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Old 10-30-2019, 02:24 PM   #26
2manyturbos
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Sorry numb nuts. That's what an LS is designed to run at. Your car may run at 230 degrees. I've had close to 300 redblock Volvos and not one of them ran that hot. The gages in my Camaros are very accurate. All 10 of them that I have owned agreed with each other. They will hit 230 after a hard 2 minute Autocross run and then cool right back down while sitting there idling waiting for my next run. That's what the electric fans are for. So, explain why when your well maintained Volvo is idling, making zero power it is running at 230 degrees. Hook up a scan tool? That's absolute genius. Where do you think it is getting its coolant temperature information from?
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Old 10-30-2019, 02:30 PM   #27
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Sorry numb nuts. That's what an LS is designed to run at. Your car may run at 230 degrees. I've had close to 300 redblock Volvos and not one of them ran that hot. The gages in my Camaros are very accurate. All 10 of them that I have owned agreed with each other. They will hit 230 after a hard 2 minute Autocross run and then cool right back down while sitting there idling waiting for my next run. That's what the electric fans are for. So, explain why when your well maintained Volvo is idling, making zero power it is running at 230 degrees. Hook up a scan tool? That's absolute genius. Where do you think it is getting its coolant temperature information from?
You also are the same person who insists that a GM northstar is a good engine because you mom had one and it got 'really good fuel economy'. That's a simple biased sample fallacy. Everyone knows they are junk and it took GM how many years to make a northstar that didn't rip those puny head bolts out of the block? That's right, 11 years. No big deal though all you have to do to fix GMs **** ups is pull the engine, disassemble, drill out your block for the proper LS sized head studs, and toss it back together.

And no, I have verified temps with a calibrated infrared thermometer. The fact that your car gets 'hot' during a TWO MINUTE abuse session says your cooling system is ****. I can hold 2nd gear burnouts until tires pop on a junkyard turbo 240 with a clutch fan and maintain 200F coolant temps. GM runs their **** hot for economy/power sure, but certainly not for longevity.
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Old 10-30-2019, 02:33 PM   #28
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And yes, maybe the LS is DESIGNED to run at those temps, redblocks aren't. They changed absolutely nothing about redblocks, but omitted the clutch fan for an efan.
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Old 10-30-2019, 02:45 PM   #29
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Yes, redblocks are designed to run that warm. That isn’t hot by any means. Do a little research on combustion efficiency and you might learn something instead of just making it up as you post. The thermostat opening temperature for a redblock is basically unchanged for the last 30 years. The electric cooling fan arrangement is much more efficient than the mechanical fan. The radiator is huge by comparison. Most of my electric fan and equipped cars don’t even turn the fan on unless I am in traffic with the AC on.
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Old 10-30-2019, 02:59 PM   #30
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Yes, redblocks are designed to run that warm. That isn’t hot by any means. Do a little research on combustion efficiency and you might learn something instead of just making it up as you post. The thermostat opening temperature for a redblock is basically unchanged for the last 30 years. The electric cooling fan arrangement is much more efficient than the mechanical fan. The radiator is huge by comparison. Most of my electric fan and equipped cars don’t even turn the fan on unless I am in traffic with the AC on.
There’s that word again. I don't give a **** about efficiency and neither do most people. But dang it sure helps sell a car doesn’t it? I’ll opt for reliability over efficiency any day.

And yes, Volvo used a much larger radiator on efan cars because they don’t want to use that fan unless absolutely necessary, so they used a huge radiator in hopes that it’ll do the job of keeping the engine cool. Temps creep up and up unless you’re constantly moving.

Your LS car gets to 230F after 2 minutes of abuse and you have to let it sit there and idle to get back down to where it 'should' be.

See if you can follow this. I have to pull in to the grid because my time on the course is over. We take turns running the course. My cooling system is working perfectly. Just like it does in my Mustang GT. 20 minute sessions at high throttle settings on Oregon Raceway Park road race course didn't even cause the gage to move off center. The car has the performance package, which includes an oil cooler and larger radiator. The Camaro SS is the same way. Designed to run at high speed for extended periods. It doesn't heat up or overheat. It also starts out at much higher temperatures than older cars. That is because engineers understand what is going on with the internal combustion engine. My 2017 GT makes 435 HP and will pull 29 MPG at 65 MPH. The 2018-19 5.0 makes 460 HP. See what efficiency can do for an engine?

