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Old 11-16-2018, 09:08 PM   #51
snailmale
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Does the accumulator play any role in how a B21FT idles? I know for a fact this is toast because it leaks when the car runs and it would certainly explain why the fuel splatters on the right rear corner. The filler neck gasket looks tight and I doubt it's a bad cap.

Last edited by snailmale; 11-16-2018 at 09:24 PM..
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Old 11-19-2018, 12:03 AM   #52
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All my volvo cars have been LH jetronic bosch ignitions, so I have no input there. I received the IPD upgraded in tank pump yesterday, I just need to install it to see if the hornets go away ;)
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Old 11-19-2018, 12:23 PM   #53
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Don't forget to buy a pipe cutter/hack saw and a deburring tool! Harbor Freight's $3.99 pipe cutter is perfect for the job.
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Old 11-20-2018, 01:26 AM   #54
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Does the accumulator play any role in how a B21FT idles? I know for a fact this is toast because it leaks when the car runs and it would certainly explain why the fuel splatters on the right rear corner. The filler neck gasket looks tight and I doubt it's a bad cap.
Yes, as they decay insdie the dampening action isn't as good and fuel pump pulses can actually affect the air flow sensor flap on really bad ones. They also leak inside untl it starts coming out of the screw on opposite end from the fuel fittings. Speaking of the B21FT version. A bad accumulator affects hot starting in the mid warm engine zone where the car has been sitting for say 20-30 minutes after being driven hot weather. The fuel pump check valve plays a part in that situation as well.
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Old 11-20-2018, 03:14 AM   #55
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You don't seem to have a lot of experience with fixing cars, but you have a sane approach and I feel you're going to fix this thing just fine.

Just a side note: That arc welder you bought on the past page...If you plan on fixing that rust spot with it - it's not likely to work. Arc's are great for metal plates, but they're going to burn through sheetmetal and just leave your hole bigger and you frustrated. You need a MIG for that sort of thing.
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Old 11-20-2018, 03:27 PM   #56
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Got sick & tired of trying to save the jack and decided to return it. As I was getting into the car, I spotted a deal for the low-profile version of the 3-ton jack for only a few bucks more. Let's hope my luck holds out.
I've had this low profile version for years. Works fine.
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Old 11-20-2018, 08:37 PM   #57
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You don't seem to have a lot of experience with fixing cars, but you have a sane approach and I feel you're going to fix this thing just fine.

Just a side note: That arc welder you bought on the past page...If you plan on fixing that rust spot with it - it's not likely to work. Arc's are great for metal plates, but they're going to burn through sheetmetal and just leave your hole bigger and you frustrated. You need a MIG for that sort of thing.
The welder he purchased IS a wire feed welder, it literally shows the gun and spool of wire on the box. I'm sure it has the "MIG" option if it comes with a regulator and he were to purchase a CO2 tank. The CO2 as shielding gas and solid core wire will give you a much better weld than the flux core wire alone, but he can always grind it to look pretty. ;)
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Old 11-26-2018, 06:07 PM   #58
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Ordered a few more parts over the weekend.

* Fuel Accumulator: This part mysteriously went up in price on Black Friday. Hmm... Still cheaper on FCP Euro than everywhere else though. I understand the p/n ending in 034 is the "correct" OEM part and I figured I'll go with it.

* Brake Pedal cover: Less of a need, more of a want as 266k thousand miles in LA has left it looking pretty disgusting and it was on clearance. I've spent 95 cents on worse things.

* Valve cover gasket & rear cam seal: Here's to hoping I can slow or eliminate the Volvo's commitment to return fossil fuels back into the ground.

I won't get too far on the interior until I can at least get the car past smog. Currently researching materials to redo the door cards and so far it looks like 3/16" thick fiberboard is the winner. I'll need to do the left door cards and the right rear cargo panel at the minimum.
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Old 11-26-2018, 10:34 PM   #59
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The rear cam seal is pretty straightforward, just keep it flush with the back of the head and the #4 cam cap as you snug the bolts on the cam cap. Remember to put a dab of RTV on each side of the #1 and #4 cam cap to help seal the gasket where it bends sharply in those corners.

