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Old 03-03-2009, 02:31 PM   #1
Karl Buchka
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Default Whiteblock in a 240 ver. 2 - Probably very little of what you'd like to know

Whiteblock in a 240 ver. 2 Probably very little of what you'd like to know

This is a continuation/rewrite/update of Alex's venerable old "Whiteblock in a 240" thread. Some sections are copy/pasted, but most is completely re-written and updated.

03/03/09 NOTE: Just posted, still need do some proper proof reading and add the 6 and 4 cyl. section.

Intro

So, you finally decided to save your beloved 240 from that cast iron lump of crap and replace it with a proper all aluminum, DOHC, turbo chick magnet? Well you've come to the right place. But first, a speedy run down on what exactly a whiteblock is:

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The whiteblock series of engines is the next generation volvo powerplant after the tried and true SOHC redblock. The engines aren't really white, more like cast aluminum silver. I'm not sure why they are called whiteblocks, maybe the name just sounded cool.

The whiteblock was designed as a modular inline engine in four, five, and six cylinder versions which could all be machined on a common production line to save time and money. Things like waterpumps, oil pumps, valvetrain components, ancillaries, pistons and rods are all common to many different types of whiteblocks. Volvos typical engine codename procedure carries over to the new whiteblocks with one twist. The first digit of the engine code designates the number of cylinders of the engine. For example, the B5254T (found in the S60R/V70R) is a gasoline powered five cylinder with 2.5l of displacement and 4 valves per cylinder.

-- Mark Twain
The main focus of this guide will be the 5 cylinder, as it is the most common. Five cylinder whiteblocks come in all sorts of configurations, anywhere from 2.0l to 2.5l in displacement with power output anywhere from 126hp to 300hp. The most common high performance whiteblock we are interested in is either the 225hp 850 Turbo engine (B5234T) or the 240hp S70 T5 powerplant (B5234T5). They are quite common, provide a healthy power increase over even a modified turbo redblock, and respond very well to modifications.

Disclaimer: Even though I try to be as comprehensive as possible, there's no way to cover all the bases of this swap in a single article. Running a whiteblock in a 240 is far from straighforward and frankly pretty weird, but I will try my hardest to answer the most obvious questions and cover the basics. Another critical factor here is that you cannot, repeat cannot, get through this swap without doing some welding and metal fabrication. If you're not equipped for this then I recommend you either keep it redblock or find yourself some welding and metalworking equipment.

Topics

Engine

You're obviously going to want to start by finding an engine, preferably as complete as possible. That is to say, with accessories, manifolds, turbo, and maybe even ECU and harness. I recommend you find something from a 94-97 850 Turbo/T5. Basically, anything older than '99 will be your best bet when keeping it simple, since they don't come with VVT or e-throttles. The 97-98 S70 T5 is also a possible choice, but going with this motor may cause some issues with engine mounts (see the motor mount section).

Transmission

This is where most of your high-dollar decisions are going to get made. The first choice to make is if you want an automatic or manual transmission.

-Automatic

This is the cheapest and easiest choice, especially for someone doing this swap in the US or Canada. Nine times out of ten, the motor you just bought will have come stock with an automatic, so you're already setup in terms of torque converter and flex plate. Just pull a transmission out of any non-turbo 960 and bolt it up. The electronics are trickier, but theoretically, all the 850 hardware should plug right in and work plug and play. This is uncomfirmed though. If you want to be crazy insane do what Chris Wiita did on his turbo 960 and ditch the TCU for paddle shifters.

-Manual

The easiest manual alternative is the M90 since it bolts up. It's a 5-speed transmission that came in non-turbo 960s. The issue here is that no 960s in the US or Canada ever came with a 5 speed, so you'll have to source one in Europe. If you can find someone willing to crate one for you, expect to pay $1000 or more to have one on your doorstep. If the idea of a factory bolt-on solution tickles your fancy, Fred has a sweet article on the M90 here.