Last edited by 2manyturbos; 10-30-2019 at 03:23 PM..
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Old 10-30-2019, 03:02 PM   #31
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Can you explain why they used the 150kpa cap on 7/9 cars and ran them way hotter? I guess for a negligible amount of better efficiency at the cost of: leaky heater control valves which in turn cause you to run out of coolant and toast your engine. The Redblock car was founded on simplicity, not efficiency.
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Old 10-30-2019, 03:04 PM   #32
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None of this conversation actually matters.

OP, get the cheapest aluminum+plastic rad off rock auto and don’t over think it. They are absolutely sufficient at keeping 100hp cool, no matter what you’re doing.
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Old 10-30-2019, 03:05 PM   #33
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You also are the same person who insists that a GM northstar is a good engine because you mom had one and it got 'really good fuel economy'. That's a simple biased sample fallacy. Everyone knows they are junk and it took GM how many years to make a northstar that didn't rip those puny head bolts out of the block? That's right, 11 years. No big deal though all you have to do to fix GMs **** ups is pull the engine, disassemble, drill out your block for the proper LS sized head studs, and toss it back together.

And no, I have verified temps with a calibrated infrared thermometer. The fact that your car gets 'hot' during a TWO MINUTE abuse session says your cooling system is ****. I can hold 2nd gear burnouts until tires pop on a junkyard turbo 240 with a clutch fan and maintain 200F coolant temps. GM runs their **** hot for economy/power sure, but certainly not for longevity.
Right. Back yard hack. Do a burn out until the tires pop. Run an engine with no coolant to see how long it lasts. More of the same kind of stuff people tune in to jackass to watch. Try running a redblock for a sustained 30 minute heat road racing and see where your temperatures climb to. Oh, wait a minute, you have never done anything like that. You have zero basis for actually heat soaking a cooling system. A 2 minute near wide open run will generate a lot of heat. The Z28 fans aren't even designed to come on until 215+ degrees. The second fan kicks in at ~ 230. By the time I pull back in to the grid, they are just coming on. The cooling system is doing exactly what it was designed to do. I know that's flying so far over your head you can't even grasp what is going on. Kind of like a spy run with an SR-71.

If you did a bit of research on the Northstar you would realize GM corrected the head bolt issue. The problem was highly exaggerated. Those engines were a highly efficient engine. 30+ MPG in a 6000 lb vehicle is impressive. That, and 300 hp. Three for three with zero problems. Yeah, they were such a terrible design.
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Old 10-30-2019, 03:15 PM   #34
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Originally Posted by iHateVolvoPeople View Post
None of this conversation actually matters.

OP, get the cheapest aluminum+plastic rad off rock auto and don’t over think it. They are absolutely sufficient at keeping 100hp cool, no matter what you’re doing.
Wrong. Go run your 240 flat out for 30 minutes on a hot day and see what that temperature gage says. Tony, (reeferman) would disagree with you and he actually ran his 240 like that regularly. He finally went away from the stocker aluminum radiator when his temps were hitting a sustained 250 degrees for the majority of his sessions. He sent someone down to pick up a nice Nissens 3 row brass/copper core radiator I had and his temps dropped to 200 degrees that weekend. For a typical 240, the stock radiator is fine. Make a record 2 minute hill climb run, not even close to enough cooling capacity with that 2 row aluminum core. For the OP, I would snatch up an all metal radiator if possible if he plans to keep the car. A plastic radiator is designed to run 10 years or less.

