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Old 05-14-2020, 04:47 PM   #51
alschnertz
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Installed an excellent condition 'correct' cluster courtesy of Alschnertz. All I can say is wow!

It fixed my sticky speedo issues as well!

Thanks for the shout-out.
Looks like you lost 190,000 miles in the transition!
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Old 06-07-2020, 11:23 PM   #52
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Drove rusty a total of 70 miles in the last 2 days.

Car died 4 miles from home. Coasted into a neighborhood for diagnostics. Turns out it was out of gas (gas gauge was stuck at full)



Luckily was travelling with the fiancee so she was able to grab some gas with her car

Made it to the gas station, filled up, and went home! Reset the brake circuit trip sensor & had to manually close the heater valve to keep hot air from blowing, but it's a comfier ride now.

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Old 06-09-2020, 11:33 PM   #53
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Changed rear shocks



Man I need to learn how to weld...





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Old 06-10-2020, 12:30 AM   #54
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Get yourself this welder. It's all you will ever need. https://www.harborfreight.com/Titani...der-56355.html

Wait till you get a coupon. I got mine for $149 plus tax. Best purchase that I've ever made at Harbor Freight.
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Old 06-10-2020, 07:05 AM   #55
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Nice project. You probably know that the shock support is a common place for them to rust. Assume the wagon is easier to fix than the sedans with access at least. I have a 142 and looking at upgrading the suspension a bit, have you run the KYB gas-a-justs shocks, if so what do you think? Why did you chose them? Also considering the Excel Gs as a more mild upgrade but don’t know in real terms how much stiffer the a-justs are and how much they impact comfort?

Good luck with the project, cool car!
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Old 06-10-2020, 10:03 AM   #56
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Nice project. You probably know that the shock support is a common place for them to rust. Assume the wagon is easier to fix than the sedans with access at least. I have a 142 and looking at upgrading the suspension a bit, have you run the KYB gas-a-justs shocks, if so what do you think? Why did you chose them? Also considering the Excel Gs as a more mild upgrade but don’t know in real terms how much stiffer the a-justs are and how much they impact comfort?

Good luck with the project, cool car!
Considering the difference in price is $6, go for the Gas-a-justs. Either one will be miles better than the blown-out originals on the car. The GaJ are probably closer to the original Bilstein/Boge.
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Old 06-10-2020, 10:14 AM   #57
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Considering the difference in price is $6, go for the Gas-a-justs. Either one will be miles better than the blown-out originals on the car. The GaJ are probably closer to the original Bilstein/Boge.
Thanks.
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Old 06-10-2020, 10:36 AM   #58
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Nice progress!

As far as welding goes, Miller has some good instructional videos on YouTube. That will get you started, and a lot of practice will get you good enough to make the repair. When it comes to welding floors and stuff you don't need to be a pro by any means. You just need to spend a lot of time prepping the area and being patient so you don't warp the steel. There's no need to stack perfect dimes on a floor pan where nobody is going to see it. I'm glad your saving this thing! It's come a long way already.
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Old 06-10-2020, 10:44 AM   #59
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Originally Posted by IansPlatinum View Post
Man I need to learn how to weld...
"A grinder and paint will make you the welder you ain't."

The HF flux core will certainly do the job, especially considering the fact they set the polarity correctly for flux core (gas-shielded uses the opposite polarity). Spend another $12 on a HF air angle die grinder and some roll-lock pads and you'll be good to go!
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Old 06-10-2020, 11:37 AM   #60
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You probably know that the shock support is a common place for them to rust.
Yes, it's an awful design from a mechanical engineering point of view... it's practically begging for corrosion. I'm weighing doing just the shock reinforcement or replacing the whole inner wheel well, as I found a hole near the passenger rear seat belt anchor as well.

