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Old 01-03-2013, 05:38 PM   #1
740atl
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Default Tb newb performance faq

Ok. As discussed in the other forum, I decided to give this a go.

I think the goal of the FAQ should be to provide QUICK, to the point information, along with a link to more advanced information. It SHOULD NOT be all-inclusive. Once the newbs get going, let them get their feet wet on their own.

For example, one could talk briefly in a paragraph or two of the various merits of CHiPS (not the 80's police drama), and then a link to one of the many excellent threads or specific posts (even better) for the newbs to peruse. Believe me, I'm a newb when it comes to the latest chip-modding stuff.

DO you want to write one of the faq's? Please PM me!

Is there anything you think should be part of the FAQ??? PM me!


If you see something that you disagree with, PM me!

If I am missing an important link, PM me!

Please, anyone PM me if you see something you like! or want to share!


I came up with a quick and dirty list of NEWB topics that seem to be addressed A LOT. It's just the first two dozen or so things to cross my mind and by all means is not all inclusive. I mean to add over time to this faq.

Lord knows I was a first timer in 2004. My first post on TB was something to the effect of "is the +T this easy or am I missing something?" I couldn't find any information in a FAQ because frankly there wasn't one. The topic had been covered many times but because I didn't even know what to search for, and I was blocked from even entering "+T" or "plus Tee" into the TB search feature, I got trolled in that first thread of course by people who said "hasn't this all been talked about before" , but I was also assisted by people that later became great friends. I think we can be nicer to our newbs because frankly, we all were one once and still might be in some areas. (**** if I know everything).

HERE GOES>>>

__________________________________________________ ____________________________

Turbobricks NEWB FAQ>
NEWBS READ HERE FIRST BEFORE POSTING. OTHERWISE THE TB TROLLS WILL EAT YOU.

MANDATORY READING FOR ANYONE CONTEMPLATING MODIFYING THEIR ENGINE.
  1. WHY I NEED TO KNOW WHAT AIR FUEL RATIO IS?
  2. WHAT IS DETONATION AND WHY CAN IT PUT HOLES IN MY 20 YEAR OLD ENGINE?
  3. CAN I BLOW UP MY MOTOR BY BEING STUPID?
  4. CAN I BLOW UP MY MOTOR BECAUSE IT IS 20 YEARS OLD?

GENERAL UPGRADES
  1. WHAT IS THE MOST COST EFFECTIVE UPGRADE?
  2. What order should I upgrade my turbo car?
  3. Can I improve the performance of my car without turbocharging?
  4. Can I install msd 6AL on my volvo?

ENGINE PERFORMANCE PARTS UPGRADES?
  1. Does anyone make H-beam connecting rods or forged pistons for my volvo?



TURBO PERFORMANCE
  1. WHAT IS THE MAXIMUM SAFE BOOST FOR MY 4 CYLINDER TURBO?
  2. WHAT IS A GOOD UPGRADE FOR MY FACTORY TURBO?
  3. I CAN GET A 60-1 FOR CHEAP. IS THIS A GOOD TURBO?
  4. I SIMPLY CANNOT LIVE WITHOUT 300 HORSEPOWER... WHAT SHOULD I DO??
  5. Best turbo for a redblock that doesn't bolt right on.

I WANT X00 HORSEPOWER. WHAT SHOULD I DO (KNOW)?
  1. WHAT MODIFICATIONS SHOULD I DO TO SUPPORT 300HP?
  2. WHAT MODIFICATIONS SHOULD I DO TO SUPPORT 400HP?
  3. WHAT MODIFICATIONS SHOULD I DO TO SUPPORT OVER 400HP?

SUSPENSION UPGRADES
  1. how much can I cut my coils?
  2. are there performance coil springs?
  3. what are the best shocks for my 240/740?
  4. Can I put coilovers on my 240/740/940?
  5. Does anyone make high tech suspension components for my volvo?

TRANSMISSION PERFORMANCE
  1. what is the best Volvo transmission to use for performance?
  2. Can I rebuild my aw71?
  3. Can the m46/m47 be upgraded?
  4. How much does it cost to upgrade to a T5/getrag/w58/r154/t56 transmission?
  5. Has anyone swapped a GM automatic in a volvo?

EXHAUST PERFORMANCE
  1. Which is better? 2.5" or 3" exhaust for a turbo car?
  2. has anyone built a custom turbo header?

FUEL INJECTION PERFORMANCE AND CHIPS
  1. What are performance chips?
  2. Are there any limitations to chips?
  3. Does anyone make a chip for lh2.2 or lh2.4?
  4. Can I modify LH2.2 or LH2.4 myself?
  5. Do they make a piggyback computer for my car?
  6. Is there an aftermarket fuel injection computer that will work with my volvo?
  7. Can I really tune it myself?
  8. Oh crap, I don't know how to install my megasquirt!
  9. What fuel injection system does my car have?

CHEAPASS PERFORMANCE... AKA JUNKYARD RACERS
  1. READ THIS FIRST. A CHEAPASS PREFACE.
  2. What's the cheapest way to go fast?
  3. I can't afford to build an engine. What's the strongest volvo engine?
  4. best bang for the buck used injectors and worst used injectors
  5. can I weld my own exhaust?
  6. Will porting my heads make any difference?
  7. More power with the b21F intake manifold swap
  8. Is the 90+ turbo manifold really better?
  9. How do I turbocharge my RWD volvo?


ENGINE SWAPS?
  1. Can I swap a v8 into my volvo?
  2. Has anyone done the LS1 swap in a 2/7/9?
  3. Will the ford 302 fit in my 240?
  4. Will a small block chevy fit in my 240?

POPULAR TB CARS
  1. 16v turbo swaps
  2. v8 swaps
  3. big power cars
  4. best looking cars
  5. fast 8v cars
  6. best money no object cars
  7. best bang for the buck
  8. sleepers

Last edited by 740atl; 10-24-2014 at 04:35 AM..
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Old 01-03-2013, 05:39 PM   #2
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Default Why i need to know what air fuel ratio is?

WHY I NEED TO KNOW WHAT AIR FUEL RATIO IS?
Air fuel ratio or AFR is literally the ratio of the mass of air entering the cylinder versus the mass of fuel. If you want to burn all of the fuel that enters the chamber, you need 14.7 parts air to do it for an AFR of 14.7:1, otherwise known as the stoichiometric ratio. Your car normally operates at “stoich” for best compromise of emissions, performance and economy. However, when you enter “boost” you are cramming more air into the cylinder which means you can burn more fuel.

Still want to run “shoich” in boost? ? No way. This time the engine wants a “richer” mixture of more fuel. Typically turbo engines will want a boost AFR to be between 11:1 and 12.5:1. If you have a turbo car already, the factory has already adjusted these settings for you in the "fuel map" of the ECU/PCM. However, these settings are most always a compromise between economy/emissions/performance in that order.

When you increase the boost and your engine is not capable of handling the additional air, your engine may run “lean” with a lack of fuel to burn the available air. Lean AFR’s can be ok for normal cruise driving, but lean in boost can quickly melt a hole in a piston or bend connecting rods or shatter the ringlands of the piston due to the damaging detonation or “pinging” explosions that occur in such conditions. It can happen faster than you think... seconds is all it takes.

Melted b230FT piston by running 14:1 AFR for prolonged times in boost.


Shattered ringlands


HOW DO I KNOW HOW MY CAR IS DOING?
Excellent question. Because unless you actively monitor the air fuel ratio, you have to assume it’s doing what the factory engineers told it to do, which means YOU DON’T KNOW ANYTHING. For most of us, this is ok, but for those of us looking to move beyond stock 5-7psi boost, you actually need to monitor the AFR.

HOW DO I MONITOR AFR?

You get a wideband air-fuel meter with a gauge. A “wideband” for short actually monitors the AFR as your engine operates. Many of the popular widebands will also have a dash-mounted gauge to show you what your AFR is doing. The $150-250 you invest in a wideband can be money well spent when it comes to saving your money from costly engine-replacement fees when you decide to increase the boost without knowing what is happening in your engine. A wideband should be the first object to purchase when considering any boost upgrades to your car.

Popular inexpensive widebands include the Innovate LC-1 with gauge, AEM 30-4100, amongst others.

The popular AEM 30-4100


A NARROWBAND O2 SENSOR IS NOT THE SAME AS A WIDEBAND SENSOR!

Lots of companies still sell the cheap "rich-lean" indicators. Don't mistake them for the wideband gauges that you need.

A narrowband O2 sensor ONLY tells you whether you are rich or lean of 14.7:1 AFR.. not HOW rich or HOW lean. They were designed for factory cars where fuel economy and emissions were top priority.

A wideband O2 sensor will tell you exactly what your AFR is, given the sensitivity of the given gauge... some have wider sensitivities than others.

In the graph below from http://www.megamanual.com/v22manual/mwire.htm#ego shows the output voltage of a wideband sensor vs. a narrowband. Note the linear relationship between voltage and AFR for the wideband whereas the narrowband is only accurate at 14.7:1 at 0.5V.


LINKS FOR MORE INFORMATION>>>>
Read this one first... by linuxman51... What is a Wideband, and why do I need it? And Basic tuning tips
Megasquirt tuning manual. Wideband vs. Narrowband sensors.
Why lean makes more power but is dangerous Garrett Turbochargers
Application Note: You CAN be too Rich Innovate Motorsports
Wideband EFI Tuning Innovate Motorsports
Tuning AFR Autospeed.
AFR for best power, NA Turbobricks
AFR Max power, Turbobricks


Tech edge widebands. Assembled and diy assembly (much cheaper) http://wbo2.com/
Innovate widebands http://www.innovatemotorsports.com/products/lc1.php
AEM widebands http://www.aemelectronics.com/wideba...fuel-gauge-25/
PLX widebands http://www.plxdevices.com/product_in...=WDBDSMAFR_DM6
14.7 dot com http://www.14point7.com/

Last edited by 740atl; 03-06-2013 at 04:47 PM..
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Old 01-03-2013, 05:40 PM   #3
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Default What is detonation and why can it put holes in my 25 year old engine?