Efficiency does matter. HP is efficiency. They are the one and same thing. That concept is completely wasted on you.
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Old 10-30-2019, 03:37 PM   #35
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Right. Back yard hack. Do a burn out until the tires pop. Run an engine with no coolant to see how long it lasts. More of the same kind of stuff people tune in to jackass to watch. Try running a redblock for a sustained 30 minute heat road racing and see where your temperatures climb to. Oh, wait a minute, you have never done anything like that. You have zero basis for actually heat soaking a cooling system. A 2 minute near wide open run will generate a lot of heat. The Z28 fans aren't even designed to come on until 215+ degrees. The second fan kicks in at ~ 230. By the time I pull back in to the grid, they are just coming on. The cooling system is doing exactly what it was designed to do. I know that's flying so far over your head you can't even grasp what is going on. Kind of like a spy run with an SR-71.

If you did a bit of research on the Northstar you would realize GM corrected the head bolt issue. The problem was highly exaggerated. Those engines were a highly efficient engine. 30+ MPG in a 6000 lb vehicle is impressive. That, and 300 hp. Three for three with zero problems. Yeah, they were such a terrible design.
"Highly exaggerated"


https://stlouis.craigslist.org/pts/d...000727482.html
Quote:
head gaskets bad
https://stlouis.craigslist.org/pts/d...001803592.html

https://stlouis.craigslist.org/pts/d...001809717.html

https://stlouis.craigslist.org/pts/d...975084111.html

https://stlouis.craigslist.org/for/d...995723048.html

https://stlouis.craigslist.org/ctd/d...996598935.html



I'm not saying they weren't fuel efficient and quick, but they are still junk. They WILL blow headgaskets if not 04+, it's just a matter of time. If you have to re-engineer an entire engine design to make it reliable, it was never good to begin with.

Sure running a 240 for 30 minutes of abuse gets stuff hot, northstars break at stock power levels.
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Old 10-30-2019, 03:55 PM   #36
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Folks on here don't know a good deal when they see it.
how psi stock cna support?

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Old 10-30-2019, 04:05 PM   #37
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Nearly every engine made will have head gasket failures, including Toyotas. Your craigslist ads don't ad up to much. You have no idea how any of those cars were maintained. There are no statistics on the number of failures vs. cars on the road. Most of the time the head gaskets fail because people don't understand the need for coolant system flushes and new coolant. Or, they are running the cars with coolant leaks or non-working cooling fans. Ignorance is not bliss. That redblock or Toyota head you had shaved is a perfect example of that. Electrolysis eating up the aluminum. One of my customers brought his 940 to me this week to evaluate it as a long term keeper since it now has 300,000+ miles on it. He had straight water in it because he has a water pump leaking. The car checked out fine. It runs and drives perfectly. It needs new motor mounts, a water pump, new timing belt and seals and a set of spark plugs put in it. I'm doing all the work it needs starting tomorrow.
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Old 10-30-2019, 04:15 PM   #38
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Nearly every engine made will have head gasket failures, including Toyotas. Your craigslist ads don't ad up to much. You have no idea how any of those cars were maintained. There are no statistics on the number of failures vs. cars on the road. Most of the time the head gaskets fail because people don't understand the need for coolant system flushes and new coolant. Or, they are running the cars with coolant leaks or non-working cooling fans. Ignorance is not bliss. That redblock or Toyota head you had shaved is a perfect example of that. Electrolysis eating up the aluminum. One of my customers brought his 940 to me this week to evaluate it as a long term keeper since it now has 300,000+ miles on it. He had straight water in it because he has a water pump leaking. The car checked out fine. It runs and drives perfectly. It needs new motor mounts, a water pump, new timing belt and seals and a set of spark plugs put in it. I'm doing all the work it needs starting tomorrow.
The difference being that the Toyota engine i had resurfaced was *severely* neglected, had 290k+ miles, was over heating, and *stilllll* didn’t blow the head gasket. Once it was warm, compression was perfect. North Star engines, especially the early ones, are absolutely guaranteed to fail regardless of how well maintained they are. Just search the forums.

You can blame it on maintenance negligence but that is clearly not the case considering people neglect Toyotas too and I see them with 300,000 miles on them still running and driving. Show me a running and driving Northstar engine with over 200,000 miles on it (pre 04) that doesn’t need the heads pulled to fix GMs **** up. It is a **** design. GM cheaped out to save money and it bit every consumer in the ass. Stop lying to yourself.