The next best thing (in my opinion) is a Tremec/Borg-Warner T5. They're extremely easy to find and rebuild, and adapting one to a whiteblock is a fairly painless affair. The Ford T5-World Class is the ideal choice here, with a 330ft-lb torque rating, and a favorable input shaft length. The adapter plate is really pretty simple, but it does require lathe work as well as drilling and tapping. I had a machine shop do the turning, but my brother and I managed the drilling and tapping ourselves. The finished plate looks like this:



You'll want to start with a 12"x12"x1" piece of aluminum plate and a bellhousing from an automatic transmission 960. The hole in the middle of the plate is turned to fit snugly around the input shaft bearing retainer of the transmission. The lip you see is an 1/8" deep, is concentric to that first hole, and made to fit inside the transmission side of the bellhousing. Now that the transmission and bellhousing are centered to each other, we just need to mark and drill the bolt patterns. We did this with a transfer punch, a hand drill, and a tap set. It sucked, but it worked. A drillpress is definitely recommended here. If you don't feel comfortable drilling and tapping the plate yourself, I'm sure the machine shop would be happy to help you out. The final product should look something like this:



Clutch/flywheel

I recommend going with a single-mass flywheel from a manually shifted whiteblock car. I don't know for sure which cars got which flywheels, but I've heard 94-96 mentioned. In any case, it looks like this (the undesirable dual-mass unit is pictured in Fred's M90 thread):



If you went with the M90, then finding a pressure plate and clutch disk is as simple as buying an 850R clutch kit. If you didn't, then it gets a little trickier. Try posting a wanted thread on here or on Volvospeed to see if someone has a pressure plate for a single mass flywheel kicking around. I got mine by cheaping out and calling about a dozen wrecking yards until I found one that was willing to sell me a used pressure plate (don't do this). My clutch disc was a sprung hub 6 puck from Clutchnet with a spline count to match the transmission, and a diameter to match the pressure plate.

The 960 bellhousing does not have a pivot point for a clutch fork, but there is a hole on the side that can be clearanced and made to fit a redblock clutch fork. A window will have to be added to the opposite side to allow the fork to come out of the bellhousing. After some more grinding, the clutch fork will easily take a Mustang throwout bearing.



Another alternative would be to run a hydraulic clutch. That would negate the need for any drastic bellhousing mods, but would add to the cost and complexity.

Drive shaft

No matter what transmission you choose, a custom drive shaft will be required. Most drive shaft shops can make one to any specification for $300 or less.

Engine mounts

If you're using any flavor of 850 motor, 960 upper mounts will bolt on. These will greatly simplify hanging the engine. The mounting bosses are already present on the block and three out of the four holes on each side are threaded. If you are not comfortable drilling into your engine block, it is not absolutely necessary to tap those two holes - the mounts will hold fine with just three proper bolts. If you choose to tap the holes, they already have pilot holes drilled and need to be tapped to M8x1.25 thread. If you instead opted for an S70 motor, you may have issues with the passenger side mount. I can't speak for MY97 motors, but the 98 S70 engine Alex has sitting around does not share a single passenger side mounting boss with either of the 850 engines we have. If you are building custom upper mounts then this is a moot point, but it's critically important if you're looking to cut down on fabrication work.

Lower mounts need to be fabricated. No bolt-on solution exists. Captain Bondo here on the board made some very simple and functional lower mounts that my brother and I shamelessly ripped off when we did the swap in my car. They are just two pieces of box section. One side is pictured here. Note the use of 240 rubber isolators between the upper and lower mounts.



Hanging the engine in this fashion will provide a very stable mount. You can easily get away with using the cheapest 240 rubber mounts. Polyurethane versions are completely unnecessary.

It's important to note that since a whiteblock is normally mounted to tilt 11 degrees toward the passenger side, 960 mounts will offset that and provide perfectly horizontal mounting surfaces.

The positioning of the engine in the bay is largely contingent on the presence of absence of power steering. A manual steering rack is significantly thinner than a power rack, and will allow a nice, deep mounting position. A power rack necessitates the removal of some oil pan webbing as well as a less ideal overall placement.