WHAT IS DETONATION AND WHY CAN IT PUT HOLES IN MY 25 YEAR OLD ENGINE?
If you read the AIR FUEL RATIO discussion above, you will know what AFR’s are appropriate for turbo engine operation. In a nutshell, detonation can occur when the AFR is too lean for best performance.

The act of a piston rising up in a cylinder compressing the air that’s just been stuffed inside it (along with some fuel for good measure) will heat the daylights out of the entire mixture (of air and fuel). If the mixture is too lean (it doesn’t have as much fuel as it requires) it can burn REALLY HOT. If it gets too hot, it can actually self-ignite part of the mixture on one side of the chamber AFTER the spark has been delivered to the spark plug (after the engine has fired). This self-ignition (read uncontrolled combustion) EXPLOSION will collide into the already properly igniting mixture like a head on collision and can JACKNIFE, SKYROCKET, SUPERMATURBULATE the temperature and pressure inside the combustion chamber (otherwise known as the little home where your pistons, valves and cylinder head all meet together like happy neighbors). This spike in temperature and pressure can BLOW AWAY any of the protective gas barrier from the pistons/valves/head and can actually melt the aluminum pistons. Furthermore the pressure spike can bend the snot out of the connecting rods and turn them into little s-shapes. Forged steel connecting rods will only like to bend so far, and after a point, will break, usually sending the now-separated piston smashing into your head, effectively destroying it, while the remaining piece of connecting rod still attached to the happily spinning crankshaft will most likely punch several holes in your engine block/pan thus mixing the two immiscible fluids oil and coolant munching them together into a brown ooze. This happens shockingly fast and you may or may not hear the boom.

What can cause detonation to occur?
• A bad fuel injector
• Improperly sized fuel injectors (too small)
• Too much boost on an unturned engine
• Running an unturned engine
• Trusting the factory system to handle whatever you throw at it (see the “IDIOT” discussion).
• Your alternator bracket breaking dropping the voltage, slowing down your fuel pump leaning out your mixture.

What can you do to avoid detonation?
  • KNOW WHAT YOUR AFR IS AT ALL TIMES!
  • ACTIVELY MONITOR FOR DETONATION using a knock detector or det can
  • run premium fuel at all times
  • make sure you have the right sized injectors for the boost you are running.

SIGNS OF DETONATION DAMAGE

a very detonated b234f piston


little metal balls on your spark plugs... looks like pepper. That's actually little bits of aluminum that melted and deposited on your plugs.


Here you can see the peppering on the piston... oh, and the piston melted.



LINKS FOR MORE INFORMATION>>>>

Last edited by 740atl; 02-05-2013 at 04:07 PM..
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Old 01-03-2013, 05:42 PM   #4
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Default Can i blow up my motor by being stupid?

CAN I BLOW UP MY MOTOR BY BEING STUPID?

Absolutely. Volvo engines are tough, are well built, but will not tolerate fools.

You might be stupid if…
• you increase the boost on a 20 year old engine without monitoring the air fuel ratio.
• you increase the boost on an engine that is overheating or has overheated in the past.
• You ignore the marbles in a coffee can sounds coming from your engine and continue to press on the gas pedal
• Are too cheap to run premium fuel
• You are under 20 years of age and know everything because your Honda buddy told you it’s ok.
• You are simply not mechanically inclined and the idea of changing your transmission makes you ill.


LINKS FOR MORE INFORMATION>>>>

Last edited by 740atl; 02-05-2013 at 03:29 PM..
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Old 01-03-2013, 05:43 PM   #5
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Default I’m not an idiot, but can i blow up my motor/transmission because it is OLD

I’M NOT AN IDIOT, BUT CAN I BLOW UP MY MOTOR/TRANSMISSION BECAUSE IT IS 20-30 YEARS OLD?

Yes. What’s the condition of your engine? Is it at stage zero? Have you read the “am I an idiot” piece? Are you willing to admit you may need to do some research and spend some money/time working on your car? That being said, let’s assume you are mechanically inclined, but have never worked on Volvos. They’re hardy beasts, but will sometimes just blow up. Most people begin modifying these vehicles when they have 250k to 300 THOUSAND MILES ON THEM. They’re old, they’re tired. Some parts on are the verge of metal fatigue. And you want to modify them?

LINKS FOR MORE INFORMATION>>>>

Last edited by 740atl; 01-15-2013 at 06:33 PM..
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Old 01-03-2013, 05:50 PM   #6
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Default What is a good upgrade for my factory turbo?

WHAT IS A GOOD UPGRADE FOR MY FACTORY TURBO?

The turbos that came on 240/740/940’s are small, but sized appropriately for the engine and boost that will be run from the factory.

I DON'T CARE WHAT YOU SAY>>> I WANT TO PICK MY OWN TURBO. CLICK HERE.


GENERAL TURBO RELATIONSHIPS

Don't be quick to rush to the biggest turbo available for your car. Make sure to have a goal for your performance? Do you want a great all around turbo? Don't rush off towards the Holset. Want ultimate power? You won't find it with a small 15g.

IN general, when picking a turbo, the smaller it is, the faster it will spool. The Mitsubishi turbos listed on this page are very fast spooling.

In general, the smaller the turbo, the quicker it will run out of steam. This may never be a problem for you if you shift well before 5000rpm... but those with manual transmissions may wan to reach for the 19t instead of the 15g.

If the smaller the turbo the faster the spool, the larger the turbo, the slower the spool. People with automatic volvos will not enjoy their turbos reaching full boost at 4500rpm when their shift point is 5500rpm. Choose a turbo that fits in your powerband.

BOLT-ON TURBOCHARGERS
Great "bolt-on" upgrades for the Volvo 2.3L engine in terms of increasing power potential include the Garrett T3 “60-63”, the Mitsubishi 15g, 16t, 18t, and 19t. All aforementioned turbos will bolt on with very few modifications required. The Mitsubishi turbos have a better designed wastegate system with a large wastegate port which gives better boost control. The 19t is considered a great all around 270-300 rear wheel horsepower turbo with great spoolup characteristics.

TURBOS FOR THE 220whp LEVEL
If you're looking for turbochargers for the 220rwhp level (in a 3500 lb car, this can get you mid-14 second quarter miles), any of the turbos listed above would be a great upgrade. Plan on running between 12-14psi for this turbo to get to about 220rwhp. The 15g, 16t, 18t will all start to run out of steam past the 220rwhp mark.

TURBOS FOR The 250-275HP LEVEL
If you're looking for between 250-275 rear wheel horsepower, you should be looking at the T3 60-63 and the mitsu 19t. These turbos have the breathing room to support about 250-275, maybe 300hp between 20-22psi. Both turbos will be at the upper edge of their efficiency at this boost range. A 275rwhp in a 3500lb car can get you to the mid-high 13 second 1/4 mile range.
Expect full spool by 3000-3500rpm. Ok for automatics. The 19t may spool sooner.

Check out their compressor maps here for the T3 60-63 and Mitsu 19t at the 300hp mark at about 22psi.




WANT MORE POWER?

Those looking for more high end power, but still retaining fair spoolup characteristics and working great on 8v engines should look at the T04e 40 trim and 50 trim variants, supporting between 300-350rwhp. The T04e 40 trim is a great step up from the T3 "60-63" supporting to about 325hp at 25psi whereas the 50 trim version is good up to about 30psi. The T04e 50 trim is considered one of the best all around turbos. 350hp in a 3500lb car can get you mid-12 second 1/4 mile times. Expect full spool by 4000-4500rpm. Ideal for manual transmission vehicles.

The T04e 50 trim map is shown below at 28psi for about 350hp.


The holset hy35 and he351 and hx35 are also good for higher power applications while still retaining decent spoolup. The holset brand turbos mentioned above are VERY popular with breathing room up to about 40psi. Not recommended for automatics without high stall (3000 and up) torque converter.

Check out the hx35 at 35psi for about 400rwhp.



LINKS>>>>

Last edited by 740atl; 01-08-2013 at 04:30 PM..
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Old 01-03-2013, 05:51 PM   #7
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Default I can get a 60-1 for cheap. Is this a good turbo?

I CAN GET A 60-1 FOR CHEAP. IS THIS A GOOD TURBO?
Not for 2.3L 4-cylinder engines. Turbochargers are sized appropriately for a specific volume engine. The 60-1 and it’s cousins (62-1, T70) are designed for big engines and even though they may look great, simply will not provide good performance with the Volvo engine. You will be disappointed. Don’t listen to what your “honda buddy’s” are saying.

For example, check the compressor map below. The dotted lines represent where your engine would actually fall on this compressor map. The third dot from the left represents 2600rpm, the last dot 6200rpm. The line for 22.4psi is shown. Notice how you don't even cross over the surge line until about 5000rpm. This is terrible. You will hate it.

60-1 turbos are cheap for a reason... they're terrible for 4 cylinder vehicles... unless of course you own a 4.0 liter 4 cylinder vehicle.

Pass on this turbo.


Last edited by 740atl; 01-08-2013 at 04:00 PM..
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Old 01-03-2013, 05:52 PM   #8
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Default I simply cannot live without 300 horsepower... What should i do??

I SIMPLY CANNOT LIVE WITHOUT 300 HORSEPOWER... WHAT SHOULD I DO??

First of all, have you driven a car with 200rwhp? It can be fun. So is 250rwhp. 300rwhp is a different animal. 300hp from a 2.3L Volvo engine is capable of running high 12 second ¼ mile times. 300rwhp can scare you. Many people come to this hobby with a “cool” horsepower number in mind. You may want 300hp, but can you afford the basic upgrades to let you use that 300hp safely? . What is your budget, what do you want to spend? How much horsepower can you afford? Are you willing/able to replace your cylinder head/engine block when/if it explodes?

Last edited by 740atl; 01-06-2013 at 07:15 AM..
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Old 01-03-2013, 05:54 PM   #9
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Default What modifications should i do to support 300hp?

WHAT MODIFICATIONS SHOULD I DO TO SUPPORT 300HP?