And I went through the same electrolysis issue on a 740 that was always very neglected. The car had dirt water for coolant, saw regular 6000rpm neutral bombs, 200k miles, and never batted an eye. Though I did put a new trans and rear end in it.

The fact of the matter is, dex kill is trash and GM has no excuse for using it. The head bolt design is also trash. Toyota and Volvo built cars to last, GM built cars to make money. I’m not blaming them for that.
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Old 10-30-2019, 04:21 PM   #39
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Here's what a well engineered vehicle is capable of. Not that I actually expect you'll read this..


https://www.toyotanation.com/threads...#post-14140672

1995 LE 2.2 L 4 cylinder, 5S-FE. 515,007 miles, runs almost like new, all systems performing well. Original engine and transmission/differential (AC is cold, initial temp 37.8º expansion valve works intermittently, would soon need replacement). It will soon, under it's own power, make it's terminal trip to the auto salvage yard crusher.

Body and interior are in fair condition. There is a small rust area on the driver side rear quarter panel and across the top windshield frame.

Since new, it has been driven in a Midwest rust belt state. Never garaged, until 2017. The quality of the manufactures paint was excellent. Waxed and buffed twice a year.

Washed usually every two to three weeks, more in the Winter, particularly the underside areas.

Two unexpected repairs, caused by debris in the roadway, each resulting in replacement of the exhaust system flex pipe. In 2001, ran over a tire on the highway, going about 65 miles per hour, at night. It happened again in 2011, when unable to avoid another tire in the roadway, while driving in heavy traffic.

All other parts of the exhaust system are original. The original alternator was replaced in 2008 (409k miles, voltage regulator).

Has original, upper and lower radiator hose (annual coolant flush, hoses are in like new condition), vacuum lines, oxygen sensor, master cylinder, AC compressor, evaporator, receiver dryer, condenser, expansion valve, power steering pump, plug wires and more.

One check engine light in 2004, replaced the EGR valve.

The original starter (450k miles) was replaced by the dealership in 2012, after misdiagnosing an intermittent starting problem. DIY, replaced the Neutral Safety Switch, which fixed the starting problem, with helpful information from the Toyota Nation forums.

In the spring of 2004 (250k miles), an intermittent problem started. It would start missing, losing power, then regain power. Eventually there was a crank/no start.

The dealership had a difficult time correctly diagnosing the problem. Checked fuel system, vacuum lines, some of the electrical system components. Installing a new distributor cap/rotor, did not fix the problem. Replacing the ignition coil (it had a hairline crack) fixed the problem.

In 2013, (478K miles) DIY installed four Quick Struts, front/rear sway bar links, and upper/lower control arms.

In 2015 (492k miles), the Camry was offered at no cost, to a relative. In the interest of safety, four new tires were installed (Bridgestone 205/65R15 Ecopia Ep422). A complete front and rear brake job (new rotors/ wheel cylinders, hardware, replacing the original, calipers, rotors, wheel cylinders).

The front brake pads (only OEM pads used) over the years, were replaced three times, averaging over a 160,000 miles between replacement. Rear brake pads were replaced once, at 492k miles.

After inspection of the brake lines, because of some corrosion, all new brakes lines were installed.

Because of excessive bushing wear and noise, the rear adjustable control arm bushings were replaced.

Confident, with proper maintenance, it could run another 100k or more miles.

After the work, the relative did not want the Camry. For the last four years it has been driven very little, under 6k miles per year. Recently completed a 450 mile trip, averaged 32.7 mpg, at an average speed of around 70 mph.

It has been a very reliable car. But for a few operator error caused problems, for example, allowing the fuel light to indicate empty once to often, causing failure of the fuel pump, from frequent low fuel levels (unaware fuel helps cool the fuel pump motor). Happened in 2008, since then, the fuel tank has never below quarter full.

Cost of ownership per mile to date: Includes purchase price, finance charges, maintenance, service, repairs, insurance, fuel, license fees and other miscellaneous cost (sound system, four radio's, broken driver side door handle, installed alarm system, ect).

