hard to reach. It would have been much fore pleasant to accomplish on a cooler day. But I also have a Lotus Esprit and I know from experience that for every task under the dash on that car one must keep their cell phone handy in case it becomes necessary to have someone else come out to help you extricate yourself from the car; to get back out of the Lotus position! That said, after I was finished and came in the house, my wife looked at my hands, took this pic and asked if the job wasn't, 'death by 1,000 cuts?'
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Old 08-15-2020, 05:18 PM   #37
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What a difference a year makes!

I got back from my morning bike ride and was pretty much gassed. I got to reminiscing about what I was doing one year ago today. So I threw this short video together:

Carmel 2019

Can anyone tell me how to link a video to a post so that it shows up?

Last edited by escondidoron; 09-12-2020 at 02:12 AM..
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Old 08-26-2020, 11:03 PM   #38
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Had some time today and did a bit of underhood A/C preparation. I wanted to move more air thru the radiator than the original fan was capable of motivating. While I have installed a 14" electric pusher in front of the new condenser I wanted to retain an engine driven fan for primary cooling. The aftermarket Flex-A-Lite fan that was on the Bad Banana that the original owner had installed was to wide, front-to-back, to clear the new 2-row belt drive to support a compressor. And there is only 3" clearance between the radiator and water pump so there isn't much room available for an electric puller fan. Taking into account the electrical load that a powerful electric puller fan would add to the system meant that a new higher output alternator would be required. While a new alternator is an option in the future I didn't want to go there just now. Every now and then I manage to keep scope creep in check!

The OEM viscous fan setup is pretty pricey so I started looking at other options and determined that the large diameter (1.8") pilot on the B20 water pump would be an interface issue since 1/2" or 3/4" are the most common fan clutch pilot sizes:


The later B21 / B23 water pumps have one of the smaller pilots as well as a smaller diameter bolt circle so using one of the Aisin fan clutches was not an option. Those clutches are also too long to fit in the limited space between the radiator and water pump. A bit of research showed that Hayden lists a fan clutch, p/n 2558, for the B20. Online review of the specs showed that this fan clutch would mate with the white plastic fan used on later Redblocks. However it was questionable about water pump pilot interface as the Hayden catalog noted that the unit was compatible with both 3/4" and 1/2" pilots. I went forward and ordered thru my local auto parts / machine shop as they would take it back if it didn't fit.

Well, it didn't fit. But a little bit of free time and a slug of aluminum on the lathe allowed me to fabricate an adapter:


The water pump pilot is only about 0.06" proud of the pulley when installed so a very thin spacer would make these parts mate up:

I installed short 5/16-18 studs in the water pump to make it easier to install the fan. This approach makes it mandatory to remove the radiator to R&R the fan. Since I had the radiator out I took this opportunity to install 3/4" wide x 1/2" thick silicone foam tape on the radiator tanks between the vertical faces of the radiator and condenser to minimize air leakage when the electric pusher fan is activated:


And in-situ:


The new fan has about 1/2" clearance to the radiator which should be enough as long as the motor mounts are in good condition:


Most importantly there is now plenty of room for a 2nd row belt drive:


The last week or so the battery has seemed a little weak when starting 1st thing in the morning. I noticed the date label on the battery while I was under the hood. 8 years is pretty good life for a battery:


So on my test drive I stopped by our local Costco and replaced the battery for good measure. Hopefully it'll last another 8 years:


My test drive was successful and the new fan has made a noticeable difference in the temperature gauge rating. It was 95F ambient temperature this afternoon when I went to Costco. Yesterday, with the old setup, the gauge read just at the top of the N (normal) on the gauge at idle in downtown traffic. Now it reads at the bottom of the N under the same conditions. Note this rather subjective comparison was made before installing the new battery with idle voltage reading steady at 13.2 volts in both cases.
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Old 08-28-2020, 10:34 PM   #39
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Progress on this a/c project is coming along slow but steadily. This morning before heading off to the shop I fabricated some fuel lines that will clear the a/c compressor and it's mount bracket. It didn't seem like a good idea to simply use longer flex hoses as the routing would necessarily be near ignition sources. In the event that there is ever a fuel leak that would be a bad combination. So hard lines with secure tie down points are in order.