As an aside, if you choose to mount the engine straight up and down, you will need both custom upper and lower mounts. Here's a picture of one solution using half of an old 240 torque rod:



Oiling system

This is one of the trickiest parts of the entire swap. The stock oil pan from a five cylinder mounted in a FWD configuration will absolutely not clear the crossmember in a 240. It is simply too thick - the sump stretches the entire length of the pan. The 960 however, does have a perfect oil pan with a generous relief for the crossmember and a nice and large rear sump. The 960 is equipped with a six cylinder whiteblock, so the cast aluminum pan needs to be cut, shortened and welded back together in order to fit the shorter five cylinder. The best pan to find is from a 95-96 or newer 960. These pans have the oil filter bung pressed in to the pan, just like 850s. If you get an older pan, you will either need to find some way to add a bung to the pan, or tap the block so you can thread the 960 bung in. Here's a photo of a shortened 960 pan next to an untouched one. Note the oil filter bungs on the bottom left:



The pan halves should ideally be jigged to a 5 cylinder block girdle and 960 bellhousing before welding, but securely clamping it to a flat surface like a chassis table is also acceptable. In any case, the mounting surface should be machined flat before installation. My pan was improperly clamped during welding and was not machined, and as a result I was plagued by constant oil leaks. The added expense of doing it right the first time is absolutely critical if you want to avoid headaches in the future.

The 960 pickup tube will also need to be shortened to fit the shortened pan.

A 960 dip stick and dip stick tube are required to properly read the oil level.

Cooling system

This is the steel tube that connects to the input of the water pump and provides several barbed connections to the radiator, heater core, turbo, and overflow tank. The 850 transfer tube has the radiator return passing under the exhaust manifold and exiting by the firewall, which makes it completely unsuitable. The 960 version can be used, but still requires modification to fit, as it hits the upper engine mount. Cutting off the cylinder head return pipe and substituting it for the 850 version solves the problem. A new hole needs to be cut in the 960 tube for this, as well as plugging the old one.



After some slight trimming, an 850 upper radiator hose fits perfectly to connect the thermostat housing to the radiator. This assumes you're using intercooled turbo radiator brackets. A 240 lower radiator hose is also a great fit for the return connection.

A few 90 degree brass elbows and some heater hose allow for a tight but problem free heater core hook up. The end of the water transfer tube may need to be shorted a few inches to properly fit the barb.



Manifolds

If you buy a five cylinder built after '99 you already have this intake manifold, so you're mostly in the clear. For everyone else, the early five cylinders had a dual runner length intake which 1) is absolutely massive and adds some uneeded weight, 2) doesn't really work that well, and 3) effectively places the throttle body inside the firewall. With the throttle body removed, the throttle body flange on the intake manifold lands about 1" from the firewall. Some people have fixed this by welding the hole shut and making a new one on the opposite side. Most of us don't have the resources to do this, so it is easier to get the newer intake manifold which places the throttle body underneath the runners. The issue (because there's always an issue) with the newer manifold is that it comes on cars with electronic throttles, so no bolt-on hook up for a cable spool exists. We solved this by hacking up and adapting an 850 throttle body and cable spool. Be careful when mounting the spool. If you do it wrong the throttle will so touchy as to make the car near undriveable (ask me how I know). The new manifold looks like this:



If you're just going with the stock turbo, then the stock exhaust manifold will work fine. It's not the greatest performer and the firewall clearance is tight, but it works. Since the turbo is effectively pointing 'backwards' from the factory, some minor drilling is required to allow the turbo to be flipped around. Unthread the two studs from the turbine housing's flange and drill out the threads so a bolt can pass through. That should allow you to re-orient the turbo on the manifold.

PCV

The intake side 960 motor mount interferes with the 850 crankcase breather box. The top side of the mount has to be notched a little bit. 5 minutes with a cut off wheel solves this.

Power steering

I have no personal experience with anything in this section, so take it with a grain of salt. Running a 240 power rack with an unmodified whiteblock pump apparently works without issue. I have spoken with a Swede who has done this successfully. You will need to have a custom high pressure line made up by a hydraulic shop, and the intake manifold may need to have a small, unused mounting boss ground off to fit the pump. A new upper radiator hose might also be needed.

EMS

If the high-dollar decision was in the transmission section, then this is the high-braincell decision. Or something. You have many different options for actually getting the engine running. I only have experience on these motors with Megasquirt and VEMS, so those sections will have the most complete and reliable information.

-Stock Management

This is definitely a good choice if you feel unsure about tuning an aftermarket system. The issues are getting the wiring right and solving the distributor problem. Wiring is pretty straight forward, but requires a lot of work. Find yourself some 850 wiring diagrams (here), some 240 wiring diagrams (here), and get ready for fun times.