Performed 145 DIY oil changes, using Quaker State 10W 30 oil (3,500 average miles), and adding a half quart of Rislone Engine Treatment with every oil change. Used OEM genuine Toyota oil filters. Mostly used OEM parts and fluids for all maintenance and service.

1995 – 2019: 15,394 gallons of fuel consumed

$28,924 cost of fuel (lowest price per gallon, 0.86¢ highest $3.94) average $1.88

33.4 miles per gallon average (about 75/25 highway/city). For many years the commute to work was just over 2 miles during the week (averaged 25 – 28 mpg). Highest fuel economy was 37.3 mpg on a 900 mile trip, with a strong tailwind, for most of the trip.

Total cost of ownership so far: $88,286, which is about 0.17¢ per mile. If depreciation is included, 0.21¢ (depreciated down to zero, or scrap value), which is approximately $307 per month, $376 per month with depreciation included.

From 1995 to 2012 almost all service and scheduled maintenance, was preformed by the dealership (image of a late 90's early aughts dealer recommended service brochure), so the cost were significantly higher then an independent service shop

A valve adjustment was done once, in 1997 at 60k miles (not sure if it was a recommended manufacturers service). Had five timing/drive belt changes, since the original belts were changed at 60k miles.

Last timing/drive belt change was in 2012 (475k miles). Installed a new water pump and thermostat (replacing the original water pump and thermostat). Also installed new oil seals.

Last year, with assistance, replaced the head gasket (some oil seepage) and harmonic balancer (rubber ring deterioration).



Here's what a well engineered vehicle is capable of.
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Old 10-30-2019, 04:29 PM   #40
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Well, all 3 Northstar Cadillacs my folks own/owned were pre 2004 Northstars and they had zero head bolt or head gasket failures. Like I said, exaggerated claims. I see these Northstar powered cars running all over here in the North West. Let me guarantee you, if one blew a head gasket, nobody is going to fix it. So, explain why so many are still on the road out here. Could it be that their failure rate is/was completely exaggerated? Yes, it could be and is the reason why. The cars are worth $3,000-$5,000. A head gasket job approaches that amount.

Toyota is no different than any other manufacturer. The idea that Toyotas are superior in design to other makes is a myth that advertisers created. There are plenty of Toyota designs that were/are complete failures. GM was probably the worst of the lot. I'll agree with you there.
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Old 10-30-2019, 04:38 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by iHateVolvoPeople View Post
Here's what a well engineered vehicle is capable of. Not that I actually expect you'll read this..


https://www.toyotanation.com/threads...#post-14140672

1995 LE 2.2 L 4 cylinder, 5S-FE. 515,007 miles, runs almost like new, all systems performing well. Original engine and transmission/differential (AC is cold, initial temp 37.8º expansion valve works intermittently, would soon need replacement). It will soon, under it's own power, make it's terminal trip to the auto salvage yard crusher.

Body and interior are in fair condition. There is a small rust area on the driver side rear quarter panel and across the top windshield frame.

Since new, it has been driven in a Midwest rust belt state. Never garaged, until 2017. The quality of the manufactures paint was excellent. Waxed and buffed twice a year.

Washed usually every two to three weeks, more in the Winter, particularly the underside areas.

Two unexpected repairs, caused by debris in the roadway, each resulting in replacement of the exhaust system flex pipe. In 2001, ran over a tire on the highway, going about 65 miles per hour, at night. It happened again in 2011, when unable to avoid another tire in the roadway, while driving in heavy traffic.

All other parts of the exhaust system are original. The original alternator was replaced in 2008 (409k miles, voltage regulator).

Has original, upper and lower radiator hose (annual coolant flush, hoses are in like new condition), vacuum lines, oxygen sensor, master cylinder, AC compressor, evaporator, receiver dryer, condenser, expansion valve, power steering pump, plug wires and more.

One check engine light in 2004, replaced the EGR valve.

The original starter (450k miles) was replaced by the dealership in 2012, after misdiagnosing an intermittent starting problem. DIY, replaced the Neutral Safety Switch, which fixed the starting problem, with helpful information from the Toyota Nation forums.

In the spring of 2004 (250k miles), an intermittent problem started. It would start missing, losing power, then regain power. Eventually there was a crank/no start.

