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Old 06-11-2020, 11:20 AM   #76
vwbusman66
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Originally Posted by mitch1971 View Post
Flux mig wire is not good for car repairs, get gas and use 5% CO2 and 95% argon mix. It is night and day, don’t make life hard for yourself.
Having spent a fair amount of time doing professional bodywork and frame building, you can get pretty good results from a flux welder. Then, once you grind down whatever you don't want, you can't tell the difference. Usually, flux core will actually be less sensitive to surface prep.

If you're ready to shell out $1k+ on a welder, sure, get a shielded mig welder.
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Old 06-11-2020, 11:23 AM   #77
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Unless you have home shop, no one has room for gas tanks and most are not going to fork out money to do that. The very idea that not using gas will make life harder is ridiculous. Keep drinking the koolaid man. We'll be getting s*** done.
No one has room for gas tanks? How big are these gas tanks? 😅
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Old 06-11-2020, 11:40 AM   #78
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Originally Posted by vwbusman66 View Post
Having spent a fair amount of time doing professional bodywork and frame building, you can get pretty good results from a flux welder. Then, once you grind down whatever you don't want, you can't tell the difference. Usually, flux core will actually be less sensitive to surface prep.

If you're ready to shell out $1k+ on a welder, sure, get a shielded mig welder.
Buy once, cry once.
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Old 06-11-2020, 11:40 AM   #79
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Originally Posted by vwbusman66 View Post
Having spent a fair amount of time doing professional bodywork and frame building, you can get pretty good results from a flux welder. Then, once you grind down whatever you don't want, you can't tell the difference. Usually, flux core will actually be less sensitive to surface prep.

If you're ready to shell out $1k+ on a welder, sure, get a shielded mig welder.
Do you use a flux core welder to do professional bodywork? I have never seen or even heard of anyone before not using gas professionally. You can do it but I’ve only ever seen the terrible results from a newbie to welding trying to use a gas less mig on car panels. Gas mig is as easy as it gets, if you can’t afford it or don’t want to spend the money fair enough but gas is night and day easier, especially for a beginner welder.
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Old 06-11-2020, 11:42 AM   #80
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AFAIK only the outer wheel well is available.
This is the panel I was referring to



http://212.247.61.152/us/main.aspx?p...&artno=1255394
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Old 06-11-2020, 11:58 AM   #81
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Pros use TIG or gas shielded MIG. We use both a Miller (230 V) and the Hobart shown above as well as TIG on exterior panels. The wheel wells could easily be done with the little Hobart.

Ian, $133 with VP ? That's worth it just in time saved trying to shape metal.
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Old 06-11-2020, 12:25 PM   #82
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Most of us are not doing professional restoration. Everyone I've seen doing 'professional work' was using a mig setup. I've seen one person doing tig. Though we're not doing pro restos, it doesn't mean we are purposely doing s***work.
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Old 06-11-2020, 12:28 PM   #83
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This is the panel I was referring to

That's the correct part if they have it. I don't know how I missed it. GCP says it's discontinued.

The other side is still available from Volvo but it costs more.

http://212.247.61.152/US/main.aspx?p...&artno=1255395
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Old 06-11-2020, 12:44 PM   #84
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This is the panel I was referring to

Oh yeah, I forgot this thread was about a 145!
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Old 06-11-2020, 01:12 PM   #85
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Oh yeah, I forgot this thread was about a 145!


It is about a 145, but it's also about learning!

I'm thinking the HF welder will get me through the wheel well repairs and the floor pan that i need to do. Depending on how it goes, I might make the jump to a gas rig for exterior facing body panels, or have someone else do the exterior facing welding.

