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Old 08-12-2018, 01:12 AM   #51
LC4CARL
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A serious white-knuckler.
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Old 08-12-2018, 11:45 AM   #52
Duder
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Cool project man, I remember seeing this car for sale by the PO. Looked like a great deal. Impressive progress so far on the swap.

To test the ignition switch you could measure resistance in ohms across the terminals with the switch in its various positions. Reference a wiring diagram to see which terminals should be connected in each switch position. It sounds like a tin of current went through the switch and it became the fuse in the system.
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Old 08-14-2018, 09:47 PM   #53
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A serious white-knuckler.
Thanks, I hope it's more of a riot to drive than my Turbo Miata.

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Cool project man, I remember seeing this car for sale by the PO. Looked like a great deal. Impressive progress so far on the swap.

To test the ignition switch you could measure resistance in ohms across the terminals with the switch in its various positions. Reference a wiring diagram to see which terminals should be connected in each switch position. It sounds like a tin of current went through the switch and it became the fuse in the system.
I tested the switch resistance and did a continuity test, i'm pretty sure he's dead, Jim.

I did order a new ignition switch from IPD, and picked up a parts wagon I could steal one from, but I won't be around for awhile to install it. Unfortunately for the car, it's time for me to pack up and go off to college. I'll be a freshman at the University of Iowa majoring in computer science. If you happen to be on turbobricks and go to Iowa, send me a pm.

Here's the last few things I got done before going off. I welded the remaining holes in the engine bay for the OEM washer bottle and coolant overflow. The hole with the rubber plug is what I will use to fill the washer bottle, so it wasn't welded shut. For the coolant overflow, i'm planning on getting a generic aluminum cylinder style bottle. It'll look "cooler" and that way I won't have to engineer up/cap off the return hose of the OEM expansion style tank.



I finished the wiring for the starter motor by drilling a hole large enough for the ignition switch starter solenoid wire and the large 2 gauge wire coming from the battery. I covered both wires with some high heat flexible braided sleeving. The wires are routed around the exhaust manifold, and yes I will add a clamp to secure the wires.



Lastly, about 2 weeks ago or so my Dad and I picked this ugly piece of work up.



It's a 92 automatic wagon with some nice parts on it. First, it had a cloth interior that has already been swapped between our 240 wagons (vinyl is gross). It even came with the added cushions for the seat headrests. Second, it will be a nice donor for rust repair on our OG 240 wagon, as the driver's side on this car is gone, but the the opposite is true of our OG wagon. Third, even though it is a 92, it has the later 93 style A/C, which will also be swapped into the OG wagon. Fourth, this has the later style no trim windshield which will also be swapped over. Lastly, it has BC Racing coilovers, Kaplhenke strut bar with brake master brace, Kaplhenke panhard bar, and a front splitter for the 242.

This is going to be the last update for a while, but while i'm at college, my dad should be working on the painting/powdercoating of the 242, and swapping stuff on the 240 wagons.
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Old 08-15-2018, 08:22 AM   #54
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I actually really love that colour combo. Looks rad!
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Old 08-23-2018, 10:42 AM   #55
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This was a good read, answered a lot of the questions I had about mating a CD009 to an Ellis. Nice work.
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easiest way to run 11's is to build a 9 second car and turn it down a little.
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Old 08-23-2018, 07:19 PM   #56
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This was a good read, answered a lot of the questions I had about mating a CD009 to an Ellis. Nice work.
Thanks, I really like to give other people help and ideas by showing pretty much everything I do on a build.

In other news, a bunch of parts have gone off to powdercoat, and my Dad is working on finishing the engine bay for paint. I'm trying to convince him to repaint the whole car Porsche Kiln Red... but we'll see. As mentioned before, i'm away from home right at college, but thanksgiving break will definitely show some progress.
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Old 08-24-2018, 07:35 AM   #57
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I love this build. I've wanted a 2 doors for a while but took the cheapest 240 I could find locally instead haha. Looks like you're doing a good job for sure!
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Old 05-12-2019, 09:05 PM   #58
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Almost a year later, and through my first year of college, I'm ready to get back to it. Over the few breaks I had during the school year I did some small stuff like filling some more holes in the engine bay along with some more primer, but nothing major. Here's a pic I took before it went into the garage over the winter.



Another update during the break was getting a lot of miscellaneous part powder coated.



Lastly, I just took the coilovers off my parts wagon this weekend, and took a picture giving a sneak peak of the stuff that's to come for the build, still waiting on shipping for a few important bits...

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Old 05-22-2019, 06:27 PM   #59
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After waiting through a few backorders, I was able to finally get my Holley Terminator X. When I saw the X was announced, it didn't take much convincing for me to buy it. Previously, I went through my factory harness and cut out all of the unnecessary stuff, and even purchased new pigtails for my LS1 style injectors, but then having to get a mail order reflash, and having to trailer the car somewhere for a tune is a huge pain, and expensive. At some point down the road, I would like to add forced induction, but then another retune is a huge pain, and from my Turbo Miata project, when the weather changes here in Iowa, the car will go lean/rich. Basically, a standalone with completely new wiring, and the ability to control with my laptop, or the included handheld makes a lot of headaches go away.