The dealership had a difficult time correctly diagnosing the problem. Checked fuel system, vacuum lines, some of the electrical system components. Installing a new distributor cap/rotor, did not fix the problem. Replacing the ignition coil (it had a hairline crack) fixed the problem.

In 2013, (478K miles) DIY installed four Quick Struts, front/rear sway bar links, and upper/lower control arms.

In 2015 (492k miles), the Camry was offered at no cost, to a relative. In the interest of safety, four new tires were installed (Bridgestone 205/65R15 Ecopia Ep422). A complete front and rear brake job (new rotors/ wheel cylinders, hardware, replacing the original, calipers, rotors, wheel cylinders).

The front brake pads (only OEM pads used) over the years, were replaced three times, averaging over a 160,000 miles between replacement. Rear brake pads were replaced once, at 492k miles.

After inspection of the brake lines, because of some corrosion, all new brakes lines were installed.

Because of excessive bushing wear and noise, the rear adjustable control arm bushings were replaced.

Confident, with proper maintenance, it could run another 100k or more miles.

After the work, the relative did not want the Camry. For the last four years it has been driven very little, under 6k miles per year. Recently completed a 450 mile trip, averaged 32.7 mpg, at an average speed of around 70 mph.

It has been a very reliable car. But for a few operator error caused problems, for example, allowing the fuel light to indicate empty once to often, causing failure of the fuel pump, from frequent low fuel levels (unaware fuel helps cool the fuel pump motor). Happened in 2008, since then, the fuel tank has never below quarter full.

Cost of ownership per mile to date: Includes purchase price, finance charges, maintenance, service, repairs, insurance, fuel, license fees and other miscellaneous cost (sound system, four radio's, broken driver side door handle, installed alarm system, ect).

Performed 145 DIY oil changes, using Quaker State 10W 30 oil (3,500 average miles), and adding a half quart of Rislone Engine Treatment with every oil change. Used OEM genuine Toyota oil filters. Mostly used OEM parts and fluids for all maintenance and service.

1995 – 2019: 15,394 gallons of fuel consumed

$28,924 cost of fuel (lowest price per gallon, 0.86¢ highest $3.94) average $1.88

33.4 miles per gallon average (about 75/25 highway/city). For many years the commute to work was just over 2 miles during the week (averaged 25 – 28 mpg). Highest fuel economy was 37.3 mpg on a 900 mile trip, with a strong tailwind, for most of the trip.

Total cost of ownership so far: $88,286, which is about 0.17¢ per mile. If depreciation is included, 0.21¢ (depreciated down to zero, or scrap value), which is approximately $307 per month, $376 per month with depreciation included.

From 1995 to 2012 almost all service and scheduled maintenance, was preformed by the dealership (image of a late 90's early aughts dealer recommended service brochure), so the cost were significantly higher then an independent service shop

A valve adjustment was done once, in 1997 at 60k miles (not sure if it was a recommended manufacturers service). Had five timing/drive belt changes, since the original belts were changed at 60k miles.

Last timing/drive belt change was in 2012 (475k miles). Installed a new water pump and thermostat (replacing the original water pump and thermostat). Also installed new oil seals.

Last year, with assistance, replaced the head gasket (some oil seepage) and harmonic balancer (rubber ring deterioration).



Here's what a well engineered vehicle is capable of.
Dude,

My Ford F250 has 295,000 miles on it. So far, I've had to replace the transmission at 185,000 miles. It was and still is used for heavy towing. Other than that, I replaced the water pump about 3,000 miles ago. The starter 5,000 miles ago and the heater blower motor 2,000 miles ago. The rest of the investment has been routine maintenance parts. Brake pads, spark plugs, belts, oil changes, and tires. I bought the truck for $3,000 and probably have another $3,000 in it over the last 145,000 miles I have driven it. Fuel injection made engines so much more efficient they last much longer when properly cared for. $6,000 vs. $88,000. Do the math, who do you think got a better deal?
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Old 10-30-2019, 04:38 PM   #42
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Originally Posted by 2manyturbos View Post
Well, all 3 Northstar Cadillacs my folks own/owned were pre 2004 Northstars and they had zero head bolt or head gasket failures.
What's the max recorded mileage on any of your family's unopened northstar engines?