The stock 90-later B230 block will handle up to about 300 rear wheel horsepower before the engine internals will want to become unseated from their natural positions. In general, even the “strong” 13mm rods (humor) will bend like limp spaghetti if they encounter ANY prolonged detonation. Pistons are robust, but ringlands can shatter easily, and if you’re really sloppy, you can melt a piston. You are almost certain to blow a headgasket at this stage just during normal horsing around and most of the time the engine will live to tell the tale (most of the time). You can tune this engine on the street but a dyno is always the best option.

For most people, this will be the highest practical horsepower limit for your car. (Yes, that's it... it's not a v8 after all) With horsepower levels around 300rwhp, you can plan to be in the low 13 to high 12 second quarter mile time area depending on traction, weight, and what type of transmission (automatics shifting faster than sticks).

For 8v people, plan on running minimum 20-25psi on a decent turbo. T04e 50 trim, holset.
For 16v people, because the head flows better out of the box, for the same power level, anywhere from 15-20psi will land you near the same power, same turbos as above.

The level of tune will alter these numbers somewhat, also what type of gasoline you're using will alter power levels.

Are you willing to deal with the financial and literal mess that a blown redblock entails? If so, consider the following

RECOMMENDED MANDATORY UPGRADES FOR THIS POWER LEVEL.
  1. AIR FUEL RATIO MONITORING WITH GAUGE
  2. BETTER INTERCOOLER
  3. HIGHER FLOWING INJECTORS think 55-65lb/hr minimum for gasoline.
  4. UPGRADED TURBO
  5. UPGRADED TRANSMISSION. (THE M46/M47 WILL NOT SURVIVE, THE AW71 CAN LIVE, BUT REQURIES ACCUMULATOR MOD). BETTER PLAN YOUR TRANSMISSION SWAP.
  6. TUNED PERFORMANCE CHIPS or TUNED AFTERMARKET EMS.
  7. 90-LATER (maybe 89’s too) BLOCK WITH 13MM RODS
  8. DETONATION-DETECTION SYSTEM (you can go cheap with a det-can)
  9. POSSIBLY E85 OR HIGHER OCTANE GAS (RACE FUEL)
  10. A HIGHER FLOWING EXHAUST... 3" diameter should be considered minimum.

Last edited by 740atl; 01-06-2013 at 07:28 AM..
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Old 01-03-2013, 05:55 PM   #10
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Default What modifications should i do to support 400hp?

WHAT MODIFICATIONS SHOULD I DO TO SUPPORT 400HP?

Now you are in “bend your rods in a second”, “melt your piston instantly”, “bammo, there goes another block” territory. THINGS HAPPEN VERY FAST at this power level.

In addition to the mods listed below, plan on the following. You will need some type of head porting. Volvo heads do respond well to porting, 8v heads to the short side radius, 16v heads by raising the roof and sharpening the division between runners. 8v people are going to have a harder time to get the same power. 8v people should really be thinking about larger valves, running the biggest you can fit in the stock head.

Most volvo people will convert to 16v heads long before this point due to their increased flow/power potential. Still, plan on porting.

Most people at this point should choose to run lower compression ratio. Anywhere from 8:1 to 9:1 being considered normal. There are different camps in this regard, some preferring to run even higher compression, but compensating with tuning.

Plan on running well over 25psi boost on a turbo designed to handle it.

Many people will take their engines that normally run 300whp and use nitrous to supplement power. A 75 to 125 shot of nitrous will take people from the mid 12's to the mid 11's. How well can you tune your nitrous and fuel injection and boost at the same time? Nitrous is unforgiving.

In a stock 240/740/940, this level of power is capable of mid 11 second ¼ mile times. Not that it’s not possible to go on, it just gets exponentially more difficult and more expensive. It's very hard to tune at this power level on the street because things happen so quickly. You're really looking at dyno time here.

MANDATORY UPGRADES FOR THIS POWER LEVEL.

ALL OF THE "300HP" MODIFICATIONS INCLUDING…
  1. FORGED PISTONS
  2. H-BEAM CONNECTING RODS
  3. AFTERMARKET ENGINE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM TUNED PROFESSIONALLY DON'T EVEN THINK OF USING CHIPS UNLESS YOU REALLY KNOW WHAT YOU ARE DOING
  4. HIGHER FLOWING INJECTORS think 75-100lb/hr for gas or 160/hr for e85
  5. POSSIBLY TUBULAR TURBO HEADER
  6. DYNO TUNING
  7. MOST DEFINITELY RACE GAS OR E85.
  8. UPGRADED TURBO. (T04e 50 trim, holset, gt30 and bigger)
  9. UPGRADED TRANSMSISION. T56, TKO 5-SPEED, OR BEEFED UP GM AUTOMATIC (TH350, TH400, 4L80E) WITH HIGH STALL SPEED CONVERTER
  10. UPGRADED REAR END (FORD 8.8, TOYOTA)
  11. NITROUS OXIDE
  12. ROLL CAGE FOR TIMES FASTER THAN 11 SECOND ¼ MILE.

Last edited by 740atl; 01-06-2013 at 07:35 AM..
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Old 01-03-2013, 05:57 PM   #11
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Default What modifications should i do to support over 400hp?

WHAT MODIFICATIONS SHOULD I DO TO SUPPORT OVER 400HP?
Now you’re dealing with stupid levels of power. You find quickly that in order to get there, you need to spin your little 4 cylinder Volvo to very high rpms to deal with the massive turbos you’re working with. These engines are very peaky and are no longer fun to drive on the street, not to mention being outright dangerous (for temptation’s sake, not that you can’t actually drive it.) You will need to run race gas, period. You will also find yourself requiring nitrous oxide… not only for the additional power, but to help spool the freakishly large turbo you have. Things happen stupid fast at this level of power. I have seen 2.3L Volvo engines in the 550hp range that run solid low-10 second quarter miles. The Swede’s run in the 9’s, 8’s, 7’s and now even the 6’s with upwards of 1000rwhp. Speed costs money. How fast do you want to go.

MANDATORY UPGRADES FOR THIS POWER LEVEL.
  1. ALL OF THE PREVIOUS UPGRADES INCLUDING…
  2. A SPONSOR
  3. A LARGE BANK ACCOUNT
  4. BEING FRIENDS WITH A DYNO SHOP OWNER
  5. A TRAILER
  6. NO INTERIOR
  7. DEFINITELY A FULL ROLL CAGE
  8. FIRE SUPPRESSION SYSTEM
  9. A WILL AND/OR MEDICAL PROXY

Last edited by 740atl; 01-06-2013 at 07:20 AM..
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Old 01-03-2013, 10:03 PM   #12
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Default Engine Swaps

There have been any number of alien engines installed into the 2/7/9 cars as the engine bays are adequate for most V8's. The later single/double overhead cam engines because of the much higher heads have many more clearance issues but they too have been shoe horned into our Volvo's. The most popular over the years have been the small block Fords and Chevy push rod engines. These engines and their associated transmissions are very available at reasonable, if not cheap, prices and the rebuild/upgrade parts are available almost anywhere. It is easy to install a Ford/Chevy engine that will quickly tear the very stout rear end out of these cars. Then there are rear end upgrades using, primarily the Ford equipment that will address that issue.

The following link will take you to my story of installing a Ford 302 V8 into an '82 245 Diesel wagon. Linked within that thread is an appendix with links to as many engine swap threads as I could find. If you find others of significant value please post then to that thread.

Here is the Small Block Ford Conversion Manual: Volvo's That Run

http://forums.turbobricks.com/showthread.php?t=250257


Last edited by TestPoint; 03-09-2013 at 07:20 PM..
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Old 01-05-2013, 10:13 PM   #13
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Default Has anyone swapped a GM automatic into a volvo?

EDIT>>> HAS ANYONE ELSE DONE THE GM AUTOMATIC SWAP? PLEASE PM ME WITH YOUR THREAD OR LINK TO PICTURES!!!

PRELIMINARY

The GM automatic will fit behind the reblock engine. Several turbobricks have accomplished this feat with the th350, th400, 200-4r. The 4l60e will fit but as with the others will require a bit of transmission tunnel massaging due to the large servo housing.

There are two methods to physically mount the transmission to the redblock engine.

The first being to cut the bellhousing from the GM v8 and weld on the front half of the redblock bellhousing. This will require a fair bit of alignment and welding to accomplish the task.



The picture above is from the Swedish performance forum Savarturbo.se http://forum.savarturbo.se/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=24192 which shows several other methods of mating the transmission.

The second, and probably more common method will be to use an adapter that fits between the reblock engine and GM auto bellhousing. Gsellstr sells these adapters on Turbobricks, and the Swedish company KLracing.se also sells them.


The adapter allows the engine and transmission to be easily mated. However, because the transmission is essentially pushed further away from the engine, a second adapter must be used between the factory volvo flexplate and the GM automatic torque converter. Such an adapter is (and may still be) available from qwkswede.



The torque converter would be up to your choosing, although something in the 2800rpm and greater stall speed range would be recommended. These are available from many retailers, but popular brands include Revmax, available on Ebay.

You will need to have a custom driveshaft made, or more likely, an existing GM driveshaft shortened.

The dana-spicer rear axle flange model 2-2-329 will mate the GM driveshaft to the volvo rear end. This model uses the common dana 1310 U-joint.


LINKS TO GM AUTOMATIC SWAPS.

linuxman51 http://forums.turbobricks.com/showthread.php?t=205556
thelostartof http://forums.turbobricks.com/showthread.php?t=265427
qwkswede http://www.turbobricks.com/forums/sh...=97657&page=19

Last edited by 740atl; 01-08-2013 at 10:34 AM..
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Old 01-06-2013, 10:01 PM   #14
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Default what is the best Volvo transmission to use for performance?

what is the best Volvo transmission to use for performance??

The only bolt-on Volvo transmissions available to the turbobricker are the m46, m47, zf22, aw70, aw71, aw71L, and aw72L. The european redblock M90 is very robust but is cost prohibitive due to the cost in getting it to the US.

The M46 and M47 manual transmissions are not known for being robust. People during normal driving with non-turbo 240/740/940's have shattered the m46/m47. It is simply not a performance transmission. People have gotten lucky and drag raced this transmission with power levels over 300hp, but they simply do not last long.