I'm not opposed to purchasing items/tools that can be resold.
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Old 06-12-2020, 08:24 PM   #86
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Bought a fitting license plate for my antique tags:



Perhaps "da greatest year" 145?
"Ded gummit y'all" 145

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Old 06-12-2020, 10:59 PM   #87
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It is about a 145, but it's also about learning!

have someone else do the exterior facing welding.
Sounds like an excellent plan. You don't have to do everything yourself. Guys who does this type of work day in and day out will do it faster and better.
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Old 06-12-2020, 11:01 PM   #88
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[/IMG]

Perhaps "da greatest year" 145?
"Ded gummit y'all" 145
Damn good yeehaw 145
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Old 06-14-2020, 12:55 PM   #89
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Devils Grave Yard 145 related to the dusty clay grave it was so closely saved from.
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Old 06-15-2020, 12:22 PM   #90
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Bought a fitting license plate for my antique tags:



Perhaps "da greatest year" 145?
"Ded gummit y'all" 145
Old Prospector Edition
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Old 06-26-2020, 12:51 PM   #91
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Old 06-26-2020, 01:18 PM   #92
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Dreams really do come true!
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Old 06-26-2020, 01:46 PM   #93
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Day-um, that's nizzze
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Old 06-26-2020, 05:40 PM   #94
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The question now is to paint it with SEM paint or not
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Old 06-26-2020, 10:47 PM   #95
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If you don't, and assuming it's the usual dash pad material that Volvo used on the Amazons, 1800S' and 240's: hit it with 2-3 thick coats of Meguiar's Rubber and vinyl cleaner and protectant. P/N: M5716SP

It's how I've salvaged 2 P1800 dashes, it really works well. It's just shiny and annoying for a few days while it soaks in.
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Old 06-27-2020, 12:29 AM   #96
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It's identical to the dash material used on my 240 late style dash.

I'm going to clean it up with some griot's vinyl interior cleaner and see how it looks.

I'm for sure painting my center console so I'll see how that turns out and base my decision off of that.
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Old 06-30-2020, 12:48 PM   #97
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Also bought a new kick panel to replace my broken one...
The AC kick panel is apparently just a stock kick panel with a rectangle cut in it



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Old 06-30-2020, 03:46 PM   #98
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Also bought a new kick panel to replace my broken one...
The AC kick panel is apparently just a stock kick panel with a rectangle cut in it



If your existing panels do not have major missing pieces, you can do effective repairs by solvent welding the parts back together. I use acetone for this which is slightly more aggressive than a lot of solvent cements. Because it evaporates fairly quickly (especially when air temperatures are high) you need to repeatedly paint the part with the acetone to get it tacky prior to joining.

Volvo never marked the parts with the material type; but, I expect it is likely ABS (which has been in commercial use since the mid '50s). You can buy sheets of 1/8" ABS from lots of vendors and you can cut the ABS into thin strips to back the cracked areas for extra strength. Same trick, repeatedly apply acetone to the piece being repaired and the backing strip, particularly the backing strip so that it gets quite soft and conforms to the curve of the valence and then clamp until set.

If you need to fill small gaps, grind up some ABS and dissolve it in acetone to make an ABS slurry / paste which can be worked into the gaps. Getting a matching finish can be iffy; but if its not in direct line of site and you carefully sand flat it won't be noticeable, especially if you paint with your preferred plastic refinishing product.

I fixed cracks in my glove box (had to re flock the interior to hide the re enforcing strips) and my lower valence using this approach.
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Old 06-30-2020, 04:12 PM   #99
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I was going to go with that approach, as I'm doing the same to repair some small cracks on my center console armrest piece, but this center valence panel popped up on ebay for $80 shipped. i figured that was fair enough that I could buy it and just cut it to accommodate the AC vents. and it'll look way better.

I was planning on using thin sheet aluminum and 2 part epoxy though, but to the same effect.


Plus it has the extended bottom that looks better than the weird ass floor vent thing that volvo put there.
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Old 06-30-2020, 08:29 PM   #100
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I was planning on using thin sheet aluminum and 2 part epoxy though, but to the same effect.
I tried that approach on another project. Even when I put a heavy tooth on the plastic part the epoxy bond eventually ended up failing. It might have been due to the fact that unreenforced ABS has a thermal expansion coefficient about 3 - 3.5 times that of aluminum and the differential expansion in the pieces during ambient temperature cycling caused the bond failure. Epoxy might have worked if I had used ABS as the backing material.

If I had been able to get an intact replacement piece for $80 all in I probably would have picked that option.
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