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Old 09-18-2019, 11:36 AM   #676
MikeSr.
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Hey, Tom- I have a ZF rack from a Bertone with new boots. $100 if you wanna zip down here and get it. Pm if interested.
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Old 09-20-2019, 08:34 PM   #677
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Dropped by MikeSr. home today . . . didn't just drop by . . . drove 75 miles and the GPS only screwed up once. Sorta intentional.

Took him up on his offer of a fabled ZF rack that had been rebuilt and few miles on it.



It looks like that it would fit into any other 240 series car but the oil pan of the PRV makes it a tight fit. The issue is the high pressure hose. The rack high pressure port and the PRV pump output are only a few inches apart. For that reason I would make the assumption that Volvo routed hard line all the way to the right to allow for a rubber hose connection back across to the pump for vibration isolation from the engine.

. . . since this unique 60 degree V6 is a little rough especially at idle.
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Old 09-20-2019, 09:15 PM   #678
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Pretty sure that's a 90 degree V6 Tom.....similar to the Maserati V6 used in the Citroen SM, and with even-fire crank pins. 60 degree V6's are smooth as silk. Hope to see you there!
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Old 09-21-2019, 07:48 PM   #679
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Anyone got a ZF passenger side mounting kit for MikeSr's ZF rack? It didn't come with one and I had hoped the CAM mounting would, could, should work. No cigar.
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Old 09-21-2019, 08:01 PM   #680
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Might want to put it out to the broader TB network in a separate post Tom. My last replacement I switched from CAM to ZF -- so I used the same kit you're looking for.
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Old 09-22-2019, 11:45 AM   #681
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Texted u a pic of what I have for the rack
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Old 09-22-2019, 03:06 PM   #682
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I don't have your number in my new phone.
If still in need I have this,
Not sure which rack I have? I'll try to get a peak.
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Old 09-22-2019, 03:51 PM   #683
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Is that dark grey piece the “saddle” you need Tom?
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Old 09-22-2019, 04:09 PM   #684
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That looks like a ZF2 rack according to this chart from Maval so it should use the steel block saddle. It shows that ZF and CAM racks use both style saddles which explains why Volvo sold a kit that covers both mounting types.


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Old 09-22-2019, 04:28 PM   #685
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I think I have the hardware too!
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Old 09-22-2019, 04:49 PM   #686
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Brad, that appears to be the entire Volvo kit for both racks. The steel 'saddle' is what I need. Guess what, I have changed phones also and don't find your number in my current version. PM to follow.

I am buying a couple other things from hiperfauto and he has the steel saddle and looking for the top piece. We will resolve shortly.
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Old 09-22-2019, 05:36 PM   #687
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M.H. Yount View Post
Is that dark grey piece the “saddle” you need Tom?
Yes. HiPerfAuto says he has it. I question whether there is a second piece to the attachment beyond the clamp loop that he is looking for. There is a notch cast into the aluminum rack end for the clamp to fit into. Not sure where another piece would go.

Brad, hold on to your stuff for a moment. I am ordering a couple other things from him at the moment.
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Old 09-22-2019, 05:50 PM   #688
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You're right, all you need is the steel saddle and the U bolt for the passenger side. This is all that's required (except the U bolt & nuts) to mount a ZF2 rack.

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Old 09-26-2019, 08:03 PM   #689
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Ian,

Got the stuff. Guess I have to lay on the floor tomorrow and install the ZF rack now.

Got a CAM II rebuild kit from the postal fairy also. During a dark and stormy night this winter I guess I will try to rebuild the CAM rack.

I also have the AW70 overdrive transmission to freshen up for this car also.

Who said that you couldn't have too much fun?
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Old 09-27-2019, 03:49 PM   #690
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Glad the kit made it to you! I knew I'd never get around to rebuilding a rack anytime soon.
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Old 09-27-2019, 05:29 PM   #691
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Quote:
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Glad the kit made it to you! I knew I'd never get around to rebuilding a rack anytime soon.
I'll take pictures. Replacing the seals on just the right and left shafts appears, in the GreenBooks, not to be all that big a deal.

With two 200 series cars in operation I guess I had better rebuild the 25k mile rack and hang it on the garage wall for some future use.

Note on the wiper mounted pins sent by hiperfauto: I have seen those pins before in wiper packages but never knew what they were for. My wipers that came with the Bertone had the the pin penned to the wiper blade assembly. That indicates that the wipers were original or OEM original.

My history of the Bertone from talking to the long time owner is that it had been in garage and then, literally, a hay barn since some time about 1990.
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Old 10-04-2019, 07:27 PM   #692
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Got the little lost Jeep out of my life and back to the Bertone steering rack.

The CAM rack's high pressure hose took a contorted route across to the right and then back left to the pump. The problem with the ZF rack is that the hose mounting holes are not exactly where they were on the CAM rack. That required carefully bending the very hard pressure line to meet the port without interfering with other lines and the mounting hardware.

That was very difficult but got it done . . . I think. Success will be determined by installing the rack. That may involve raising the engine for clearance.