Turbobricks are limited in their choices of automatic transmissions. The aw70, aw71, and zf22 are all that the 4-cylinder redblocker has to choose for a bolt-on affair.

Ideally, the strongest Volvo automatic transmission would be the aw30-40le found on the 960. This is the same transmission found in the Toyota Supra. Unfortunately, some kind of adapter plate would be required to bolt the transmission to the redblock bellhousing. As of yet, most people who have come this far decide to go with one of the GM automatic options.

The zf22 is a finicky transmission known to have several weaknesses. At this point in time, serious upgrades have not been explored.

The aw71 is the choice for the budget conscious turbobricker. It is all-around bigger in terms of components next to it's baby cousin, the aw70. The aw71 can be identified by the ID plate on the driver's side of the transmission. The aw71, aw71L and aw72L (16v) automatics can be bolted directly in place of the weaker cousin, the aw70. You must use the aw71/71L/72L torque converter as well.

Most people who start out a turbo project with a 240 or 740 will start with the aw70, and quickly find that their new-found power has dramatically shortened the life of the transmission. Generally, 240/740 turbo cars came with the aw71.

Improving the aw71 for performance.

Even the aw71, while beefier, still has its limitations and will quickly die under the influence of additional power unless some relatively easy modifications are performed.

The "accumulator mod" performed to the aw71 will allow it to survive to power levels far past any of the volvo manual transmissions with the exception of the European M90. People have taken the aw71 to the 300rwhp level and beyond, to 11 second and 10 second quarter miles. Lifespan between rebuilds diminishes dramatically as power levels exceed 300rwhp.

Link to the accumulator mod http://forums.turbobricks.com/showthread.php?t=108965

Youtube video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BtkT5exNsPw

There is a second modification to the aw71 called the "valve body mod" outlined here. http://brickspeed.net/forum/showthre...27500#pid27500

The AW71L is found on 94-later 940's and has the added benefit of the lock-up torque converter, which can provide the additional mpg benefit.


Stall speeds.

The stall speeds found on volvo automatics ranged between 2100-2700rpm. To date, no one has found a pattern to know what stall speed is present in the converter they have. Most transmissions however seem to come with the lower stall speed 2100-2200rpm stall speed.

Factory 16valve aw72L transmissions are known to come with the 2500rpm stall speed. The aw72L converter can be used in aw71L transmissions.

Stall speed is very important when determining the launch of a car at the drag strip. Most aw71 vehicles equipped with the lower stall speed torque converters will obtain a 60-foot time in the 2.0 to 1.9 second range. If you are considering an aw71 for your performance car, consider having the stall speed of your existing converter "uprated". Shops such as Precision of New Hampshire can increase the stall speed of your existing converter up to 600-700rpm over stock for about $400.

Last edited by 740atl; 01-06-2013 at 11:31 PM..
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Old 01-07-2013, 12:07 AM   #15
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Default How much does it cost to upgrade to a T5/getrag/w58/r154/t56 transmission?

Turbobricks have been swapping other transmissions behind their redblocks for some time now. Most people perform a transmission swap because they realize that they're stock m46/m47/aw70/aw71 broke under the influence of 50-100 more horsepower than the factory designed them for.

The sky is the limit in terms of what manual transmission you want to swap behind your redblock. Where there's a will, there's an adapter plate.

COST OF SWAP.
For any transmission swap, plan on the cost being around 1000 dollars. A quick breakdown is below, and as you can see, the cost can vary wildly depending on your choice of transmission and components, whether you use used or new transmissions, buy parts from the recycling yard or ebay, etc.

  • cost of transmission, used, 75-500 (800-1200 for t56)
  • adapter plate, $250 (More for the w58/r154 cast bellhousings)
  • clutch kit, $250-500 (depending on strength of clutch and exotic materials in clutch disk)
  • flywheel machining $100-200
  • aftermarket steel flywheel, $300-500 (Not necessary, but recommended for high power applications).
  • driveshaft modification $150-500 (depending on custom, or modification)
ADAPTING THE TRANSMISSION.
Most transmission swaps entail the use of an unmodified transmission of your choice, followed by an adapter plate, anywhere from 1/2 inch to 1 inches thick that goes between the transmission and volvo bellhousing. The toyota w58 and r154 transmissions have the alternative of using a cast bellhousing available from an Australian company that bolts directly to the transmission and then to the volvo block. The w58 and r154 swaps are not as prevalent in the US due to the cost of adapter plates and availability of these transmissions compared to the T5.

Getrag adapters

The Getrag 265 is a very strong transmission found behind the 81-82, and 85 BMW 5-series, and some early BMW M3's. The transmission is easily adapted. The gear ratios do leave a bit to be desired compared to the v8 T5. It's a popular swap if you can find one as they are getting harder to find every day.
Ford T5 adapters

The ford V8 T5's have the best gear ratios for redblocks. Look for the 2.95 1st gear ratio to find the strongest transission. Check here to find out what ID number you need.
GM T5 adapters

The GM V8 T5's have the best gear ratios for redblocks. Look for the 2.95 1st gear ratio to find the strongest transission. Check here to find out what ID number you need.
JVAB machines the bellhousing and adds a welded on-adapter to mate the popular, plentiful, GM v8 T5 to your redblock. Give John a call for details.



W58 adapter

W58's were found behind early 90's supras and have decent gear ratios. Adapter bellhousings are available through Dellow Automotive, but are pricey. ($500-600).
CLUTCH AND FLYWHEEL CONSIDERATIONS
In addition to the adapter plate, generally an upgraded clutch will be required, with a clutch disk having matching splines to the swapped transmissions.

Volvo offers two flywheels to choose from, the "flat" flywheel with bolt pattern for an 8.5" (215mm) clutch disk, or the "stepped or dished" flywheel with bolt pattern for 9" (225mm) clutch disk. The stepped flywheel is very heavy at around 30 pounds, whereas the flat flywheel comes in at around 20 pounds.

Over the recent years as turbobricks have elevated their power levels, it has been discovered that the stepped flywheels do not offer adequate strength and in several instances, have "grenaded" during "aggressive" driving, in several cases, destroying the engine and car in the process. As it is a cast iron flywheel, for serious high performance use, the "stepped" flywheel should not be considered, and rather a steel aftermarket flywheel should be sought out.

Many others have had difficulty obtaining a good clutch sealing surface with the stepped flywheel. The key in obtaining good performance is to have both flywheel surfaces accurately machined and the pressure plate to clutch disk thicknesses taken into account.

The flat flywheel is much lighter and many have had good success with them with the smaller 8.5" clutch disk. In any event, any serious performance car should look towards a steel performance flywheel.

DRIVESHAFT MODIFICATIONS
Rounding out the transmission swap is a custom driveshaft. For many of the cases, a stock driveshaft need only be shortened. In the case of the getrag swap, the stock volvo two-piece driveshaft may be used, but must be lengthened by 1.5 inches.

TRANSMISSION CHOICE
The transmission of choice is generally related to the user's budget and availability. The T5 seems to be the most available transmission across the US. Some areas of the country have more availability of the getrag, others not so much.

In terms of strength, the transmissions are roughly equivalent, but the top of the list should include the t56, r154, getrag, with the T5 and w58 rounding out the field. The T5 and w58 are good to the 300hp level and beyond depending on how it is driven.

The most common transmissions swapped into volvos are as follows.
  1. The FORD T-5
  2. The BMW GETRAG 265
  3. The Toyota Supra W58
  4. The VOLVO redblock M90
  5. The 6-speed T56
  6. The toyota R154

FORD T-5

The Ford T5 is the most popular manual transmission swap due to is availability, and low cost of parts. The World-Class T5 is preferred due to its stronger internals. V8 T-5's are preferred due to their lower numerical gear ratio (2.95 or 3.35 1st gear) and stronger gear clusters. The GM T5 is generally not used because the input shaft is shorter than required for use behind a volvo engine. Only the later model GM v6 transmission has the longer input shaft which would make it useable by turbobricks. However, the v6 t5's have the weaker gearsets.

An adapter plate must be used between the volvo bellhousing and T5 transmission. Several companies sell such an adapter, generally available for around $250.

Generally T5 swappers have a custom 1-piece driveshaft made.

links to builds...

GETRAG 265

The getrag 265 is a very strong transmission found in 80-81 and 85 5-series bmw's and the 635 series. The getrag 265 case may be stamped with 262, but it most likely is the 5-speed overdrive transmission. Only the 5-speeds found in the 6-series cars may be the actual getrag 262 with the close-ration non-overdrive transmission.

Getrag availability across the country in wrecking yards is hit or miss, with more seeming to be found on the west coast and near major metropolitan areas. The getrag swap is fairly simple requiring only an adapter plate (also including a centering ring), with driveshaft lengthening. Next to the T5, it is the most widely swapped transmission into a volvo. Getrags seem to perform well even when well-worn (slop in the input shaft). While expensive to rebuild, if you can find them, they will take quite a bit of abuse.

links to builds....

Last edited by 740atl; 02-05-2013 at 04:59 PM..
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Old 01-07-2013, 06:30 PM   #16
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Default Can I improve the performance of my car without turbocharging?

PRE-EDIT... I'm soliciting for more direct links to this thread. Does anyone know of any VERY pertinent links for basic NA performance, please PM me! Also, I'm looking for actual NA dyno numbers! If you can think of any other upgrades the basic NA turbobricker could make use of, please let me know!


Can I improve the performance of my car without turbocharging?

Absolutely. While the +T swap is by far the best bang for the buck in terms of raising horsepower, there are a number of things the average turbobricker can do that doesn't have a turbocharged brick!

REALITY CHECK! Keep in mind, the 2.3L volvo engine (most likely you have the 85-later B230F engine) enters the playing field at about 110 horsepower. Most good condition NA engines will pull about 85-90 rear wheel horsepower when on a chassis dynamometer. You know yourself, that's not a lot, but it can be improved. .You are NOT going to be able to get 180 or even 200 horsepower out of ANY low-budget modifications Think closer to perhaps an upper limit of 140 rear wheel horsepower. 140 rear wheel horsepower may not seem like a lot, but a 40-horsepower bump over stock will EASILY be felt at the seat of your pants.