I used a piece of 3/8" steel brake line I had laying about from another project. My China Freight bender is pretty much just past it's limit for bending this large diameter steel tube. And the tight 1"" radius causes the tubing to collapse if you bend more than about 15-20 degrees of angle. To get around this issue it is necessary to make a shallow bend and then slip the tubing about 1/4" in the bender and repeat. This results in about a 2" radius and a less than perfectly seamless arc. But it doesn't collapse the tube! Here are the new lines:


The new hard lines route cleanly down past the front side flange and under the bottom of the a/c mount bracket:


Top side they route cleanly between the thermostat water neck and valve cover to the fuel rail supply and return ports:


On the left hand side of the engine the lines are angled out and down towards the chassis mounted fuel lines:


I still need to add a couple of hard points to the a/c mount bracket to attach Adel clamps to secure the lines in place. Maybe I can get that done this weekend. Once the compressor mount modifications are complete I'll go back and replace the remaining screw hose clamps before installing the compressor mount bracket for good.
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Old 09-01-2020, 09:14 PM   #40
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Did a little more A/C work today. I fabricated / welded up the revised A/C compressor mount bracket for the later Sanden-style compressor using the old York-style bracket as a starting point. I'm using the OEM flange brackets from the '89 240 junk yard donor car. These brackets allow the compressor to be adjusted for drive-belt tension with a nice jack screw. For my 'new' compressor bracket I turned some round bar stock to capture the compressor mount bushings. Looking around the shop I found some 1.38" O.D. round bar stock laying around and it was just long enough to make the upper and lower mount tubes. But I messed up when parting the material into two pieces and cut one of them too short. I didn't have any more suitable material laying around so used my mistake cutoff piece as part of the upper mount. What's the old adage, "Measure twice and cut once?"

I purchased a set of 4 new polyurethane bushings from RockAuto for about $10 total. They will press into my new mounting 'tubes'. Then I cut a groove in a piece of 1/2" x 1" rectangular bar stock and welded the round 'tubes' to the newly grooved flat bar. The groove acts as a guide to keep the 'tubes' aligned as well as providing a nice large flat on the back side to weld to the old stock Volvo compressor mount. In order to position the compressor on the mount properly I clamped a couple of straight edges on 1, the crank pulley, and 2, the new idler pulley. I then installed the stock York bracket onto the engine block. With a helper I was able to hold the compressor in position while she scribed location lines on the bracket face so that I could weld everything together on the bench. After tack welding the 'tubes' in place on the bracket a quick fit check showed that the pulleys were properly aligned. I also welded a couple of tube nuts to the bracket to secure a pair of padded Adel clamps for the new fuel hard lines that I fab'd a few days ago.

The revised B20 compressor mount bracket:


While everything was installed for fit check I also measured for the new A/C drive belt.

Besides fitting the Sanden-stlye compressor I needed to fab a bracket to mount the receiver-drier. It will sit behind the right headlight and sandwich in but still leave room for the voltage regulator headlight adjusting screws, air cleaner canister and a/c hoses (hopefully). After examination of the space available I noticed that the3 nice engineers at Volvo had conveniently provided several mounting holes in the selected area. So I laid out the new bracket to make use of the existing Volvo factory holes in the right front fender inner panel.

The receiver-drier bracket:


I'll apply a coat of paint to the brackets and bake them tonight. I have to drive up to Lancaster tomorrow so that'll give them plenty of time to cure before installation. Possibly as soon as day after tomorrow. With any luck I'll be able to start laying out a/c hoses and wiring this weekend.
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Old 09-01-2020, 10:14 PM   #41
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Top notch work, love your progress. Its all about the details.
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Old 09-04-2020, 12:51 AM   #42
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I found the of the new polyurethane bushings from RockAuto for the A/C compressor in the mailbox when I came home from work this evening. So pressing (squeezing really) them into the mount bracket seemed like a good idea. I used a length of threaded rod and a couple of nuts to pull them into their respective sockets. I wiped a light coating of petroleum jelly on the inside of the sockets to make them slide in easier and also to provide a little bit of corrosion protection to the bracket longer term. I had painted the new brackets 2 days ago and baked them for about 90 minutes at 300F after my lovely wife was asleep. It's a good thing that it was cool enough the last couple of days to have all of the downstairs windows and doors open for ventilation!

Here's the finished compressor bracket:


I also put a captive slip-on nut plate on the painted receiver-drier bracket. It provides a blind nut for the single screw that secures the receiver-drier clamp. That's critical as it is in a tight spot under the air filter canister. It would not be fun to try to put a nut on the back side of that screw!

Here's the finished receiver-drier bracket:


And in-situ:


Installation of the finished receiver-drier bracket with my old unit looks like it may work out OK for routing the plumbing:


I plan to use a 90deg fitting pointed down and route hose to the existing hole near the bottom of the core support to connect up to the condenser output port. Hopefully I can use a 45deg fitting and run the receiver-drier outlet hose along the fender inner panel to the existing hole in the firewall and connect up to the expansion valve on the HVAC module under the dash.

Over on the engine I fitted up the new compressor mount and Adel clamped the fuel lines in place:


There is just enough room for the new hard lines to clear the lower edge of the compressor mount bracket and the upper edge of the timing gear cover / block.