Quote:
Like I said, exaggerated claims. I see these Northstar powered cars running all over here in the North West. Let me guarantee you, if one blew a head gasket, nobody is going to fix it. So, explain why so many are still on the road out here. Could it be that their failure rate is/was completely exaggerated? Yes, it could be and is the reason why. The cars are worth $3,000-$5,000. A head gasket job approaches that amount.
I rarely see them on the road. I see WAY more old toyotas/fords/hondas etc than any northstar cars. And people certainly do repair them. http://www.northstarperformance.com/sgstuds.php
I have read through this site, and watched many videos on the procedure for curiosity sakes. I will never ever willingly own one, but I enjoy the research on them.

Quote:
Toyota is no different than any other manufacturer. The idea that Toyotas are superior in design to other makes is a myth that advertisers created.
I have empirical evidence that proves otherwise. Toyota drivers neglect the crap out of their cars so often, but I still can find a 300k Mile running and driving toyota on CL any day of the week. Here is a prime example. https://stlouis.craigslist.org/cto/d...005072920.html
Quote:
There are plenty of Toyota designs that were/are complete failures. GM was probably the worst of the lot. I'll agree with you there.
Not going to disagree. The 02-11(?) 4 banger 2azfe engine was not very great. Sure you could make over 300k miles if you VERY regularly checked the oil. Same case with the 1zzfe engines. Massive oil consumption issues and is well documented online just like the northstars. And no, toyotas issues are not exaggerated either. My dad had an 02 camry with 60k miles on it that was meticulously maintained. Full synthetic oil changes every 3k (which is excessive) miles by my dad. That piece of **** was very reliable but would smoke out my driveway on cold starts.
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Old 10-30-2019, 04:40 PM   #43
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Dude,

My Ford F250 has 295,000 miles on it. So far, I've had to replace the transmission at 185,000 miles. It was and still is used for heavy towing. Other than that, I replaced the water pump about 3,000 miles ago. The starter 5,000 miles ago and the heater blower motor 2,000 miles ago. The rest of the investment has been routine maintenance parts. Brake pads, spark plugs, belts, oil changes, and tires. I bought the truck for $3,000 and probably have another $3,000 in it over the last 145,000 miles I have driven it. Fuel injection made engines so much more efficient they last much longer when properly cared for. $6,000 vs. $88,000. Do the math, who do you think got a better deal?
I have no issues with ford trucks. They are generally wonderfully reliable. Even the 3v 5.4 is 'okay' if you don't mind ripping it down at 100k and doing tensioners.
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Old 10-30-2019, 04:51 PM   #44
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The 1996 Deville had 175,000 miles on it when it was replaced with the 2000 Deville about 6 years ago. That 96 is still on the road. The 2000 Deville had 150K on it when it was replaced by a 2002 Deville last year. That 2000 is still on the road. I did have to replace the plastic/aluminum radiator on the 2000. It had a slow seep/leak and it was replaced to keep from overheating the engine. I had to replace the water pump on the 96 during the time we had it. Those cars have a coolant level warning light on them. There is no excuse for running them low. The replacement 2002 came from an estate sale with 79K on it. That will likely be the last Cadillac in our family. My mom is 94 now. My sister drives the Cadillac so that my mom has something comfortable to ride in that she can actually get in at her age.
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Old 10-30-2019, 04:56 PM   #45
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The 1996 Deville had 175,000 miles on it when it was replaced with the 2000 Deville about 6 years ago. That 96 is still on the road. The 2000 Deville had 150K on it when it was replaced by a 2002 Deville last year. That 2000 is still on the road. I did have to replace the plastic/aluminum radiator on the 2000. It had a slow seep/leak and it was replaced to keep from overheating the engine. I had to replace the water pump on the 96 during the time we had it. Those cars have a coolant level warning light on them. There is no excuse for running them low. The replacement 2002 came from an estate sale with 79K on it. That will likely be the last Cadillac in our family. My mom is 94 now. My sister drives the Cadillac so that my mom has something comfortable to ride in that she can actually get in at her age.
Perhaps we just have different ideas of reliability. That is fine. 175k miles 6 years ago, how many now? Are you positive it hasn't been torn down?