The name of the game when it comes to NA performance is airflow. There are several ways to accomplish this.

1. camshaft. NA engines usually come with the M cam from the factory. Those who drive their redblocks spiritedly, know that the M cam soon runs out of gas. There are a number of factory cam alternatives to be considered in this order... the T, B, A, then those seeking maximum NA performance with a "stock" cam should look to the K. See the cam faq here for more information.

Aftermarket camshafts include the popular varieties from IPD including the VX cam.

RSI also sells a powerful NA cam.

Keep in mind if you drive an automatic volvo, it is simply not going to like the K cam. The lack of low end torque will make you want to reconsider your decision... unless of course you also use an adjustable cam gear and run the K 6 degrees advanced.

2. Electric fan. The stock mechanical fan works very well, but for those looking for every inch of performance will want to lose the drag on the engine by eliminating the factory fan and going to an electric fan. See electric fan swaps here.

3. Aftermarket headers. Stahl and others make a bolt-on aftermarket header for the redblock. Don't expect huge horsepower increases here. Many have done well with the stock exhaust system. They' ain't cheap.

4. Exhaust size upgrades. Consider a 2.5" exhaust as the upper limit. Keep in mind that NA cars are LOUD.

5. Porting. Studies have shown that the factory 8v head to be very good, but intake flow seems to stagnate early. To take the full benefit of additional lift from something like a K cam, consider porting the 8v head. Porting is really a bad term to use here as many people assume that by porting the head you will be "hogging out" the ports for maximum benefit... this is hardly the case. The porting mods you perform could be accomplished in an afternoon with widely available tools. Consider this link by StealthFTI to be your first stop when it comes to porting the 8v head.

Look here for real world porting data on the 8v head and what you can expect to obtain by linuxman51.


6. LARGER INTAKE/EXHAUST VALVES. Increasing on the cost-to-benefit scale is the use of larger intake and exhaust valves. Several Turbobrick friendly companies offer the larger valves, springs, retainers and locks for the NA-friendly turbobricker.

Here's real world porting flow data on the 48mm intake/40mm exhaust valve upgrade on a ported 8v 530 head.

6.5. The 405/531 "penta" 8v cylinder head swap. Many 8v "penta" engines came with a higher flowing factory cylinder head which looks identical to the stock 8v cylinder head. The so-called "penta" head can be a decent jump in power over the factory head. The part numbers to look for are 405 and 531. 531 cylinder heads were commonly available on European cars, but not American. Canadian cars did come with the nearly identical 405 cylinder heads.

6.7. TIGHT SQUISH!. Simplified, to obtain "tight squish" you need to bring the pistons closer to the cylinder head. Only two ways to do this, mill the deck of the block or buy a thinner headgasket. In a nutshell, the tighter the "squish", the more turbulent the fuel-air mixture, the decreased chances for detonation. This allows you to run more ignition advance, and a bit more compression ratio. If you're thinking of porting a head, you're going to be removing the head and replacing the headgasket anyway... why not get some tight squish?

tight squish links.
the man, http://www.pbase.com/stealthfti/b230ftshortblock
http://forums.turbobricks.com/showth...=123665&page=2


7. Aftermarket Fuel injection. The stock NA ecu does a good job, but anyone who knows automotive performance knows that out of the three terms, economy/emissions/performance, performance was the low end of the totem pole. An aftermarket fuel injection system can allow you to tailor the air fuel ratios of your engine, in addition to tuning the ignition advance to get maximum power.

8. Nitrous oxide. Don't be surprised! Your volvo engine is pretty hardy! A 50-75 "wet shot" of nitrous oxide can be an eye-opening experience. Serious users apply only.

10. The b21F intake manifold swap. The b21F intake manifold was available on 1976-1982 (?) 240's. While the manifold will bolt on to the 8v head, that's not all you'll have to do. Aluminum injector bungs must be welded into the manifold itself as this manifold never had them from the factory. The bungs and welding are not terribly expensive, but there are very good examples of other people who have done this and lived to tell the tale. Apparently, the b21F manifold swap is worth a solid 10hp over the b23/b230 intake manifold.

Check here for more information.
http://forums.turbobricks.com/showthread.php?t=270659
http://forums.turbobricks.com/showpo...0&postcount=14

10. A 16valve head conversion. Believe it or not, the volvo b234f "16valve" cylinder head bolts right on in place of your 8v head. If this makes you squeamish, that's ok. But for ultimate NA performance without breaking the bank, this should be considered. A basic 16valve head will pull 140 rear wheel horsepower on a dyno right out of the gate. With tuning, the number could inch higher.

See the following for 16valve conversion links.
NA 16v power. "low compression pistons" http://forums.turbobricks.com/showthread.php?t=48301

11. Manual vs. Automatic transmission. Let's face it... sometimes feeling like you're faster is better than being faster... this can be the case with a manual transmission vs an automatic. This is especially the case with trying to make power for cheap with an NA volvo. If you are serious about making power, you need more airflow, which means you need more cam, which means you lose low end power. Having a manual transmission will allow you to use that power as well as just being more sporty to drive.

If you must stay with an automatic, consider getting a higher stall speed torque converter. Unfortunately, even though volvo made a range of stall speeds between 2100-2700, no one really knows how to tell them apart. It is known that the 16v volvo came with a 2500 rpm stall speed, but to use that converter, you either need to have the aw71L or aw72L transmission. Most 240 owners will have the aw70 transmission, which is not compatible.

Aftermarket torque converters with higher stall speeds can be purchased for around $400. It could make the difference for you.


NA PERFORMANCE LINKS.
http://forums.turbobricks.com/showthread.php?t=150954
http://forums.turbobricks.com/showthread.php?t=248416
very good and recent link with actual NA dyno figures. http://forums.turbobricks.com/showth...=272196&page=7

Last edited by 740atl; 01-16-2013 at 03:55 PM..
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Old 01-08-2013, 08:28 AM   #18
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Default Does anyone make H-beam connecting rods or forged pistons for my volvo?

Yes, there are several suppliers of H-beam connecting rods and forged pistons.

1. RSI RODS http://yhst-26451710505916.stores.ya...roforb215.html PISTONS http://yhst-26451710505916.stores.ya...2andb2wap.html
2. JVL Imports http://www.rallyrace.net/jvab/
3. Sten Parner Motors. RODS http://www.stenparnermotor.se/default.aspx?NodeId=43 PISTONS http://www.stenparnermotor.se/default.aspx?NodeId=42
4. Ebay. Caveat Emptor. http://forums.turbobricks.com/showthread.php?t=266354
5. Motor Nord. http://www.motornord.se/system/websh...=256&HSID=3054


Figure around $400 for H-beams with arp rod bolts... which is a pretty darned good deal.

Figure around $600 or more for forged pistons.

Let's face it. You're looking at this thread because you know that even the "strong" 13mm rods will bend at will upon any serious detonation. You may be here because this has already happened to you. You don't have to crush your car! Aftermarket rods are plentiful and cheap.

The rods listed above will survive to 600hp and beyond...

Most of the domestic connecting rod companies (pauter, carillo, scat, manley, eagle) will make forged rods for you, but for a premium.


Quote:
Originally Posted by John V, outside agitator View Post
Aside from Carrillo and Pauter, virtually all the othe rbrands are made at one of the 2 big factories in Chengdu, Szechuan province in Western China... Same plant as SPE, RSI, JVAB so the difference becomes design features: Are the B200/B230 rods piston steered or full width, is the pin bush size ciorrectly of will it need a resize because somebody said "Make the pin 23mm, and didn't give the required clearence-- 2 of those brands are exactly pin size---not good on a floating pin that wants .0006-.0008" clearnence...
Are the rod bolts at leaset as large as original?

The ebay link places DOES have the same rods as everybody offers, at least they have a LISTING.....but read every dimension as they list everything as "B230"....possible a good reason to talk with, and buy from somebody who actually can spit out instantly what the various rod dimensions are....

Last edited by 740atl; 01-20-2013 at 11:42 AM..
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Old 01-08-2013, 09:20 PM   #19
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Default What's the best redblock turbo that's not a bolt-on?

What's the best redblock turbo that's not a bolt-on?

That would have to be the twin-scroll Mitsubishi 16g6, found on the EVO 8 and up.

If you've ever seen a turbocharger you know it looks nothing like what a turbocharger should... looks like it was designed by a committee.



Because this turbo is so odd, you have two choices for how to mount it to your engine.

1. Build a tubular header and either mount the header up top or down below. Harder said than done due to the extremely odd input flange configuration as seen below.


Bottom mount


2. Build a J-pipe adapter to the stock, NA exhaust manifold with a top mount. Easier than #1 with the same results.


You of course will have to make some kind of exhaust outlet as shown in the images below.


The stock evo 8 outlet will fit with some modifications. The ebay version is shown here.


The compressor map for this turbo is out of this world. Spool is insane. Full boost (15psi) obtained by minimum 2500rpm.

30psi map shown below. Room to grow.


A second interesting option with less fabrication would the EVO 3 16g (small 16g?)

Compressor map is not as sweet as the 16g6, but would require FAR less fabrication.

EVO 3 16g


Using this adapter, the EVO 3 16g could be bolted to a milled flat 90+ exhaust manifold. With some reclocking, this could be a killer street turbo with relatively little fabrication.


Small 16g compressor map at 30psi.

Last edited by 740atl; 01-11-2013 at 04:36 PM..
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Old 01-12-2013, 06:38 AM   #20
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Default I can't afford to build an engine. What's the strongest volvo engine?

