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Old 07-12-2016, 05:10 PM   #101
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What a difference nice reflectors make!
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Old 07-19-2016, 08:25 PM   #102
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Sweeeet ride! Love the white 242, lookin good

I ordered those stickers to put on the hubcaps and they look good
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Old 07-21-2016, 07:00 PM   #103
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My new center cap stickers finally arrived!









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Old 07-21-2016, 07:17 PM   #104
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Did you know that RS centers fit Style 5s as well?
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Old 07-21-2016, 07:25 PM   #105
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Did you know that RS centers fit Style 5s as well?
I did not know that, but that must be how people get polished center nuts on their Style 5s.
Thanks for the info!
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Old 07-21-2016, 07:27 PM   #106
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You can find polished center caps on some Lincoln Town Cars with mesh wheels. They just sort of press tightly onto the hex. I grabbed some from the junkyard but haven't tried them yet. I wouldn't spend a lot since I'm not sure if they like to fly off over time.
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Old 07-21-2016, 07:56 PM   #107
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I did not know that, but that must be how people get polished center nuts on their Style 5s.
Thanks for the info!
Dan Crandall knows exactly what goes into it. I'm sure you know how to get a hold of him!
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Old 07-22-2016, 12:48 AM   #108
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Love both your 242s man, great work on this one and I can't believe that find from the estate sale.. 75, Louvers.. You're a lucky guy. I'm from over the mountain but drive my wagon over frequently! I'd love to go on a cruise over there somewhere too as its already a favorite pastime
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Old 07-25-2016, 04:05 PM   #109
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Thanks everyone!
Got to work on the car a bit this weekend, from 11:00pm to 3:00 am while the family slept. My free time is scarce around our house, so I do a lot of of my project car stuff at night. It kind of sucks when it's something heavy, but it's nice when the jobs allow me to bring the parts in the house and work in the comfortable, warn, music-filled living room. LOL

The front seats in my car already new seat bottoms, but the backrests were totally broken down and disgusting:





I have collected some good condition seat parts from Jack and Luke (Thanks!) But they are all 244 seats, so the seat release mechanism had to be added. It's a pretty straightforward job, just really time consuming and annoying. I took a few pictures of the tricky and/or notable parts of the swap.

Here's my workshop (living room) with all the various seat backs all over the place:


242 versus 244 backrest attachment:



the attachment is a direct swap:


Two Philips screws hold the seat back release lever:


A tiny clip holds the release lever plastic handle in place. Just pry it up a bit and pull the plastic straight off:


The most annoying part of the job was having to cut holes in the frame and foam for the seat release lever mechanism:





After that was done, it was just a matter of hooking up the cables, routing them through the lumbar area, and just bolting everything back together.




Trim the seat cover, and install the trim plate. I am annoyed that I got it a bit (a lot!) crooked, but it works just fine, and is not outwardly noticeable in the car.





I took the time to add a couple of thin layers of foam to the driver's side outer bolster, because it was a bit flattened, but other than that, assembly was the reverse of removal. And then repeat for the passenger side. I wasn't fast about it, and it took me a good 2 hours per seat.

After a bit of scrubbing with carpet cleaner, they look better, feel a lot better, and smell clean. Makes me much happier to drive the car!



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Old 07-25-2016, 04:17 PM   #110
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Looks great; thanks for documenting that process! I was planning to do this exact same job on the same shade of late-model seats in a white '82 242 DL when I had one, but didn't accomplish that before selling :-)

Style 5s are looking great on this too. Carry on..
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Old 07-25-2016, 05:37 PM   #111
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Yep
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Old 07-26-2016, 06:55 PM   #112
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Great write up. That should be turned into an article and posted somewhere other members can easily see/find it.
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Old 08-01-2016, 03:02 AM   #113
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looks like ****
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I regretfully agree with Jack.
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make k-jet great again.
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Old 08-01-2016, 02:27 PM   #114
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Nice!
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Old 08-02-2016, 12:03 AM   #115
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After a bit of scrubbing with carpet cleaner, they look better, feel a lot better, and smell clean. Makes me much happier to drive the car!