The distributor on an 850 is mounted on the back of the head and is driven by the intake cam. As you may have guessed, this creates some serious clearance problems with the 240's firewall. Your options are to either make a big-ass notch in the firewall, move the distributor to the front of the engine, (maybe) convert the ECU to coil on plug (I've heard you can do this, but I know nothing about it), or ditch the stock management. Moving it to the front of the engine requires you make some sort of mounting bracket that will allow the distributor to float in front of the intake cam gear. This has the added effect of making the rotor move backwards through it's rotation, so the plug wires will need to be installed in reverse order.

If you're using an ECU originally from an automatic transmission equipped 850/S70, then ditching the transmission computer entirely will not cause any major problems. The older Motronic versions (pre-99) will simply throw a code/CEL and deactivate the boost control solenoid. Adding a manual boost controller will get you back up to speed. Companies who offer chip tuning services can also 'convert' the ECU to a manual transmission version when they add their performance maps.

-Megasquirt

In terms of aftermarket systems, this is about as cost effective as it gets. Running a 5 cylinder with coil on plug is about as complicated as you're likely to get with Megasquirt. It requires a modified cam trigger and some fancy pants trigger settings. Most of what you need to know is outlined in this thread. A very important fact that has yet to be added to the thread is you can't use the 4-pin ignition coils with Megasquirt. They cause constant resets and general mayhem. Switching over to two-pin 960 coils with external ignitors is your best bet.

-VEMS

This is the system I currently run on my car. Hardware wise it is extremely capable, but the software is confusing and the documentation is even worse. I really can't stress how ****ty the documentation is. It's certainly getting better, but even with prior experience assembling and installing Megasquirt, it was a very steep learning curve. I detailed the assembly, installation, and set up on the VEMS wiki here.

-Other

There are lots and lots of other aftermarket systems that will drive a 5 cylinder. Nira makes a plug-and-play programmable EMS for 5 cylinders. This is a great option if you're looking to upgrade from a stock unit. Chesh has chosen Haltech for his 5 cylinder 740 project.
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Last edited by Karl Buchka; 11-11-2009 at 07:45 AM..
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Old 03-03-2009, 04:19 PM   #2
t5 pete
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Thankyou all of this is very herlpfull and must have took ages to write up.
Cheers pete
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Old 03-03-2009, 11:44 PM   #3
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240 torque rod engine mounts ftw
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Old 03-04-2009, 04:55 PM   #4
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Very useful write up for me,thanks
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Old 03-05-2009, 10:44 AM   #5
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Great article, I just have one question: Is it necessary to modify the crossmember when mounting the engine straight up, or is that just something you guys are doing to give the engine more clearance to sit lower in the bay?
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Old 03-05-2009, 10:53 AM   #6
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Mounting it straight up with a 960 oil pan, power steering rack, and unmodified fire wall is questionable. It's absolutely possible and doesn't present any issues except for the fact that the motor ends up very far forward. Far enough to where your fist would easily fit between the back of the head and the fire wall. Now that I think about it, the distro might actually still fit if you go this route. Personally it's way too far forward for my taste.

I say either keep it tilted and bolt on the 960 stuff or hack up the firewall and make everything from scratch like karl and I are doing.
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Old 03-05-2009, 10:57 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phenry View Post
Great article, I just have one question: Is it necessary to modify the crossmember when mounting the engine straight up, or is that just something you guys are doing to give the engine more clearance to sit lower in the bay?
Thanks.

Technically it doesn't need to be notched to get it that far back, but if you're removing the entire firewall then you might as well notch the crossmember.
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Old 03-05-2009, 01:03 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Buchka View Post
Mounting it straight up with a 960 oil pan, power steering rack, and unmodified fire wall is questionable. It's absolutely possible and doesn't present any issues except for the fact that the motor ends up very far forward. Far enough to where your fist would easily fit between the back of the head and the fire wall. Now that I think about it, the distro might actually still fit if you go this route. Personally it's way too far forward for my taste.

I say either keep it tilted and bolt on the 960 stuff or hack up the firewall and make everything from scratch like karl and I are doing.
First off, great writeup guys!


FWIW though, I can tilt my motor vertically as-is, with no sheetmetal mods, other than maybe trimming that little lip at the top of the firewall slightly.You definitely can't get you fist in there, the head is pretty tight to the firewall because of course the sump has to sit behind the crossmember.


In fact, my motor is semi-upright currently, about halfway between the stock slant and upright.

I would have just stood it right up honestly, but the intake manifold hits the booster, and i couldn't bear the thought of building yet another #$%$ing manifold.