I can't afford to build an engine. What's the strongest volvo engine?

by linuxman51

What's the goal? The early turbo motors (b21ft, b23ft) as well as the 90+ b230ft's are considered the 'strongest' but this is a relative term in that any of these can succumb to poor tuning, attention to detail, modification choices and execution of the build. If careful attention is given, any of these should (theoretically) hold 3-400hp, or more, depending on several factors. In most cases, keeping things at or under 300hp is 'safe' here stateside. Other things that can prolong engine life: put off the pleasure. Many people will frown at this suggestion for a variety of reasons, but part of the key to success for the swedes is in effect this. build the setup to make peak boost (and as a result power) much higher in the powerband than stock.. i.e. a large turbo that doesn't really hit hard until 4500, with a cam(s) and spring/retainer package that will allow it to turn on out to 7500 or so. The reasoning for this is relatively simple, things happen faster-the pistons are moving faster, knock has less time to exact forces on the pistons and rods, tuning changes will have a slightly 'duller' effect (which makes it easier to creep up to the desired power/tune state) as well. This type of setup is generally better suited to a car with a manual transmission, however, and a number of people find it tedious/counter productive/etc since it doesn't have the 'fun' factor that comes with instant torque from small turbo setups that peak early and fall off early. The path you choose here will dictate what you need to spend money on elsewhere on the car. For the common 15g crowd, a moderate set of injectors, relatively common chips, exhaust, mbc, and win. Going for large numbers on a budget...well... comes with it's own considerations and requirements, and to a certain extent not really a budget setup (in the grand scheme of things)


I can't afford to build an engine. What's the strongest volvo engine?

The contents of this article are taken from SAVARTURBO.SE, originally authored by Jens Gustavsson, also a member on Turbobricks.

You can view the article here. http://savarturbo.se/?sida=content/a...ndelen&sidnr=1

The article has been translated by Google Translate, so there are a few words in Swedish that do not translate well such as...

STAKE = connecting rod
NAILS = detonation
SPIKES = detonation

T
  • he 85-89 crankshafts he refers too are those with the center thrust bearing and are weaker cranks.
  • Also in 85-89, volvo departed from reason and went with "thinner" connecting rods. These were 9mm thick.
  • After 89, they regained reason and went back to the 13mm thick rod.
  • However, even the later 13mm b230 rod pales in comparison to the 13mm thick M-rod as described below.

Quote:
The base :: ::

The turbo engine world is alive and well myths and falsehoods, so I thought I would write a few pages about what I and my friends have learned over the years we have been involved in various turbo installations. Already at an early stage, many years ago, we began to suspect that the so-called turbo experts at firms that GIK turbo, Unitec mm did not know much about turbo tuning. They were more eager to sell expensive useless special stuff and throw **** at each other. We began instead to read and experiment themselves, and because we are quite a few we have not had to commit all the mistakes themselves, but instead learned from each other. Remember that what I write now is advice and tips about the Volvo turbo tuning and complete information on the subject trimming & motor preparation see books as A. Graham Bell / Four Stroke Performance (ISBN: 1859604358) and David Vizard "How To Build .."-books, and also workshop manuals (games and moments).

Rods

The connecting rods of the Volvo engines are generally very stable and usually manage everything. Some exceptions are B20/B21-stakarna that existed between about 1975-82 that are very similar M-stakes, but without the M-brand. These stakes are soft as lead! Another stakes you should watch out for is the B230 model from 1985-89 that is too narrow. A fence we have good experience with the M model, which usually sat on the B23A engine. These stakes are very heavy about 930G but none of us have managed to run down someone in spite of laps at over 10,000 rpm. There is a Ford T23 with 16V running Altered class running mid 7's now, and they are using M-stakes up to 700 hp without running down any.

For durability the preppas as follows: First, check the straightness, then change the bolts and nuts of the new Volvo org. Weight Balancing should also be made, weight is removed the humps at large and small end. NOTE! Never remove more than about 12g of the weakening stake. Avoid other preparation as lift-off, blasting etc. on this type of fence, the weakened only. Check now only the bearing caps so that no handling damage has occurred. Poles that have been prepared as follows dare I almost cold blast safe as long as they are not exposed to violent detonation or alternated continuously over about 8200rpm. The lighter B18 Bofors stakes can also be used in B20-B23 intake and turbo engines with little lower cylinder pressure on the prepared like M-stakes, however, have 6-bolt crankshaft used. B20 6-bolt-stakes and 1989 or newer B230-stakes is also good stakes.

Crankshafts

Volvo crankshafts, 1961 (B18) to 1998 (B230) are all good, with one exception, 1985-89 built the so-called "lågfriktionsmotorn" with less frame layer, it can go off, I myself have seen it on a Volvo Original Cup 240th With a little determination, most cranks moved between engine families. A Volvo axle should not renovated, it is better to use a orenoverad fine crank that you measure up with a micrometer on the crank pins and main bearings. Straightness checked at the test assembly in the block with new bearings and torqued main bearing, the crank spins easily, it is easy, do not forget to check axiallagerspelet. Ball Anse Call of unprocessed parts of the bottom part is wasted money, genuine Volvo-balancing will do.

Block

When we are preparing an engine block for a turbo Volvo drilled it as little as possible and preferably with stress plate mounted for maximum durability and minimal leak-down. An exception is the 1975-year B20 block with M12 bolt to the box and the newer B21 block can be bored to 92mm and 94mm. A good trick to help keep the toppacknigen on B18-B20 is that thread about the M12-bultar/pinnbultar of 12.9 or better quality, then the torque is increased to 110-120 Nm. A top decking is also needed to maintain toppackningen and to receive a clamping gap of 0.8-1.1 mm.

O-ring is not something that we have needed so far, but my new B20 will oringad preventive measure reaches the boost pressure is increased above 1.6bar. I sizzles down a track in the block where I put down a 1.0 mm piano wire sticking up max about 0.2 mm above the block.

Concrete filling should be avoided as long as the engine block is, we've never tried seriously because we have not had problems with the engine block. But the extreme cylinder pressures it may be necessary to use a product including Summit Racing sells, it's called "Hard Block" and have the same thermal expansion value as cast iron. It is also possible to use fiber reinforced screed for underfloor heating systems, the running example Magnus Söderlund with its B23: a

Pistons

The pistons are usually what may take the hardest knocks in a turbo engine, they are usually also the most expensive component in the bottom part. At higher cylinder pressures should be used forged pistons, but I'm not saying it's impossible to use the original cast pistons at lower boost pressure of nailing free engines. The semi-forged 240 turbo pistons usually works pretty well even at higher cylinder pressures, but they do not tolerate violent detonation long moments, unfortunately they seem to be getting hard to come by. The forged pistons B23ET-being good and doing well to get in.

In my new B20 should I start using forged Mahle pistons VW, these are both cheap, easy and stable pistons that are well proven in various BMW turbo cars here around Umeå. The disadvantages, however, 22mm piston pin, height because the block must peak decked about 3-5 mm (depending on compression) and water pump usually has to be moved down. Also remember that the arrow is pointing back at Volvo / BMW engine.

Other

Oil system is not something that you need to modify in any way except for copious tire into use then a baffle plate construction (I'll get a picture).

Summary

Summing we bit so many people think that we build snikiga bottoms. But we always have a limited budget to work with and we rather spend my money on things that give power peaks, cams, manifolds, turbochargers, and most important: tuning, than on the things that are already working. Now I'll even stick your neck out even further and say that the above mentioned things like cams, turbos, etc. as an individual and together affect the durability more than the connecting rods have! I hope this little Volvo turbo bottom hand's thesis has lived an interesting read and if interested, I can write more then for example combs, Wastegate system etc..

Have questions or want to say something about what I have written so do it on the forum.

/ Jens Gustavsson
Pictures of 9mm rods vs 13mm rods. The rods shown are from a b230 engine, the 9mm rods being from the 85-89 years.

Last edited by 740atl; 01-19-2013 at 10:05 AM..
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Old 01-12-2013, 12:42 PM   #21
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At work we call that Swenglish. Very good article so far.
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If you want to do it right the first time why the hell you on Turbobricks?

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But please, ask me again if I even race bro.
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Try peeing on your feet - it is what everyone suggest when I had issues with mine and it seemed to go away after a few months of peeing on my feet =)

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Old 01-14-2013, 10:23 AM   #22
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Default Does anyone make high tech suspension components for a volvo?

Does anyone make high tech suspension components for a volvo?

Yes!

JVAB Imports JVL sells hardcore suspension products for everything from road track cars to rally racing. Take a look at his webpage, or better yet, give him a call.

http://www.rallyrace.net/jvab/

Kaplhenke Racing. Supplies everything from soup to nuts. Hardcore complete racing suspension components such as control arms, camber plates to coilovers for the Volvo 240/740/940/960 and even the FWD 850/S70 series.

http://www.kaplhenke.com/

RSI Supplies a large range of aftermaket volvo products. Suspension components include primarily coilover kits and shocks/struts.

http://yhst-26451710505916.stores.ya...uspension.html

Who can forget IPD. IPD still sells lowering springs, adjustable torque rods and panhard rods, and what they're really famous for, beefier swaybars. All prices are quite reasonable.

http://www.ipdusa.com/

YOSHIFAB Yoshifab is a company run by a turbobricker. In addition to suspension parts such as adjustable torque rods and hard to find suspension pieces like strut tower plates, control arm and trailing arm plates all the way through to 16v conversion kits.

http://yoshifab.com/store/index.php?_a=viewCat&catId=4

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Old 01-15-2013, 06:26 PM   #23
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Quote:
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CAN I BLOW UP MY MOTOR BY BEING STUPID?

Absolutely. Volvo engines are tough, are well built, but will not tolerate idiots. Are you an idiot?

You might be an idiot if…
• you increase the boost on a 20 year old engine without monitoring the air fuel ratio.
• By increasing the boost on an engine that is overheating or has overheated in the past.
• You ignore the marbles in a coffee can sounds coming from your engine and continue to press on the gas pedal
• Are too cheap to run premium fuel
• You are under 20 years of age and know everything because your Honda buddy told you it’s ok.
• You are simply not mechanically inclined and the idea of changing your transmission makes you ill.


LINKS FOR MORE INFORMATION>>>>
http://forums.turbobricks.com/showthread.php?t=191830
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Old 01-15-2013, 07:29 PM   #24
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Yes, there are several suppliers of H-beam connecting rods.

1. RSI http://yhst-26451710505916.stores.ya...roforb215.html
2. JVL Imports http://www.rallyrace.net/jvab/
3. Sten Parner Motors. http://www.stenparnermotor.se/default.aspx?NodeId=43
4. Ebay. Caveat Emptor. http://forums.turbobricks.com/showthread.php?t=266354


Figure around $400 for H-beams with arp rod bolts... which is a pretty darned good deal.