By just enough room I mean that I can put my finger in between the fuel lines and the surrounding structures. Hopefully the clamps provide sufficient locating support so that the hard lines don't move around and rub on the vibrating engine hardware. I've added a fuel line sleeve around each of the tubes where they are closest to the block and mount bracket as a precaution.

Next up is fitting the compressor for final drive belt sizing.
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Old 09-04-2020, 09:26 AM   #43
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Looks clean and very well executed.

Did you catch that your vent hose from your filler cap has a deep cut in it ?
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Old 09-04-2020, 11:40 AM   #44
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Don't know how I missed this build thread... Love the 145! Very professional work. Keep it up!
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Old 09-04-2020, 10:55 PM   #45
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Quote:
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Looks clean and very well executed.

Did you catch that your vent hose from your filler cap has a deep cut in it ?
Thank you Matt. Yes I did and I have ordered up a replacement. I should have it tomorrow morning. I'm assuming that the Phillips head screws in the oil filler cap go into the breather h
ose to keep it in place. I guess I'll figure that out in the morning....


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Originally Posted by IansPlatinum View Post
Love the 145! Very professional work. Keep it up!
Thank you very much Ian.


Today was not very productive. I didn't make it into the shop at all. This morning on my way out I noticed some water at the corner of the garage door. There is a hose bib and hose reel right there so I figured that someone left the hose on over night. But no, that would be too easy, the hose was off. So I opened up the garage door to find water along the east wall back to the south corner where the water heater and sink are located. I crawled under the sink and discovered that the water heater was not leaking. Thank goodness!!! But the angle stop that connects the sink faucet to the wall hot water pipe was leaking a very steady drip. And when I touched it to turn off the water all hell broke loose. I felt like I was in Oklahoma in the 1900s and had just discovered oil. It was a gusher.

As I was turning off the water main to the house and garage my lovely bride came out and asked me if I was messing about with the power? You guessed it, the power went out. And a short while later we lost terrestrial phone service too. A great start to the day.

So after a trip to our local plumbing supply house I was able to source new 1/4 turn angle stops, flex hoses and a new faucet assembly for the sink (A little bit of scope creep there, did you catch that? the new faucet has a goose neck that will make filling up a 5 gallon pail in the sink much easier.). By around 1:00pm I had the plumbing remedied. Then after eating lunch it was going on 2:00 so I just bagged it for working today. By about 4:00 the power was back on. And around 7:00 we had phone and internet working again. It was only about 95F today so it was actually a pretty awesome day for this trifecta to have happened. Really. We're expecting 110F tomorrow and Sunday so it'll be nice to have the A/C working in the house.


After lunch, because I wasn't going in to work, and since the power was back on, I decided to hang the a/c compressor on the engine. It has turned out OK, but not as nice as I would like. The compressor is about 1/2" closer to the brake boost vacuum canister than I would like. There is room for the pressure and suction hoses to clear but it is tighter than I want it to be.

The compressor installed:


So I think that I will cut a new pair of adjuster brackets for the compressor that will allow it to rotate tight up against the mounting bracket, or as close as possible anyway. That will be a nice little project for next week. In the mean time this weekend, if it's not too hot outside to work comfortably, I can work on the electrical for the fan and compressor and plumbing routing for the a/c lines.
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Old 09-06-2020, 07:35 PM   #46
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I decided that I was not entirely happy with the compressor clearance to the power brake vacuum boost canister. So this morning I removed the compressor mount bracket to start working on new flange tabs that mate the compressor to the mount bracket. Upon removal of the compressor and mount bracket I found some witness marks on the new fuel hard lines. I put my finger under the mount bracket and could feel clearance all around the tubes. So maybe the witness marks are simply the result of fuel line contact during bracket installation. But I want to be sure. So some insurance (scope creep?) is in order in the form of a support bracket for the fuel lines to make sure that they can't move around and come into contact with the bracket, block or compressor which would lead to fuel line failure. This would most definitely not be a good thing!

Shiny scratches are visible on the left most fuel line. The extra bit of fuel hose on the upper line is there to act as an anti-chafe cushion between the two hard lines:


Looking at the side of the engine block showed a couple of existing drilled and 3/8" coarse thread tapped holes conveniently located for mounting a fuel line support bracket on the side of the timing gear case:


It's difficult to reach down in that area to get a good measurement for the hole spacing. Not to worry, I'll be designing this new bracket using my trusty old CAD system. That's Cardboard Aided Design for you non-technical types. So I got out my tool set:


In order to capture the hole pattern / spacing I applied a strip of tape to the side of the block and then pushed a couple of screws thru the tape to punch holes in the tape:


As you can see, the holes aren't very pretty making it difficult to get accurate dimensions from the tape:


Not to worry though, a couple of washers will stick right to the tape:


Followed by a quick fit check back on the side of the block. Now Press the tape down firmly on the washers to locate them securely.