Onto the technical stuff for those interested, I ordered the Terminator X for a 24x crank (Gen 3 engine) and LS1 injectors. Since I have a manual transmission and drive by cable, I do not need the Max version. Along with the ECU, I picked up a couple of 100 PSI pressure transducers off Amazon (fuel and oil), an adapter fitting for the oil pressure and a Holley alternator pigtail (not wired on engine harness). As shown in the previous post, I also picked up a Holley 7" Digital Dash along with the GPS speedometer add on, and the I/O adapter. Quick note on the I/O adapter, Holley charges ~$190 for the cable I purchased along a DIY wiring harness or ~$90 for just the cable that connects to the inside of the dash. Unfortunately, I couldn't find the little connector that goes inside the dash, but the larger connector is a standard Delphi/TE 1473416-2 connector you can buy from Mouser for $7 if only want to connect a few wires. With the I/O connector, I can connect the Volvo fuel level gauge to the digital dash along with turn signal indicators and other status LEDs (Alt, High Beam, etc). Furthermore, the dash runs Holley's PC software and is like having a dedicated laptop in the car that can do everything, and eliminates the need to adapt Volvo gauges, easily solves the speedometer/odometer swap issue or the need to purchase a matching suite of aftermarket gauges.

On to some pictures...



The Terminator X is pretty small, and is just about the exact same size as the dash. I previously had concerns over whether the GM gen 3 ecu would fit in the factory location due to its large size, but not anymore.



In less exciting news I disassembled the crusty spindles the BCs are welded to and will get them power coated/painted up before going on the car. I also took the liberty of pushing the engine further back towards the firewall, which will give me better options for mounting a forward plate mount shifter like JohnMC used. Also decided to change to a 2010 LS3 Camaro water pump and tensioner for easier upper radiator hose routing.

Lastly, if anyone from Holley reads this, feel free to send me some engine dress-up swag.
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Old 06-05-2019, 07:54 PM   #60
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The Terminator X is mounted and the car is closer to a test run. For anyone who ends up purchasing a Terminator X, I found that the factory fresh air block off plate on the passenger side is the perfect size to mount the ecu with some #10 self tapping screws.



If you mount the ecu with the connectors towards the firewall, you can easily see the diagnostic LEDs and have space to wrap the long engine harness around. Furthermore, the harness fuse and key-on relay are mounted on a self tapped screw in the stamped valley below the ecu. In the top corner, you can see 2 connectors on the Holley harness, one is for the input/outputs and the other is a power tap with 12v, 5v and signal grounds for additional sensors. With the Terminator X, there are only 5 loose wires, but i'm not using the blue tachometer output wire.



The main power harness for the ecu is on its own connector and separate fuse. It's routed alongside the main battery power wire through the car and into the trunk.





The engine side of the harness is ready to go and does not require anything other than plugging in the connectors and attaching the 2 grounds to the cylinder heads. One thing to note is the factory truck oil pressure sensor doesn't work with the Holley system (might be "dummy" sensor anyway) so you will need an adapter for a 1/8 npt 100 psi pressure transducer along with a VERY deep welled 1-1/16" socket to remove the factory sensor if the engine is in the car.



Next is a couple of side notes, starting with my throttle cable. I used the Lokar 36" LS1 throttle cable with their single cable bracket (non-cruise). For my engine position, I cut 2" off the cable and braided sheath to get a clean routing and made a new aluminum firewall mount.





Last but not least, I made an alternator sub-harness, containing 3 wires. The charging wire is 6 AWG and runs along the front of the engine to the starter solenoid where it joins the rest of the electrical system. The other 2 wires are on the 4 pin plug to control the alternator. I used the previously shown Holley pigtail which is wired for the charging light, but I added a wire at pin "D" that is used for remote voltage sensing. This wire connects to the main power distribution bus bar. It ensures that when all accessories are drawing a load, the alternator will be able to keep a steady voltage throughout the car. Lastly, since this harness is secured to the engine, a 2 pin weatherpack connector is located near the starter connection, allowing easier removal.

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Old 06-10-2019, 06:11 PM   #61
dbarton
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Here's the heart of the modern AC, a Vintage Air Gen 2 Compac



I followed Dave Barton's install of a Classic Auto Air as this unit is almost the exact same size. My Dad fabbed up some steel brackets with new rivnuts on the trans tunnel and reused one of the factory hang mounts. As you can see, the unit will stick out into the passenger foot well a couple inches, but it'll look clean.





I left plenty of room for the condensation drain and ran some of the supplied hose into part of the factory drain hose.



The glovebox clearance is pretty good, just needs a small trim on the corner of the fan cover.


I'm particularly interested in seeing more detail on the Vintage Air installation. Since I went with their competitor, Classic Auto Air, I'm familiar with that, but I'd like to see how the Vintage Air stuff fits and performs in comparison. I know some of the differences just from reading their page, but that's about it.

I think yours has slightly larger duct outlets.
My installation: https://www.240turbo.com/classicair.html
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Old 06-11-2019, 12:01 AM   #62
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I'm particularly interested in seeing more detail on the Vintage Air installation. Since I went with their competitor, Classic Auto Air, I'm familiar with that, but I'd like to see how the Vintage Air stuff fits and performs in comparison. I know some of the differences just from reading their page, but that's about it.

I think yours has slightly larger duct outlets.
My installation: https://www.240turbo.com/classicair.html
Dave B
For extra detail, I'll make sure to document my wiring into the Holley and the routing of the hoses and ducting when I finally get to them.

However I'm quite interested in performance too as I couldn't find many differences between the two. The main difference I was able to find were the control panels and some of the Classic Auto Air units have an extra tube/pass in the evaporator. I don't know how much surface area/great of an affect the extra tube has, but when the car finally runs I'll do some vent temperature testing to compare our results.
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