Let's face it. You're looking at this thread because you know that even the "strong" 13mm rods will bend at will upon any serious detonation. You may be here because this has already happened to you. You don't have to crush your car! Aftermarket rods are plentiful and cheap.

The rods listed above will survive to 600hp and beyond...

Most of the domestic connecting rod companies (pauter, carillo, scat, manley, eagle) will make forged rods for you, but for a premium.
Aside from Carrillo and Pauter, virtually all the othe rbrands are made at one of the 2 big factories in Chengdu, Szechuan province in Western China... Same plant as SPE, RSI, JVAB so the difference becomes design features: Are the B200/B230 rods piston steered or full width, is the pin bush size ciorrectly of will it need a resize because somebody said "Make the pin 23mm, and didn't give the required clearence-- 2 of those brands are exactly pin size---not good on a floating pin that wants .0006-.0008" clearnence...
Are the rod bolts at leaset as large as original?

The ebay link places DOES have the same rods as everybody offers, at least they have a LISTING.....but read every dimension as they list everything as "B230"....possible a good reason to talk with, and buy from somebody who actually can spit out instantly what the various rod dimensions are....
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Old 01-15-2013, 11:03 PM   #25
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I'm grabbing this part because.. well, I can, damnit.
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EXHAUST PERFORMANCE

which is best? 2.5" or 3" exhaust for a turbo?
has anyone built a custom turbo header?


FUEL INJECTION PERFORMANCE AND CHIPS

What are performance chips?
Are there any limitations to chips?
Does anyone make a chip for lh2.2 or lh2.4?
Can I modify LH2.2 or LH2.4 myself?
Do they make a piggyback computer for my car?
Is there an aftermarket fuel injection computer that will work with my volvo?
What the heck is megasquirt? Can I really tune it myself?
Oh crap, I don't know how to install my megasquirt
What fuel injection system does my car have?


CHEAPASS PERFORMANCE... AKA JUNKYARD RACERS

I can't afford to build an engine. What's the strongest volvo engine?
What's the cheapest way to go fast?
best bang for the buck used injectors and worst used injectors
can I weld my own exhaust?
Exhaust performance

2.5 vs 3.0

The subject of 'what size is best for me' could be best summed up in approximately 15 leather bound volumes next to your useless set of encyclopedia britannica, where you could largely disregard it as you do the other volumes collecting dust up there. The bottom line here is that: There is almost no exhaust that is 'too big' on a turbo app. Diminishing returns? Sure. Too small? Absolutely. So clearly, some consideration must be expended here. The short of it is, what are your intended goals? You might be able to do everything you want with a nice 2.5in system, and certainly there's nothing wrong with this approach; however, since the scope of this particular piece seems to be the ever-present argument of which is better, 2.5 or 3- I will say you are always better off with a nice 3 inch system. Your price difference is largely negligible, there is a higher 'upper end' for a 3 inch system, it's not much more difficult to roll than a 2.5, and if you put even 10 minutes of thought into the whole thing, the only part you'll need to address through the evolution of the car will be the down pipe.

How can I say this with such certainty? I've been through almost all of the permutations, first of all, and additionally, my 600+whp drag car doesn't seem to suffer much performance loss between the 4 inch up pipe and the 3 inch full exhaust. Since cost is almost always a factor, unless you have a compelling reason to go with 2.5 (i.e. has to have a carb exemption number or something of the ilk), you will not suffer a significant cost uptick for 3in, and again the upside is so much better as you move forward with your build.

As far as suggestions, those will vary as much as anything else, generally it is recommended that you procure mandrel bend stuff to cut down on downstream flow impediments, this will bump the cost up somewhat; and depending on how loud or quiet you want the system to be will dictate how many and what type of mufflers you run. Generally, straight through mufflers perform the best, and are the loudest.. resonators will help. The idea here is to cut down on back pressure as much as reasonably possible, so generally chambered mufflers are not suggested unless you're ok with the potential downside there (and this can't be easily discerned without field testing beyond the obvious: your upside will be lower with a chambered muffler vs unchambered).

Cost: this will depend on a) how much work you plan to do on your own b) local markets to some extent (labor) c) your ability to shop things out. As with most things in life, if you plan to outsource a custom exhaust system, you should visit several exhaust shops and see what they offer/turn around time/price/etc. You need to be very specific about how you want the system built, otherwise they will probably build it whatever way is cheapest and easiest for them, and you'll end up with a system that will be a pain in your ass in the future. Think about how you'd take it off the car if need be, or if you upgrade turbos and manifolds later (or if you put say a 2jz in the car), and specify these things. It will cost extra, but this expense up front makes life a lot easier down the road. At a minimum I would suggest you need to have the downpipe end shortly after it turns backwards, and if you are going over the axle with the exhaust system consider putting a v-band/flange either right before or right after the over the axle piece. (if you are going under the axle, this is less of a concern). You should have a flex section installed somewhere either on the downpipe or shortly after it, and you should have the downpipe itself braced to the block as the factory does. Failure to do so can and will reduce custom header life as well as downpipe life. Think about the stuff that moves around, and then think about the amount of leverage that can be obtained on a section of pipe 15 feet long.


Custom built header, has anyone done this?

Well the short answer is yes. The long answer is to what end? What's the power goal? NA? Turbo? These all have different considerations (Although some might argue otherwise to a certain extent). NA has it's own considerations and several aftermarket companies offer variations on the same ideas for reasonable monies, however this should not dissuade anyone from trying to roll their own. Turbo headers require a little more consideration... generally thicker wall (although not always), more purpose-built, things of that nature. This is not exactly a beginner topic, nor is it a requirement for good power production.. 400+hp has been made on more than one occasion with factory turbo manifolds, and people have made good NA hp with the oem cast manifolds as well. Really, if you're asking this question early on in your tuning career, you're probably barking up the wrong tree. A poorly executed custom header can and will cause more problems than it's worth, in terms of reliability (warped flanges, welds cracking, poor design or execution), fitment (hits the frame rail or strut tower, requires hood modifications, etc), and in some cases, emissions compliance as well. If you're not comfortable with the requirements to produce such a thing and maintain it, you would be well advised to seek the council of others (companies and individuals) who can/have/do produce these things, and it would also be a good idea to know exactly where you are going with it before you get started, otherwise the potential is high that you'll build one thing, it won't fit the next iteration of the car, and you'll have to build a new one, etc etc.


FUEL INJECTION PERFORMANCE AND CHIPS

Ah, my favorite realm. Tuning. So much power and yet consistently overlooked and downplayed. The possibilities are endless: huge power, huge disappointment, huge expense. I will attempt to keep this from being long and boring, hopefully I deliver.

What are performance chips?

Well this oughta be a no-brainer, but basically, anything that is not oem software on the oem ecus. This could be something tweaked for better fuel economy, bigger injectors, different turbo, cam, etc. Generally this involves modifying the fuel map(s) and timing maps, as well as other generally more subtle changes. The wrong selection here can have far-reaching consequences, the general idea would be to research this as you're coming up with your list of mods and try to leverage that information as best possible.



Are there any limitations to chips?

This is something that should be known to be true for all parts of any build.. there are limitations and caveats and results of every choice you'll make, and chips/engine management is no different. Chips generally fall short in a number of ways (although not always all at once).. more often than not you will get the best results if you don't deviate from what the chips were 'designed' for, this is more of a problem if you're not equipped to roll your own. Other things are a result of the overall system and not as much the chip itself, i.e. you're going to have to have an airflow sensor, the type of injection, resolution and accuracy (although to a point, the factory system works quite well, make no mistake about this), extensibility, the list of things that can throw it off is as long as there are possibilities for modifications of the car. Some things can and will result in catastrophic failures, other things might not be noticeable on their own until you start comparing notes with someone that has similar mods and discover that you're coming up short in some regard (mileage, performance, 'behavior', that sort of thing). The ability to re-play what has recently happened is also currently a limitation of the chip world. there is very little in the way of datalogging at the moment, this coupled with a lack of features and other 'constraints' of the stock system has generally led most people to accept/believe/expouse that up to a certain power level, chips are fine, and beyond that you should look around. What that power level is, really depends on you the owner, and that is something you will probably have to grapple with in time.



Does anyone make a chip for lh2.2 or lh2.4?

Yes. there are links floating around for this, so I will not spend much time on this subject except to say that generic chips will not have the overall fit and feel of chips tuned and tweaked to your specific vehicle/mods. In that regard, you should take into account what the provider of the chips suggests, and go from there.

Can I modify LH2.2 or LH2.4 myself?

Absolutely, and I wholeheartedly encourage you to explore this. Beepee has an excellent thread dedicated to this, and you would be well served to read most of it before diving in as a number of 'behaviors' are discussed at length through the thread, that might not be readily apparent when you first jump in.

Do they make a piggyback computer for my car?

Sadly, yes. depending on the piggy back and the system it's being applied to, you may have mixed results, it may not work at all, or it might work flawlessly. Generally speaking, with the knowledge and software currently available there is little need for a piggyback anymore, and I strongly encourage you to visit other options before this. With lh 2.4 specifically, you may (will) run into issues where the ecu will try and work around what the piggyback is doing. With MAF-modifiers (S-AFC type devices, that incercept and 'change' the maf signal to produce a result), you get the inconvenient side effect of modified timing values to go with your modified fuel values, and either you've scaled it off the top of the ignition map (which will probably result in poor performance relative to a good tune), or you've scaled it down for those bigass injectors you just had to have, and now you're knocking the pistons out of the bottom end, these are generally poorly suited for lh 2.4 cars. Your best bet if you simply have to have a piggyback, is to get something that will intercept the o2 signal and modify it, or disable o2 feedback in lh and carefully monitor whatever load changes you make to the system, otherwise it is likely to just 'do its own thing' (adapt) to what it sees as incorrect behavior, and you'll be in there tuning it again in two weeks.