Radiator is a normal wear item above 100k in my opinion.

Fun fact, I have every maintenance record for my 99 Camry from the original owner, and the OE radiator made it to 249k miles before the end tanks started slowly seeping. I have since swapped it out.

My 94 miata M edition had 94k miles before the radiator started leaking. Maintenance sure goes a long way.
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Old 10-30-2019, 05:03 PM   #46
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They were all untouched sub 100K miles cars when purchased. They were actually much cheaper to own and maintain than any other make of car they have ever had. I am not a Cadillac fan. At least not the Cadillacs produced after the late 60s. They are a nightmare to work on with that FWD engine set up.
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Old 10-30-2019, 05:09 PM   #47
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They were all untouched sub 100K miles cars when purchased. They were actually much cheaper to own and maintain than any other make of car they have ever had. I am not a Cadillac fan. At least not the Cadillacs produced after the late 60s. They are a nightmare to work on with that FWD engine set up.
This has been a fun discussion. Contrary to how you think I may process information, it is not in one ear and out the other. I assure you I am open minded enough to listen to what you say and will then do my own research. I am well aware that I come off stubborn, but it's just the internet

Next time I have an efan volvo around here, I'll snap some pics of the coolant temp as the fan kicks on. The bosch cars likely come on sooner since regina high speed comes on if and only if the contacts are closed in the temp sensor on the radiator end tank, compared to Bosch using the ECU to do so.
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Old 10-30-2019, 05:19 PM   #48
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This has been a fun discussion. Contrary to how you think I may process information, it is not in one ear and out the other. I assure you I am open minded enough to listen to what you say and will then do my own research. I am well aware that I come off stubborn, but it's just the internet

Next time I have an efan volvo around here, I'll snap some pics of the coolant temp as the fan kicks on. The bosch cars likely come on sooner since regina high speed comes on if and only if the contacts are closed in the temp sensor on the radiator end tank, compared to Bosch using the ECU to do so.
Out of all the 7-9s I had, only 1 was Regina. It is not very common here in Oregon. That car was a 1993 940 with electric cooling fans. That car never had any cooling problems. That said, I have no idea what temperature the fans turned on in it. They never came on when I owned it, or maintained it for the customer that bought it. That car is still on the road in Eugene. It likely has 300,000 miles on it now.
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Old 10-30-2019, 05:49 PM   #49
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Out of all the 7-9s I had, only 1 was Regina. It is not very common here in Oregon. That car was a 1993 940 with electric cooling fans. That car never had any cooling problems. That said, I have no idea what temperature the fans turned on in it. They never came on when I owned it, or maintained it for the customer that bought it. That car is still on the road in Eugene. It likely has 300,000 miles on it now.
Perhaps it is my opinion, but I think Redblock engines will last longer running at 180-200f than 230f. Engines don’t gain mileage by idling, I just prefer an engine that can idle on the hottest of days and maintain 200F. With AC on, of course they run cooler. But I have watched the Regina cars get to 230f before fans come on. This is the same Regina car that was out of coolant when I bought it, and engine didn’t sound too healthy.

This 230f certainly won’t destroy the engine (obviously), but I’m under the belief that since heat=pressure, cooling systems last longer when operating at lower temps and lower pressures.

My wife’s 744na had a leaking HCV with a 150kpa cap, and little to no leaks with the 75kpa cap. I swapped it out with a motor craft unit anyway and revamped the entire cooling system.

On a stick 8v Volvo, you’ll never notice a difference in power from running them at 180f vs 230f, but your cooling system certainly seems to be less stressed at lower temps/pressures.

No one wants to do a heater core on these things!
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Old 10-30-2019, 05:51 PM   #50
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The efan cars I buy consistently have noisier engines, even though they pretty much all have squirters. I understand that hotter operating temps equate to higher HP/efficiency, but heat also seems to cause more wear.
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