I don't recommend the stock slanted mounting, FWIW. Manifold/turbo clearance sucks the big one.
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Old 03-05-2009, 01:12 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain Bondo View Post

I don't recommend the stock slanted mounting, FWIW. Manifold/turbo clearance sucks the big one.

it's a pain to get the mani and turbo in there, but for me the hassle of modifying the pan and pickup was also an issue - and so i took the quickest/easiest route to getting ti in there, though i'd like to change the orientation to upright with the next version this summer.

also, not that it really matters, but when mounted upright the whiteblock just looks so badass.
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Old 03-05-2009, 01:17 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain Bondo View Post
First off, great writeup guys!


FWIW though, I can tilt my motor vertically as-is, with no sheetmetal mods, other than maybe trimming that little lip at the top of the firewall slightly.You definitely can't get you fist in there, the head is pretty tight to the firewall because of course the sump has to sit behind the crossmember.
Thanks. Well, you have to remember that you're dealing with an extra cylinder. That really makes all the difference in terms of swaybar and steering rack to oil pan clearance. There's just no way in hell to get the same setback with a 5 cylinder and a power steering rack.
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Old 03-05-2009, 02:03 PM   #11
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Justin,

I only tilted it maybe 10 degrees in my case, it bought me a good 2-3 inches worth of clearance. I can't imagine any oil pickup issues (haven't modded the pickup/pan in any way).

I literally cut right hand side motor mount bracket (stock 960 one) in half, offset it about 1.5" to lift that side of the motor up, and welded it back together, and lowered the other mount in a similar fashion.

The main thing is I have a hard time imagining a compressor cover bigger than a T04E housing being an easy fit with the engine tilted- maybe with some manner of huge top mount manifold that places the turbo almost up behind the headlight. The T67 was NOT fitting with the stock slant in my case, even top mounted it didn't look good.


Karl,

Yeah I realized after the fact you meant clearance of the bump in the pan due to the oil pickup on a 5, not the actual sump.
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Old 03-05-2009, 02:25 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain Bondo View Post
Justin,

I only tilted it maybe 10 degrees in my case, it bought me a good 2-3 inches worth of clearance. I can't imagine any oil pickup issues (haven't modded the pickup/pan in any way).



ah, i dig.

actually mine a few degrees closer to upright than stock as well, i thought you mean straight up, my bad.

so karl and alex - what do you think about the pickup angle with the engine being straight up?
how do you think people would fair with a dry sump setup, and suggestions?
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Old 03-05-2009, 02:43 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kildea View Post
ah, i dig.

actually mine a few degrees closer to upright than stock as well, i thought you mean straight up, my bad.

so karl and alex - what do you think about the pickup angle with the engine being straight up?
how do you think people would fair with a dry sump setup, and suggestions?
I wouldn't run a stock pick up or sump with a straight mounted engine. That's not to say it wouldn't work, but I just don't like it. Here's a pic from under the car:



You can clearly see that if anything is going to hit, it's going to be the sump. Even with the relatively unique mounting depth I don't think this is an exceptional case, because if you look at the shallow part of the sump you can see it's still above the plane of the crossmember. My main concern would actually be oil starvation during cornering. Even though the sump is absolutely massive, I can't say I would sleep well knowing it was like that.

Later today I'll take some pics to illustrate how the pickup and dipstick fall inside the sump when the engine is mounted like that.

Dry sump would obviously be the ideal solution for a nice, low, mounting, but at this point I see it mostly as a massive amount of work and at least an equally massive expense.
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Old 03-05-2009, 03:05 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Karl Buchka View Post
I wouldn't run a stock pick up or sump with a straight mounted engine. That's not to say it wouldn't work, but I just don't like it.

You can clearly see that if anything is going to hit, it's going to be the sump. Even with the relatively unique mounting depth I don't think this is an exceptional case, because if you look at the shallow part of the sump you can see it's still above the plane of the crossmember. My main concern would actually be oil starvation during cornering. Even though the sump is absolutely massive, I can't say I would sleep well knowing it was like that.
Agree completely- you could possibly do it, but you're definitely tempting fate at the very least. I think the few degree tip we're both doing seems to be a good compromise.
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Old 03-11-2009, 05:23 PM   #15
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Old 03-12-2009, 12:20 AM   #16
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Quote:
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What was the input shaft length on the T5 you used? I have the 960 bellhousing and I might be able to get my hands on a 94 or 95 T5, but the input shaft is longer @ 7.85 instead of 7.18. If I had the longer input shaft do you think it would still work with a thicker adapter plate or would the shaft have to be cut down?