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Originally Posted by mitch1971 View Post
I have a 142 and looking at upgrading the suspension a bit, have you run the KYB gas-a-justs shocks, if so what do you think? Why did you chose them? Also considering the Excel Gs as a more mild upgrade but don’t know in real terms how much stiffer the a-justs are and how much they impact comfort?

Good luck with the project, cool car!
I took them out for a spin last night. The difference between the previous setup of 1 broken shock and 1 worn out vintage oil shock is night & day.

I chose them because... they're the only rear shock rockauto sells for the 140

They felt plenty stiff for my tastes, but I'm also trying to maintain the vintage 60s/70s station wagon driving characteristics of my car by avoiding things like stiffer springs, thicker sway bar, polyurethane, etc.

Now that I see it, I realize they are a performance shock. They were $25 so I just figured they'd get the job done. If I decide they're too harsh in the future, I'm only out $50

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Originally Posted by white855T View Post
Get yourself this welder. It's all you will ever need. https://www.harborfreight.com/Titani...der-56355.html

Wait till you get a coupon. I got mine for $149 plus tax. Best purchase that I've ever made at Harbor Freight.
I think I'll have to buy that & try it out... price is right, and I don't have to run a long cord to reach my 240V outlet...

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Originally Posted by volvowagoon View Post
Nice progress!

As far as welding goes, Miller has some good instructional videos on YouTube. That will get you started, and a lot of practice will get you good enough to make the repair. When it comes to welding floors and stuff you don't need to be a pro by any means. You just need to spend a lot of time prepping the area and being patient so you don't warp the steel. There's no need to stack perfect dimes on a floor pan where nobody is going to see it. I'm glad your saving this thing! It's come a long way already.
Appreciate it! Thanks for the tip on Miller.

Last edited by IansPlatinum; 06-10-2020 at 11:46 AM..
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Old 06-10-2020, 01:25 PM   #61
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Thanks.

Regarding the inner arch it is two pieces with a seam in the centre which was originally spot welded together. If the only rust to the inner section where the shock mount is is to the mounting plate area, just cut out and butt weld in a new reinforcing plate. Regarding the outer section of the inner arch, they rust at the front and rear areas as well and where they join to the outer arch. If the only rust area is the seat belt reinforcement pad then just repair that section. If the others areas are gone then cut out the outer inner arch, delete the middle joining flange and butt weld the inner and outer inner arches together from underneath.

You don't need a expensive mig for welding cars. A euro torch connection is good, I like 0.6mm wire and use 5% co2 argon mix gas. The shock reinforcement plate would be a nice repair to start with.

All the best. We have plenty of rusty cars over here as well. :-)
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Old 06-10-2020, 02:01 PM   #62
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Going in...

Just realized I installed these wrong... They're supposed to be 90 degrees rotated from the way I installed them.

I think they'll hold up ok though, considering the void is much smaller on these VP "reinforced" bushings as compared to the originals.

I had thought the void was there to allow articulation, but I guess its just a NVH feature.
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Old 06-10-2020, 02:15 PM   #63
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It's common practice to install these bushings with the voids rotated 90° to reduce axle twist under hard acceleration/braking. The Competition Service version of these bushings has no voids.

You probably already know that VP has the repair piece for the shock reinforcement.

http://212.247.61.152/US/main.aspx?p...e&artno=615080
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Old 06-10-2020, 03:17 PM   #64
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It's common practice to install these bushings with the voids rotated 90° to reduce axle twist under hard acceleration/braking.
Seems like that should have been the norm!

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You probably already know that VP has the repair piece for the shock reinforcement.

http://212.247.61.152/US/main.aspx?p...e&artno=615080
Yep, currently weighing them vs doing the whole inner well. I'm gonna thoroughly scrape down the area and ensure the repair panel would cover the entirety of the rust, and make the decision to go with whole inner wheel well vs repair patch depending on what I uncover.
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Old 06-10-2020, 04:24 PM   #65
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AFAIK only the outer wheel well is available.
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Old 06-10-2020, 04:25 PM   #66
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Originally Posted by vwbusman66 View Post
"A grinder and paint will make you the welder you ain't."