If the old smells come back, try removing the seats and scrubbing them with a mix of water, white vinegar and a Oxyclean (or 20 Mule Team Botax, I love that stuff). Cleans nice and really gets the deep down sweat out that seems to creep back up in time. Then hose it down with a garden hose and let it sit in the sun to dry. If you can, do the carpets too. Your car will smell like heaven on those hot summer days for years to come. And the crud that rinses out of the carpets will amaze you. If you decide to do it, avoid using a pressure washer. My experience (others may differ) is that it removes some of the carpet fibers and the carpets are already a bit thin. The garden hose on high dose just fine. Oh yeah and don't forget the back seat!

You have a lovely car. My 16 year old is following your thread. He's refurbishing a white 83/242 and keeping it simple but attractive too. You're helping him just by doing your thing,
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Old 08-02-2016, 02:58 PM   #116
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Originally Posted by Tuff240 View Post
Great write up. That should be turned into an article and posted somewhere other members can easily see/find it.
Thanks! Maybe I'll repost in the non-performance area with a little more detail.

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looks like ****
Thanks, dick!

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Nice!
Thanks!

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If the old smells come back, try removing the seats and scrubbing them with a mix of water, white vinegar and a Oxyclean (or 20 Mule Team Botax, I love that stuff). Cleans nice and really gets the deep down sweat out that seems to creep back up in time. Then hose it down with a garden hose and let it sit in the sun to dry. If you can, do the carpets too. Your car will smell like heaven on those hot summer days for years to come. And the crud that rinses out of the carpets will amaze you. If you decide to do it, avoid using a pressure washer. My experience (others may differ) is that it removes some of the carpet fibers and the carpets are already a bit thin. The garden hose on high dose just fine. Oh yeah and don't forget the back seat!

You have a lovely car. My 16 year old is following your thread. He's refurbishing a white 83/242 and keeping it simple but attractive too. You're helping him just by doing your thing,
That's awesome! It's really cool to hear that my little updates and tiny projects can help someone directly. I know that I've benefited a TON from reading little details in people's builds, and that's why I bother with these. I'd love to be posting progress about building a custom stainless turbo header, custom short coilovers, a roll cage, full repaint, and other crazy big projects. But it's these little things that help sort a car out and make it enjoyable to drive. Plus, these little projects are cheaper and require less time, so you can do one per weekend and feel good about your car without getting too deep into it and losing enthusiasm.

Thanks for the tip on the cleaning. One of my future weekends is going to involve pulling the seats, door panels, and carpet, and going to town cleaning, re-winding the seat belt mechanisms, lubing and re-attaching the center console to reduce squeeks, etc.... But first, I need to get new motor mounts installed, center support bearing, one of the strut mounts, an alignment, and a couple of other maintenance items. It'll get there, one thing at a time.
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Old 08-11-2016, 03:48 AM   #117
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pictures of resprayed interior
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Old 08-11-2016, 05:42 PM   #118
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Never got that far, but I did clean up and paint the headlight buckets and grill. I got these from Pat244ti a while back. They came off his silver 244 race car: http://forums.turbobricks.com/showthread.php?t=43122 He had some clear headlight covers on them, so the buckets had glue and screw holes in them:


I chipped all the gunk off, sanded them down, and painted them with Duplicolor bumper paint. Turned out great!















Very happy with how it turned out. I ran out of paint, otherwise I would have painted that section of body underneath the headlight buckets that you can see through the little grills at the bottom. So now I need to get a few more cans of the same paint to do the bumpers, wipers, rockers, and window trim.

I have some spare lexan in the garage, and those holes are already drilled into the buckets. So I might try adding covers like Pat had, except without the tape. It might look awesome. If not, I'll just take them off.

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Old 08-11-2016, 06:20 PM   #119
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Using the 242 as a truck:



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Old 08-23-2016, 04:13 PM   #120
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Just went through this entire thread today.

Fantastic work!

If I was to get into the Volvo game, which would be the best year model that's "easy" to work on?

I'm trying to avoid complicated electrical systems.
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Old 08-23-2016, 05:46 PM   #121
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Just went through this entire thread today.

Fantastic work!

If I was to get into the Volvo game, which would be the best year model that's "easy" to work on?