You might want to get the front cam seal too unless you are positive it isn't leaking. It's $4. However, pulling the front cam seal means pulling the timing gear. This can open another can of worms of you aren't really careful about not letting the auxiliary shaft or crankshaft move. If you are going that deep might as well do the timing belt too which means yanking the fan shroud, fan blade, and the auxiliary belts going to power steering and alternator. Weigh the options, the rear seal is just a valve cover gasket and popping cam cap 4. The front seal you may as well knock out all the wear parts while you're in there. Water pump too if you have any question about it. It's a lot more parts and labor, but will give you a solid foundation you can count on in the future.

I just did the cam seals on my brothers 244 this last weekend because the front cam seal was leaking. It turns out the front cam seal on his car wore a groove in the cam, so when I replaced it with a new one it still leaked because at the seal point the cam OD wasn't to spec with the ring seal ID. :( Fortunately, someone mentioned to me you don't have to seat the front cam seal all the way, and you can translate it a mm or 2 forward so it isn't riding in the groove, but honestly I'd just get a new cam at that point.

Just my $0.02
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Old 11-27-2018, 03:22 AM   #60
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It turns out the front cam seal on his car wore a groove in the cam, so when I replaced it with a new one it still leaked because at the seal point the cam OD wasn't to spec with the ring seal ID. :( Fortunately, someone mentioned to me you don't have to seat the front cam seal all the way, and you can translate it a mm or 2 forward so it isn't riding in the groove, but honestly I'd just get a new cam at that point.

Just my $0.02
It's been a while since I've been in that area, but I'm fairly certain the Greenbook specifies the change in the groove location as common practice. Could be wrong.
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Old 11-27-2018, 01:50 PM   #61
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The rear cam seal is pretty straightforward, just keep it flush with the back of the head and the #4 cam cap as you snug the bolts on the cam cap.
B21/B23 don't use a rear cam seal. The valve cover is flat in the back and they use a half moon shaped plug.



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I just did the cam seals on my brothers 244 this last weekend because the front cam seal was leaking. It turns out the front cam seal on his car wore a groove in the cam, so when I replaced it with a new one it still leaked because at the seal point the cam OD wasn't to spec with the ring seal ID. :( Fortunately, someone mentioned to me you don't have to seat the front cam seal all the way, and you can translate it a mm or 2 forward so it isn't riding in the groove, but honestly I'd just get a new cam at that point.

Just my $0.02
Why change the cam when you can get a repair sleeve for under $20.

https://www.summitracing.com/parts/tmk-kwk99139
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Old 11-29-2018, 10:47 PM   #62
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B21/B23 don't use a rear cam seal. The valve cover is flat in the back and they use a half moon shaped plug.
My bad, I keep forgetting the age of OP's car! I should have known that....

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Why change the cam when you can get a repair sleeve for under $20.
How does that sleeve fix a groove worn on the cam at the location of the front cam seal?
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Old 11-29-2018, 10:59 PM   #63
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It slips over the damaged surface and provides a new surface for the seal to ride on. Repair sleeves are available for virtually every seal surface.

Here's a better pic of the repair sleeve and installation tool.


Last edited by hiperfauto; 11-29-2018 at 11:09 PM..
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Old 11-30-2018, 11:24 PM   #64
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Ok, that makes sense now. I only saw the install tool on your other link, and sorry OP didn't mean to jack the thread.
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Old 12-05-2018, 05:33 AM   #65
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Hey, don't worry about it! It's a good learning experience for me too plus my fuel accumulator won't get here for another day.

Debating if I should go with the chrome-strip belt line trim as in the later cars, plastidip it black, or just make my own trim from Home Depot material.
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Old 12-16-2018, 08:08 PM   #66
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Just wondering, how are these plugs supposed to come apart? Does the piece in the red box come out of the yellow & black boot?



The insulation is looking pretty gross so I might just splice in some extra wire and add some crimp sleeves. I also gashed my thumb open, which wasn't very fun...
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Old 12-16-2018, 09:31 PM   #67
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Great news! I managed to wedge the plugs out (yup was the ones in the red box) with varying success. The + connector came out without a fight, but the - connector separated so I had to wedge some needle nose pliers in and break the connection. It's still serviceable, but I might come up with a replacement.

Or I'll just wait until the main pump kicks the bucket and fabricate something proper. Remember that I still need to get it smogged, so I'm aiming to get the car running well first, then think about the future.

The tray has been removed and the accumulator replaced. For those keeping score at home, here's what it takes to get it out of the tray:

1x 10mm (removes the hex-head clamp screw)
1x 3/4 wrench (fits on the banjo-bolt fitting)
1x 17mm wrench (fits on the fixed hex fitting on the accumulator inlet)

Also, 1x 12mm & 1x 14mm to break off the fitting at the plastic fuel line from the outlet.