The HF flux core will certainly do the job, especially considering the fact they set the polarity correctly for flux core (gas-shielded uses the opposite polarity). Spend another $12 on a HF air angle die grinder and some roll-lock pads and you'll be good to go!
be careful with HF "MIG" and flux core welders. A lot of them arent DC, just a straight AC transformer to knock the voltage down. If you find that your "welds" look like a slug sitting on the top of the piece, get a 200v rectifier and wire it into the torch. This also gives you the ability to change polarity and if youre tricky with it, you can get it to fire off a gas solenoid and run a true MIG.
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Old 06-10-2020, 09:09 PM   #67
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be careful with HF "MIG" and flux core welders. A lot of them arent DC, just a straight AC transformer to knock the voltage down. If you find that your "welds" look like a slug sitting on the top of the piece, get a 200v rectifier and wire it into the torch. This also gives you the ability to change polarity and if youre tricky with it, you can get it to fire off a gas solenoid and run a true MIG.
Harbor freight has stepped up their game. The welder that I recommended is a dc inverter welder. You get super clean beads. Its also 120v. No need to buy a mig rig.
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Old 06-10-2020, 09:12 PM   #68
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I think I'll have to buy that & try it out... price is right, and I don't have to run a long cord to reach my 240V outlet...
Its 120v. Ideally it would be good if you had a 20 amp outlet to get full use of it. The welder can do up to 1/4 inch steel. For what you'll be doing, you don't actually need it to run at maximum power, so a 15 amp outlet will do.
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Old 06-10-2020, 10:14 PM   #69
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Harbor freight has stepped up their game. The welder that I recommended is a dc inverter welder. You get super clean beads. Its also 120v. No need to buy a mig rig.
Exactly.
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Old 06-10-2020, 10:24 PM   #70
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Y'all are nuts. Hobart Handler is the way to go. Give me that sweet sweet shielding gas. I love mine and have built so much cool stuff with it.

Get a you at least 2 4.5 grinders, one for a flapper and one for a cutoff wheel and you can build anything! I'd get a wire brush too.
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Old 06-10-2020, 10:30 PM   #71
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Y'all are nuts. Hobart Handler is the way to go. Give me that sweet sweet shielding gas. I love mine and have built so much cool stuff with it.

Get a you at least 2 4.5 grinders, one for a flapper and one for a cutoff wheel and you can build anything! I'd get a wire brush too.
Oh I won't argue that gas shielded is king, but I can tell you that HF welder linked above is really really good for the money, especially for occasional rust repair (easy light gauge metal) and stuff you're covering with undercoating and paint.

That review video speaks for itself really.
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Old 06-10-2020, 10:55 PM   #72
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Yeah I can see it having a place, especially combined with a generator. Or in the wind. Probably good for fixing Gates etc. There's been occasions where it is a pain to travel with the full setup. And I'd concede it would probably be fine for the job.
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Old 06-11-2020, 01:51 AM   #73
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Flux mig wire is not good for car repairs, get gas and use 5% CO2 and 95% argon mix. It is night and day, don’t make life hard for yourself.
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Old 06-11-2020, 10:25 AM   #74
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Harbor freight has stepped up their game. The welder that I recommended is a dc inverter welder. You get super clean beads. Its also 120v. No need to buy a mig rig.
Cool. Inverter is the way to go. Nice light package, and a lotta amps for the $.
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Old 06-11-2020, 11:07 AM   #75
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Flux mig wire is not good for car repairs, get gas and use 5% CO2 and 95% argon mix. It is night and day, don’t make life hard for yourself.
Unless you have home shop, no one has room for gas tanks and most are not going to fork out money to do that. The very idea that not using gas will make life harder is ridiculous. Keep drinking the koolaid man. We'll be getting s*** done.
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