I'm trying to avoid complicated electrical systems.
If you want to get into 240s, 83-93. The later ones are nicer, the earlier ones have more style.
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Old 08-23-2016, 06:52 PM   #122
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Originally Posted by VintageCarLEDs View Post

If I was to get into the Volvo game, which would be the best year model that's "easy" to work on?

I'm trying to avoid complicated electrical systems.
240 Volvos are very simple with regards to electronics. I found them to be a very easy and interesting transition from VWs. They even used the same ceramic fuses, from the late 60s all the way into 1993! LOL

Turbo cars have CIS injection, like 80s VWs. I would avoid that because when it goes wrong, it sucks.
Early 80s volvos have issues with the engine wiring harness, because the insulation tends to crumble and cause shorts. But it's not so difficult to swap a harness. About like doing a new wire loom in an aircooled VW.

I picked specifically the 1983 242 for a variety of aesthetic reasons:
-1983 was the first year for black plastic bumpers, rather than the earlier aluminum commando bumpers
-1983 is the last year for 5 panel tail lights, and I like those better than the later 6 panel units
-earlier 240s had 7" round headlights and flathoods, but they are interchangable onto all 240s up to 1986.
-in 1986, they went to the huge rectangular headlights, and a bulbous hood and cowl, and trunklid.
-I swapped the headlights and flat hood onto my car, because I don't really like the chrome mirrors on the earlier 240s
-the solid colors are single stage volvo paint which is extraordinary. metallic paints have a clearcoat layer, and tend to peel.

As far as choosing a first Volvo, the electronics shouldn't be an issue on any of them really, aside from the engine harness issue. Even things like power windows and locks are easy to fix. In general, later cars had better parts, like Athlon said. But all in all, if you like the look of an early car and you're coming from the world of VWs, you'll be totally happy. There's not too much of a learning curve, and every little weird detail (like heater control failures) are easy to find answers to on turbobricks.
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Old 08-23-2016, 07:21 PM   #123
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240 Volvos are very simple with regards to electronics. I found them to be a very easy and interesting transition from VWs. They even used the same ceramic fuses, from the late 60s all the way into 1993! LOL

Turbo cars have CIS injection, like 80s VWs. I would avoid that because when it goes wrong, it sucks.
Early 80s volvos have issues with the engine wiring harness, because the insulation tends to crumble and cause shorts. But it's not so difficult to swap a harness. About like doing a new wire loom in an aircooled VW.

I picked specifically the 1983 242 for a variety of aesthetic reasons:
-1983 was the first year for black plastic bumpers, rather than the earlier aluminum commando bumpers
-1983 is the last year for 5 panel tail lights, and I like those better than the later 6 panel units
-earlier 240s had 7" round headlights and flathoods, but they are interchangable onto all 240s up to 1986.
-in 1986, they went to the huge rectangular headlights, and a bulbous hood and cowl, and trunklid.
-I swapped the headlights and flat hood onto my car, because I don't really like the chrome mirrors on the earlier 240s
-the solid colors are single stage volvo paint which is extraordinary. metallic paints have a clearcoat layer, and tend to peel.

As far as choosing a first Volvo, the electronics shouldn't be an issue on any of them really, aside from the engine harness issue. Even things like power windows and locks are easy to fix. In general, later cars had better parts, like Athlon said. But all in all, if you like the look of an early car and you're coming from the world of VWs, you'll be totally happy. There's not too much of a learning curve, and every little weird detail (like heater control failures) are easy to find answers to on turbobricks.
+1 to a well-written, well-thought-out write-up.

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Old 08-23-2016, 08:31 PM   #124
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Nice work. Why didn't you just swap the foam from the good 244 seats onto the frames of the 242 seats? Seems like you gave yourself extra work. That was also the time to put all of the fabric in the washing machine for a like new seat. Nice work on the headlight frames.
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Old 08-23-2016, 08:47 PM   #125
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Using the 242 as a truck:

Dayum, round lights offset all the boxy boxiness perfectly...(he said wistfully while looking at the giant yellow portable TVs on his 745)

And like that refrigerator white...

Just a cage and some suspension and find some nice twisty gravel roads...
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