My neighbors aren't the sort to fuss over things like "property values" (another neighbor has a dune buggy) so nobody seems to mind the ratty 245 sitting with its rear end off the ground!
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Old 12-16-2018, 09:54 PM   #68
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Here's what you need to fix your problem.
1 part # 3523813 repair wire and 1 part # 1307035 insulator (#1 in the pic). I should have both in stock.



[/QUOTE]

Either that or buy the NOS harness I have.

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Old 12-19-2018, 09:43 PM   #69
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It looks like the connector and even the wire is salvageable, it just popped loose. Still, I want to add some shrink wrap to help me (or the next owner) figure out which cable's which and maybe add another inch-or-so of wire.

What wire gauge is recommended?
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Old 01-04-2019, 10:16 PM   #70
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How's it going? Use wire the same gauge or larger.
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Old 01-06-2019, 08:56 PM   #71
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How's it going? Use wire the same gauge or larger.
It's been well, I stepped away to go on vacation for a bit. I ended up ordering the Volvo wire since I didn't need much of it.

Is there a trick to getting the fuel pump harness out? I noticed in the picture from Hiperfauto that it's a one piece gasket. Since this is so old, it's decaying (surprise! ) and I wonder if I can just snake it out through the top.

see next post for resolution

A part of me is tempted to just put whole assembly back and just butt splice the harness in place once the connections are plugged & wrap with tape.

Last edited by snailmale; 01-06-2019 at 09:16 PM..
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Old 01-06-2019, 09:27 PM   #72
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Great success! I was able to pinch the gasket such that I could remove it. Pinch & slip out through the hole.





After trying to force the connector through the hole, I tried a different tactic: why not feed it the other way through? It worked! The harness, as far as I can tell should be removed from the bottom - you feed the ring terminal & harness connector down through the hole instead of forcing the bullet connectors up through.

I'm going to splice in some new wire - join wires, solder, and shrink using the appropriate color. Been a couple years since I last picked up a soldering iron so gonna tackle a simple job to test out my skills & the new heat gun I bought ($8.99 final clearance @ Harbor Freight).
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Old 01-21-2019, 07:41 PM   #73
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Now that the wiring connector was rebuilt with some...serviceable soldering, I turned my attention to putting it back. All the lines came back together except for the line from the accumulator to the main. Now that was a good 1/4" short. Now, I know that this is the right part: confirmed it on multiple sites and I even have the old one in my shed somewhere.

Took a look at the pump and noticed there was an inch or so space in either direction not caked in (as much) dirt, suggesting that it wiggled around enough to avoid getting dirty. Sure enough, the Phillips-head machine screw on the clamp was halfway out the hole and missing its nut! I've coated the 10mm bolts on the tray with some penetrating oil while I go pick up some misc hardware. It means I'll have to do another test fitting but I want to do this right the first time.

As for the fuel pump harness: I plan to fabricate a new one from scratch once this old pump kicks it. I'm also looking into replacement grommet down the line from McMaster-Carr. Hopefully this will help us keep these cars running for longer. :D
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Old 01-22-2019, 11:36 PM   #74
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Now that the wiring connector was rebuilt with some...serviceable soldering, I turned my attention to putting it back. All the lines came back together except for the line from the accumulator to the main. Now that was a good 1/4" short. Now, I know that this is the right part: confirmed it on multiple sites and I even have the old one in my shed somewhere.

Took a look at the pump and noticed there was an inch or so space in either direction not caked in (as much) dirt, suggesting that it wiggled around enough to avoid getting dirty. Sure enough, the Phillips-head machine screw on the clamp was halfway out the hole and missing its nut! I've coated the 10mm bolts on the tray with some penetrating oil while I go pick up some misc hardware. It means I'll have to do another test fitting but I want to do this right the first time.

As for the fuel pump harness: I plan to fabricate a new one from scratch once this old pump kicks it. I'm also looking into replacement grommet down the line from McMaster-Carr. Hopefully this will help us keep these cars running for longer. :D
I get where you’re at. Here is my 38 year old fuel pump harness:


cool car dude keep it moving👌🏻
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Old 02-15-2019, 09:26 PM   #75
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Came back to it only to find a flat battery. Engine cranks, it struggles to fire, and it dies. 10 years was a good run.

Last edited by snailmale; 02-15-2019 at 09:35 PM..
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