Excellent write up BTW...
of course you could go thicker with the adapter, it'd cost a bit more for the material and you'd pick up a little weight but in the grand scheme of things it's insignificant.

if you are looking for an extra .6 inch in plate just get .5 inch thicker plate and go .1 inch shallower with the cut that fits the bell circle pictured above.
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Old 03-14-2009, 02:46 PM   #17
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Hello i am unsure on a way to get around moving the distributer to the front of the engine and how it is done would some one please explaine this to me.
Also karl i would be greatfull if you could post the pictures up to illustraight how the pickup and dipstick fall inside the sump when the engine is mounted like that.
Thankyou pete
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Old 03-14-2009, 04:12 PM   #18
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Do you want to move it, or just remove it?

I'll post pics of the sump later tonight.
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Old 03-14-2009, 04:21 PM   #19
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I want to keep the standard ecu so just move it would be my best option if that is possible.
thankyou pete
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Old 03-14-2009, 06:52 PM   #20
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You need to attach the rotor holder to the front of the cam gear, and build some kind of bracket that bolts to the head and holds the cap in place. I've never done it, but it has been done. If I was dead set on keeping the distributor I would just notch the firewall. Much less room for error.
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Old 03-14-2009, 07:04 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Karl Buchka View Post
You need to attach the rotor holder to the front of the cam gear, and build some kind of bracket that bolts to the head and holds the cap in place. I've never done it, but it has been done. If I was dead set on keeping the distributor I would just notch the firewall. Much less room for error.
Thankyou for your help ill notch the fire wall.
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Old 07-05-2009, 06:15 PM   #22
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Okay, I am picking up my parts car next weekend. This writeup is great and it is not too difficult to translate what you have said here for the 6 cyl swap. I am anxious to get this thing going and for now, it will be easier since I have the entire car to pull parts from, as well as all of the wiring, etc. As for space concerns, I hope to mount my engine straight up and down with no slant. I will be n/a for now with the possibility of a supercharger down the road.
I am subscribing to this thread now and hope to learn as well as contribute to it as I get started with my project.

Notes for my intentions:
-Mount I-6 perpendicular to x member.
-Mount I-6 without cutting firewall.
-Use stock 960 transmision and all control boxes.
-Add tone ring to 240 diff to control trans.
-Use dash and instr cluster from 960.
-Use all 960 accessories (alt, ps pump a/c comp)
-Modify 960 driveshaft with 240 rear half.

I think I am on the right track, but feel free to correct me if something seems unrealistic.

Thanks!!
Chris
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Old 07-06-2009, 12:31 AM   #23
Alex Buchka
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If you want to do this with as little hassle as possible I strongly recommend you keep the engine slanted. The engine will sit lower, the oil pan will easily clear the steering rack, swaybar, and crossmember, the sump will be parallell to the ground instead of having a big lump hanging down that can get torn off.
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Old 07-06-2009, 10:06 AM   #24
Rectilinear
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With the 24v I6? I thought it sat upright in the 960 already. If it has a slant to it, I will keep it slanted.
BTW, what is the reason for not using the stock 960 mounts? They are fluid filled, correct? Is it just for the price difference of replacement down the road?
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Old 07-06-2009, 07:07 PM   #25
Captain Bondo
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As was described in the article- you can use the 960 motor side engine mount bracket for the right mount fairly easily. Weld the "platform" to the frame rail, then use whatever mount ou feel like in between, really.


Left side stuff doesn't work well since the rack/steering shaft is in the way.

I tipped my motor up a bit- but not fully upright. It helps turbo clearance, at the expense of intake manifold clearance.

Fully upright also won't happen with either a 960 or T6 style intake manifold, in addition to the aforementioned oilpan considerations.

Why you want to swap the spaghetti of harnesses from the 960 is beyond me.




Karl/Alex -

You might tweak the article- that steel coolant pipe is the bypass pipe and it is not the water pump output, it is the water pump input.

Doesn't make or break the swap, but might as well not confuse people who don't understand that it is the "suction" side of the cooling system.
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