Down to a couple weeks to Eurofest.
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Old 10-05-2019, 02:11 PM   #693
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About that saddle. I know we all strive to use the OE part but when that part becomes NLA I would think that a muffler u-clamp could be adapted to work.
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Old 10-05-2019, 02:41 PM   #694
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The saddle from a muffler clamp would come close to matching the height of the OEM one but would be pressed into the aluminum casting of the ZF rack. The original support piece is flat in the middle to mate with a flat spot on the casting.



The clamp on a CAM rack is much smaller.

With only two more extractions and installs I got the high pressure hard line out of the way of everything . . . I hope. Haven't tightened it all down.

I will have to get my able assistant and wife of many years to hold the steering wheel level while I crank in the toe. Tomorrow, tomorrow.

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Old 10-07-2019, 08:54 PM   #695
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After rotating the steering wheel left/right and centered the steering wheel began tightening down everything. Used a couple of wood clamps turned around to push rather than clamp to lock the steering wheel into level.

I began screwing the rack outside arm into the tie rod ends. Wrapped tape around the rod and marked with a pen. Counted the turns 10, then 5 and then about 2.5 turns. Got everything back to the 54 13/16" measurement between marked tape on the tire tread done earlier.

That was how I learned to align wheels about 60 years ago.

Today's automated alignment systems do this a little more effectively.

Filling the completely drained power steering reservoir, pump reservoir and rack takes a little time. Fill, start, turn and shut it down to fill everything previously empty.

Tomorrow, tomorrow.

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Old 10-08-2019, 06:56 AM   #696
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My toe method uses the tried and true mm tape measure, 4 bricks, and the open wrenches to adjust outer tie rod ends (forgot the sizes, but one is a 17mm?).

With "quality" tires and unbent front rims, roll the car back & forth in your shop (1 car length minimum). Hook the tape from your tire center rib, sitting on top of a pair of bricks; on my lowered cars this puts the tape in contact with the framework of the chassis. Read front and back sides of the tires. Continue to adjust (in opposite directions, obviously) in small increments (1/4 rotations of OTR). I always shoot for a toe IN of 1.5mm. I believe the old 2 series green book calls for a max of 2mm of toe IN.

Good luck Tom!
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Old 10-08-2019, 09:39 AM   #697
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I use a transparent (plastic) ruler, black sewing thread and jack stands. Stretch the thread between the stands and create a string line that is parallel to the side of the car -- back stand behind the rear tire; front stand in front of the front tire. Carefully measure over to the leading and trailing edge of the rear wheel and adjust the front stand so your string line is perfectly parallel to the rear wheel. Now you can set the front toe referenced to the rear. From the parallel string, measure over to the leading and trailing edge of the front wheel -- and set the toe at whatever your spec is. Buy some cheap VCT 12"x12" tiles at the local hardware store. If you're really anal, measure the floor and use the tiles under the tires to level the car before you set the toe. Place at least 2 tiles under each tire -- sprinkle liberally with table salt. The salt between the tiles acts like little bearings and allows the tire to turn easily as you make toe adjustments.

RE: the toe 'spec' mentioned above by DET -- that's a good rule of thumb for a rubber bushed front suspension. You can run even less if you're poly bushed in the front.
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Old 10-08-2019, 10:06 AM   #698
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M.H. Yount View Post
If you're really anal . . .
I'm really anal . . . all that was to get the toe in close enough to drive 10 miles to an alignment shop with $25,000 worth of laser and computer equipment.
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Old 10-08-2019, 12:58 PM   #699
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M.H. Yount View Post
I use a transparent (plastic) ruler, black sewing thread and jack stands. Stretch the thread between the stands and create a string line that is parallel to the side of the car -- back stand behind the rear tire; front stand in front of the front tire. Carefully measure over to the leading and trailing edge of the rear wheel and adjust the front stand so your string line is perfectly parallel to the rear wheel. Now you can set the front toe referenced to the rear. From the parallel string, measure over to the leading and trailing edge of the front wheel -- and set the toe at whatever your spec is. Buy some cheap VCT 12"x12" tiles at the local hardware store. If you're really anal, measure the floor and use the tiles under the tires to level the car before you set the toe. Place at least 2 tiles under each tire -- sprinkle liberally with table salt. The salt between the tiles acts like little bearings and allows the tire to turn easily as you make toe adjustments.

RE: the toe 'spec' mentioned above by DET -- that's a good rule of thumb for a rubber bushed front suspension. You can run even less if you're poly bushed in the front.
Like Michael says, the pair of floor tiles works like a champ when you are measuring camber. I have an alignment jig that allows you to measure this, and you must rotate the the steering thru a good bit of the available range. When I built my "pro touring" Chevelle suspension, I used the greased tile trick. Another low cost method is to set the car on a pair of black plastic trash bags.... the tires slide easily on 2 layers of plastic.
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Old 10-08-2019, 06:30 PM   #700
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Quote:
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I'm really anal . . . all that was to get the toe in close enough to drive 10 miles to an alignment shop with $25,000 worth of laser and computer equipment.
The $25k equipment is only as good as the millennial that's operating it. I trust myself more in the garage with $25 equipment.
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