Then remove the tape and washers from the block and return to the work bench. At the work bench lay another piece of tape over the opposite (sticky) side of the tape and the washers are now securely captured in the proper relationship to the holes in the side of the block.


Next take your trusty razor knife or other suitable implement of destruction and open up the holes using the washers as a guide. There you have an accurate hole pattern template:


The next step is to cut a bit of cardboard from the scrap cardboard box that I had laying about (remnant of the garage faucet replacement of a couple of days ago). Review of the shape of the cardboard scrap before rough cutting to shape revealed a conveniently placed fold in the cardboard. Holding the cardboard in place allows marking to start to get a feel for the shape of the new fuel line support bracket:


Back on the work bench the basic outlines of the bracket are marked with a pencil. I use a pencil for this as opposed to a magic marker as it is easier to erase when I screw it up!


Moving back to the block it's time to mark the locations of one of the hole centers and the bottom edge of the new bracket. This time with a Sharpie as it is easier to get a defined point with the pen in these relatively confined spaces than it is with a pencil:


Back on the work bench it is now time to use the tape template to layout and punch the mounting holes in the cardboard:


And then cut the cardboard into shape:


Then move back to the engine for fit check and marking. A couple of Adel clamps will be screwed to the new bracket to secure the fuel lines.:


Since the engine vibrates during operation the cantilevered tab on the bracket will likely act like a tuning fork at some point. So a bit of russeting is required to make sure that it doesn't fatigue over time. Back on the work bench the cardboard cut piece just removed is of convenient size and shape to form the gusset. A quick bit of taping on the back side makes the two pieces whole again:


And tape applied to the outside of the bracket makes it sufficiently strong to maintain position:


This added gusset piece is not yet in the proper shape for the new bracket bend configuration. Back on the engine it's time to mark the gusset for cardboard trim to final shape and return to the work bench for trim subsequently applying tape to both sides at the top of the pattern:


Another fit check shows that the tab at the top of the bracket is not quite long enough to fit screws for the Adel clamps:


Not to worry though as we have more cardboard and tape at our disposal. Here is the bracket taking shape with extra card stock added and holes punched for securing the Adel clamps:


One last fit check is in order:


And then cut the tape free as required to lay the cardboard pattern flat so that it can be traced out later onto a piece of sheet steel:


I think the new support bracket will do its job nicely and it was a good example of how to effectively utilize CAD techniques.

At this point I decided to call it a day for a couple of reasons:
1) My lovely bride said it was approaching noon and offered to make some lunch if I wanted to come inside.
And.
2) It was getting pretty warm out in the sun in the driveway:
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Old 09-11-2020, 02:12 PM   #47
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As I was turning off the water main to the house and garage my lovely bride came out and asked me if I was messing about with the power? You guessed it, the power went out. And a short while later we lost terrestrial phone service too. A great start to the day.

So after a trip to our local plumbing supply house I was able to source new 1/4 turn angle stops, flex hoses and a new faucet assembly for the sink (A little bit of scope creep there, did you catch that?
Of course. I was fully expecting to see all new copper piping and maybe even a new garage roof before the end of the weekend....

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Originally Posted by escondidoron View Post
The next step is to cut a bit of cardboard from the scrap cardboard box that I had laying about (remnant of the garage faucet replacement of a couple of days ago).
See? It wasn't overkill, just preparation.
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Old 09-11-2020, 02:15 PM   #48
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Now Press the tape down firmly on the washers to locate them securely.
Very effective use of tape. Thanks for sharing!
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Old 09-12-2020, 02:02 AM   #49
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I made the bracket today and tried my hand at summarizing the fabrication via video:


I've applied the paint and hope to install it this weekend.
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Old 09-13-2020, 09:25 PM   #50
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I got some time this afternoon to install the fuel line support bracket, the compressor mount and the compressor. I also made another set of fuel lines out of copper nickel brake line instead of steel. It is much easier to bend and will accept a tighter radius as well which made for improved clearance at the bottom of the compressor mount bracket.

Here's a pic of the new fuel line support and revised fuel lines all installed. I have used some extra fuel line to act as anti-chafe to ensure that the fuel lines don't rub together:


And with the compressor neatly tucked into its new home:


Note: I tightened up the adjuster screws after this pic was taken.

Now it's time to fab a set of hoses and then connect up the E-fan, compressor clutch and over-pressure safety switch. Oh yeah, I also have to size a drive belt for the compressor.
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