Lh 2.0 and 2.2 are better in this regard as they have no long term memory and you can physically retard or advance the distributor to get things back in the ballpark. Age and wiring condition are the biggest hold-backs on these vehicles anymore.
K-jet doesn't really care what you do to it, but you're likely not going to get far without some kind of additional injector controller/msd-btm type of setup, as far as piggybacks are concerned.


Is there an aftermarket fuel injection computer that will work with my volvo?

there are dozens. Megasquirt is popular due to its low cost of entry and decent feature list, but just about any aftermarket management system will work. If you do not plan to tune this system yourself, you should ask your tuner what they are most familiar with/recommend, and go with that. Really this isn't much of a noob topic, this is more of a '300 and up' type of topic although that certainly isn't the lower bound. plenty of people have had excellent results ditching the stock system on otherwise stock volvos and getting some better power and economy; however the fact remains that this should not really be your first avenue of pursuit regardless of what you read elsewhere on the forum. The learning curve with any management system is front-loaded and very steep, and troubleshooting issues that arise during and after the installation of such can pose serious problems for the newly indoctrinated. The same problems apply here as with the stock ecu, and even more-so: lack of attention to detail can and will result in the destruction of your setup far faster than you would even consider possible, and the window of opportunity for disaster grows with power output. Read another way: the more power you're making, the faster things meltdown before you figure out that anything is even wrong, so tread carefully and try to understand fully what you're messing with and how it works. In reality, there is no way to really understand how such systems work prior to getting them on the car (short of using them on someone else's car), so again expect a steep learning curve. The time to be learning this is not right after you've dumped money into a new engine and turbo setup that hasn't run yet.

What the heck is megasquirt? Can I really tune it myself?

Megasquirt is a (can be a) DIY management system. As with most management systems you can tune it yourself if you have the required hardware/software. Read up on it at www.diyautotune.com and www.msextra.com

Oh crap, I don't know how to install my megasquirt

Like I said before, steep learning curve, sounds like you jumped in too early. The basics are simple, stick to the wiring diagrams at www.msextra.com and start with the minimum required to get the car running and work forward from there. You can always come back and add stuff/rewire it again later and there will always be things you'd wished you'd done differently. Yes, even the second and third times. Sometimes you won't realize these things until you're trying to work on the car.

What fuel injection system does my car have?

The old kind. But seriously, for any of the rwd volvos, you're looking at systems that were at best designed in the early to mid 80's.
pre 82 200 series cars are generally k-jet
all 200 series turbo cars are k-jet
some 83's (esp the 2.3s) are a form of LH, either 2.0 or 1.0
1984 700 turbos are lh 2.0
1985-89 700 series are lh 2.2 unless they're v6 cars, then... who cares, because they suck and should be punished as such
84-88 200 series NA cars are kind of a catch-all. some are lh 2.2 with a funny bosch ignition system, some have a 'Chrysler' ignition system. as none of these came turbocharged, you're kind of between a rock and a hardplace in terms of management decisions should you choose to turbo your car. retrofitting the ezk system from a 700 is a good option if you can find one without a garbage wiring harness, retrofitting lh 2.4 has considerations as well (needs a wheel speed sensor to work correctly as well as other things), but is also very doable. there is also of course the aftermarket management route. Whichever of these you choose, I would strongly urge you to do the electronics portion of the swap before you turbocharge the car (or swap in a turbo motor, or whatever your goal is). the road to abject failure is paved in the good intentions of projects that went a step to far too soon. One thing at a time. I cannot stress this enough. One thing at a time. work the bugs out of that, then move forward. Don't listen to other people who suggest a 'busy weekend' wire up and plumb up a turbo swap..it's not that it cannot be done in a weekend, it's that it frequently doesn't work out that way for ANYONE's first time, ESP if they are attempting this alone. Take your time, enjoy the process. Don't get too hung up on a number.

CHEAPASS PERFORMANCE... AKA JUNKYARD RACERS

What topic could possibly be more turbobricks than junkyard racers. Well, contrary to popular belief and dogma, the old saying still holds true: Cheap, reliable, fast. Choose two. That being said, just because you're broke does not mean you can't have a little bit of fun. As implied earlier, there are 'levels' of performance where decisions should be made, and I'll hopefully convey the 'norms' in a reasonably concise manor. These will be generalizations, and do not promise you won't be replacing parts sooner and faster. None of these should be considered set in stone and no part should be considered as reliable as when the car was stock.

For automatic transmission cars, the 'accumulator mod' should always be done, followed by a fluid flush, and you should strongly consider getting an additional transmission cooler. If these things are done and the box is in good shape, then *generally* you're reasonably safe to around 250-300hp. This will depend heavily on a number of factors (driving style, mods, power production, etc), but is a good *generalization*.

For manual transmission cars, 250ish hp with a decent clutch is about the accepted 'safe' limit, however you will likely still experience transmission failures at this level. they will be greatly accelerated the further past this you go, and as with the above, driving style will have a great influence on the rate at which you're blowing two afternoons.

Engines, see below

Rear end: open diff with a manual, will break if aggressively driven. getting a locker from a later 940 can cut down on these failures, and of course, not beating on the car 24/7 will also cut down on them. Also, not drag racing the car will go a long way for diff life.

Management will still reign happiness or hell upon you if you are not careful.

Other components will come in to play depending on use and abuse, things like the 7/900 subframe, exploding intercoolers, etc.

I can't afford to build an engine. What's the strongest volvo engine?

What's the goal? The early turbo motors (b21ft, b23ft) as well as the 90+ b230ft's are considered the 'strongest' but this is a relative term in that any of these can succumb to poor tuning, attention to detail, modification choices and execution of the build. If careful attention is given, any of these should (theoretically) hold 3-400hp, or more, depending on several factors. In most cases, keeping things at or under 300hp is 'safe' here stateside. Other things that can prolong engine life: put off the pleasure. Many people will frown at this suggestion for a variety of reasons, but part of the key to success for the swedes is in effect this. build the setup to make peak boost (and as a result power) much higher in the powerband than stock.. i.e. a large turbo that doesn't really hit hard until 4500, with a cam(s) and spring/retainer package that will allow it to turn on out to 7500 or so. The reasoning for this is relatively simple, things happen faster-the pistons are moving faster, knock has less time to exact forces on the pistons and rods, tuning changes will have a slightly 'duller' effect (which makes it easier to creep up to the desired power/tune state) as well. This type of setup is generally better suited to a car with a manual transmission, however, and a number of people find it tedious/counter productive/etc since it doesn't have the 'fun' factor that comes with instant torque from small turbo setups that peak early and fall off early. The path you choose here will dictate what you need to spend money on elsewhere on the car. For the common 15g crowd, a moderate set of injectors, relatively common chips, exhaust, mbc, and win. Going for large numbers on a budget...well... comes with it's own considerations and requirements, and to a certain extent not really a budget setup (in the grand scheme of things)



What's the cheapest way to go fast?

Quick hitter: Tuneup, mbc, exhaust. Or alternatively, start with a fast car. Ha Ha.

How fast is fast? A free flowing exhaust, mbc, and good state of tune will result in a very quick car that is fun to drive. For the more demanding, there are a variety of junkyard turbos and cheap intercoolers, and factory hotrod cams. The favorites in the crowd seem to be 15g/16t turbos found on fwd volvos; ford/nissan 60 trim t3 turbos, occasionally more exotic things can be found. Try and research this ahead of time before jumping on the first cheap thing coming by. After the turbo, and exhaust, most people like to replace the oem intercooler, there are a number of cheap options on ebay and in general these are decent moderate performing items. Factory cams that are popular include the A, the V, the K, with the K being the most common 'aggressive' factory cam, although recently a number of better aftermarket options have become readily available from IPD, RSI, as well as sweden, and they're fairly reasonably priced. At some point you're likely to cross over from cheap fast to decently invested fast, and you may find that your earlier decisions have resulted in less than ideal results with further infusion of money; so it would behoove you to consider your investments along the way.

best bang for the buck used injectors and worst used injectors

You can start with used injectors in general. It is my opinion that investing in used injectors in the first place is poor economy considering the relatively low cost of new injectors. You may like to gamble and certainly people have had success with used injectors, so I will provide the basic short list, with the caveat that you should seek out known working injectors vs junkyard injectors for a variety of reasons. But first, why am I against used injectors, esp junkyard injectors?

-you don't know the history of these injectors
-you don't know if they all work correctly or flow the same
getting them cleaned and tested runs the price up a good bit, and then what do you do when you find out two of them are way off from the rest? you get to buy more now, and get them cleaned and tested, etc etc.

Part of going down the cheap road is not having to re-spend the same money as a result of something failing and tearing up other things. Cams, turbos, things of that nature are generally low-impact in terms of catastrophic failures. Occasionally you'll have an interference issue with a really hot cam, but for the most part, failures here are more or less self-contained and mitigate-able (also considered the cost of doing business), whereas pushing a flaky injector can send you to the junkyard engine shopping faster than you would like. The going rate for engines at u-pull-it establishments rivals the cost of a set of new injectors. So, all of this aside

Popular injectors:
-'browntops' turbo ford injectors, generally 36 lb/hr, low-z injectors.
-'cfi' these are from throttle body injected fords of the early to mid 80's. a big hit a while ago due to their size (4-500cc's) however more recently these have proven to be far less evenly matched than is ideal with a fairly high failure rate.
-'dsm' injectors from 1g and 2g turbo eclipses, 460cc, low-z. good injectors if they're in good shape
-Rx-7 injectors, both NA and turbo. Size varries by year, some are in the mid 400's, some are 550's Some are high-z, some are low.
-850 turbo injectors, popular high-z injector for turbo conversions, 300ish cc's, more or less drop-in compatible with turbo ecu's but don't require the resistor packs



can I weld my own exhaust?

Absolutely. More info for this can be found in the exhaust discussion above. You'll obviously need access to a welder, and at the least a chop saw or band saw. a lift is a nice thing to have, as well as some means of propping the system up to the desired place/height for fitment. Same rules as above apply: make it somewhat modular for serviceability, put a flex section in there somewhere, and tuck the muffler(s) in good. The process of welding will depend on the material and the welder.
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