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Old 05-10-2017, 05:12 PM   #1
mtd240
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Default Clutch cable - different M46/M45?

Hey guys - have a '78 242 with a '90 B230f and an M46 from a late 80s 740 (not sure of the exact year, or if it really matters).

Everything is together, engine runs great. Something is off with the clutch though. It was on the floor when I installed the clutch cable (as-is), without adjusting. After adjusting it ALL THE WAY out, the pedal is up in the normal position but it still isn't disengaging the clutch.

My main question: Do I have the wrong clutch cable? I'm pretty sure it's from an M46 (bought it from KJets On A Plane a while back).
Second question: Is there supposed to be a rubber damper/block of some sort where the cable attaches to the clutch fork? I know the M47 uses one - not sure about the M46.



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Old 05-10-2017, 05:23 PM   #2
EivlEvo
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In your second pic it looks like the rubber "bushing" that would go between the cable ball end, and the infamous "block of iron" damper is gone. Additionally, you do not have the iron damper. Now... I'm not certain that these are actually "necessary" as the goal is effectively to be able to actuate your clutch fork/PP.

But they're not in those pictures.

You can see the rubber bushing and the metal hunk dampener in this photo.


Finally, I did an entire writeup on this job... should you decide to grab one of the mediocre aftermarket ones, know that there are two sizes and that the manufacturers and distributors are in general, unaware of this.
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Old 05-10-2017, 06:38 PM   #3
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The block of iron is a counterweight used on turbos and diesels. The rest got the standard rubber bushing (30) and metal washer (32).

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Old 05-10-2017, 06:43 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hiperfauto View Post
The block of iron is a counterweight used on turbos and diesels. The rest got the standard rubber bushing (30) and metal washer (32).
the N/A 1986 245 I pulled all my m46 swap parts had the iron block
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Old 05-10-2017, 06:51 PM   #5
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There's a smaller counterweight (29a) that was used on the later cars after a certain chassis #. It wasn't in the '79-'84 catalog that first pic came from.

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Old 05-10-2017, 08:29 PM   #6
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Interesting...I never knew about the "iron dampener"...I don't fully follow what benefit it adds...less vibration in the clutch pedal (not that there is much there to begin with)?
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Old 05-10-2017, 08:52 PM   #7
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Either way, still need to know if I've got the right clutch cable or not. I suppose adding the damper (or any sort of washer) will give me more clutch cable adjustment to play with.
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Old 05-10-2017, 10:30 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mtd240 View Post
Either way, still need to know if I've got the right clutch cable or not. I suppose adding the damper (or any sort of washer) will give me more clutch cable adjustment to play with.
This, the rubber spacer and washer will move the adjustment farther up the cable.
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Old 05-11-2017, 12:27 AM   #9
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Quote:
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This, the rubber spacer and washer will move the adjustment farther up the cable.
My 87 244 M47 had the parts I pictured stock as far as I know.
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Old 05-14-2017, 07:38 PM   #10
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Do yourself a big favor and Throw that aftermarket plastic adjuster horrible awful cable in the trash (or trunk in case of possible remote dire emergency where something is better than nothing) before it pulls thru the firewall, wears out the clutch pedal or god knows what.
They stretch and require constant adjustment from day 1 and the adjustment range isn't ever very useful or quite right. They also bind and never operate as smoothly as OE. The nice OE metal sheath cables are NLA. I most certainly didn't and would wish one of those cables on my own worst enemy.

Apart from diesel (different pedal end more like a 700 with the rubber damper on the pedal end as well as the trans) and I believe the 84.5 240tic with the stiff pressure plate but flat flywheel still and heavy foot stomper clutch, 240s m45/6/7 take the same cable otherwise Of the LHD 4-cylinder SOHC engine cars to my knowledge.


The 140 cables last well and have that elegant "hook" design on the pedal as opposed to the pin that you have to grease and lube or else it will cause weird wear that opens up the hole in the pedal or snaps the cable prematurely.

Good luck.
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Old 05-15-2017, 10:10 AM   #11
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Wait, Kjets are you saying we can use the 140 cables?

And/or what other options for cables do we have? I'm using one of those plastic cables and it's... not ideal to adjust... getting ready to swap T5 into auto... so now is a good time to swap out if I can.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kjets On a Plane View Post
Do yourself a big favor and Throw that aftermarket plastic adjuster horrible awful cable in the trash (or trunk in case of possible remote dire emergency where something is better than nothing) before it pulls thru the firewall, wears out the clutch pedal or god knows what.
They stretch and require constant adjustment from day 1 and the adjustment range isn't ever very useful or quite right. They also bind and never operate as smoothly as OE. The nice OE metal sheath cables are NLA. I most certainly didn't and would wish one of those cables on my own worst enemy.

Apart from diesel (different pedal end more like a 700 with the rubber damper on the pedal end as well as the trans) and I believe the 84.5 240tic with the stiff pressure plate but flat flywheel still and heavy foot stomper clutch, 240s m45/6/7 take the same cable otherwise Of the LHD 4-cylinder SOHC engine cars to my knowledge.


The 140 cables last well and have that elegant "hook" design on the pedal as opposed to the pin that you have to grease and lube or else it will cause weird wear that opens up the hole in the pedal or snaps the cable prematurely.

Good luck.
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Old 05-15-2017, 11:10 AM   #12
mtd240
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Thanks, got any good sources for the old-school cables? Guess it would have to be used.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kjets On a Plane View Post
Do yourself a big favor and Throw that aftermarket plastic adjuster horrible awful cable in the trash (or trunk in case of possible remote dire emergency where something is better than nothing) before it pulls thru the firewall, wears out the clutch pedal or god knows what.
They stretch and require constant adjustment from day 1 and the adjustment range isn't ever very useful or quite right. They also bind and never operate as smoothly as OE. The nice OE metal sheath cables are NLA. I most certainly didn't and would wish one of those cables on my own worst enemy.

Apart from diesel (different pedal end more like a 700 with the rubber damper on the pedal end as well as the trans) and I believe the 84.5 240tic with the stiff pressure plate but flat flywheel still and heavy foot stomper clutch, 240s m45/6/7 take the same cable otherwise Of the LHD 4-cylinder SOHC engine cars to my knowledge.


The 140 cables last well and have that elegant "hook" design on the pedal as opposed to the pin that you have to grease and lube or else it will cause weird wear that opens up the hole in the pedal or snaps the cable prematurely.

Good luck.
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Old 05-15-2017, 02:41 PM   #13
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I have good used metal sheath cables with the sliding self-lubricating liner in good shape...

I was just commenting on the design of the oe 140 cable, never tried to fit it to a 240 and it most certainly doesn't fit as-is and the correct fitting oe 140 cable is nla anyway. That was just a side note.
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