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Old 09-17-2020, 09:35 AM   #26
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Some random links that sort of happened to fall out of my ctrl-v:

PV Bilsteins: https://www.kgtrimning.org/pvduett-1...s/sportracing/
Sway bar kit (probably IPD, but IPD doesn't list them currently): https://www.kgtrimning.org/pvduett-1...-1/6k5001.html
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Old 09-17-2020, 06:19 PM   #27
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I love that leaf spring bumper!

It might even be a useful way to absorb some kinetic energy without damaging the frame as much. Except that it's too low to be of any use against today's SUVs.
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Old 09-18-2020, 11:15 AM   #28
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Going through the distributor, points and alternator

Back in the engine compartment the distributor cap is taken off and the engine turned to top dead center (TDC.) While first rotating the engine, there is a quiet pop sound followed by muffled gurgling of liquid migrating from inside the engine. Removing the rotor, the point gap is checked and the .018 feeler gauge does not slide into the gap. The points are detached and upon inspection find there is a significant burnt area on both of the point surfaces so a new one is needed. While the rotor is out, place a few drops of oil on the center pad of the distributor to lube it. The valve cover is taken off to ensure all of the valves are moving properly and as expected.









The next job is to remove the alternator, which there are two reasons behind. The alternator is held in place with a tangle of bailing wire, electrical tape and a rubber strap because the mounting/adjuster bolt has been sheared off. Second, since the space is limited for turning the engine with a socket wrench, it will be easier with the alternator out of the way. The wiring on the back is undone and the alternator is soon sitting on the on the front fender. All looks and feels normal while rotating the engine watching the valves open and close to the periodic sound of air whooshing out of the cylinders. What is a bit alarming is noticing some wetness at the junction of the block and oil pan at the front of the engine. Coolant is slowly leaking from the front of the engine so a catch pan is placed under the engine. The valve cover is put back into place and the hood is closed as work concludes for the day.










The next day at home, work on the alternator begins by cutting a groove into the little nub sticking proud out of back side of the casing before going down the avenue of drilling it out. Using a cutting wheel on a Dremel, a channel is created to fit a bladed bit. Two bits end up breaking in my first attempt to muscle the broken bolt out. Due to the ongoing bad air quality from the California wildfires (this was on the day on the Bay Area's infamous orange sky) I was for the most part self-confined to my living room and kitchen. Knowing the mounting ear needed to be heated and quenched with penetrating oil, I turned to my gas stove. For about 15 minutes the ear containing the broken bold was situated over and next to the burner. Every couple minutes the alternator was rotated around to get both sides of the ear heated. After quenching and letting it cool down a bit, the largest screwdriver was located. After a bit of effort, the bolt began to turn while emitting a small squeak of defeat. Work subsided on the 544 for the next several day due to the toxic air hanging over California and all of the West Coast.







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Old 09-18-2020, 12:05 PM   #29
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The alternator certainly isn't original. Is it a later Volvo setup or something random stuck on there?

My PV came to me with a huge Dodge alternator of some sort stuck on it. Threaded rod through e Volvo block mount, with nuts just run along it to wherever they needed to go to sort of align the pulley.
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Old 09-18-2020, 12:09 PM   #30
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The alternator certainly isn't original. Is it a later Volvo setup or something random stuck on there?

My PV came to me with a huge Dodge alternator of some sort stuck on it. Threaded rod through e Volvo block mount, with nuts just run along it to wherever they needed to go to sort of align the pulley.
It looks like the alternator that came on my '67 122. I am thinking it is a later Volvo setup.
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Old 09-18-2020, 02:47 PM   #31
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Looks like a B20 alternator...
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Old 09-18-2020, 02:51 PM   #32
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When the B20 alternator died on my PV (it came along with the B20), it was in the middle of a road trip (driving back from MM). I decided to improve on it a bit. instead of getting another rare, low amp vintage Volvo alternator, I'd just get a SWEM bracket and got a cheap, super commonly available GM alternator. 100 amps, I paid $70 for it brand new on eBay (I'm sure it's Chinese repro junk), and now I have bright lights. If it ever goes out again I can get a replacement at pretty much every parts store in the US. Odds of finding a compatible old Volvo alternator on a weekend in Tennessee? Pretty much rounds to zero.

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Old 09-20-2020, 06:05 PM   #33
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Off topic, but John have you thought about taller stacks for your Webers ? Just so you're not pulling air quite as close to the headers as you are now ? I doubt it would make a big difference, but I'm curious to see if it would matter or not.
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Old 09-20-2020, 08:55 PM   #34
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There's not a lot of room in the PV engine bay. It narrows toward the front. There's about 3 inches of room between the front stack and the inner fender.
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Old 09-24-2020, 05:52 AM   #35
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Just before work started on the alternator, make the decision to discard the armored cable set up and order a four position ignition switch and dig up a spare Bosch coil. Work resumes on the 544 a couple days later when the Air Quality Index returns to below 50. Digging in a box of spare fasteners, a replacement bolt is located and the alternator is remounted to the engine block. The v-belt is routed around the pulleys and use a pry bar to pivot the alternator and secure into place. The wiring is reattached and the alternator is ready to provide electricity.






Located a used but not worn out set of points in my parts box and those are installed onto the distributor. Turn the engine to TDC and then gap the points to .018 with a feeler gauge. Apply some grease to the point cam and turn the engine the spread the grease as well as make sure the points are opening and closing Scrape and clean off the posts on the distributor cap as well as the end of the rotor. As I am about reinstall those is when I realize the distributor is 180 Deg out of its normal position. The mark on the top edge of the distributor is not pointing to #1 cylinder but rather towards the left back corner of the engine compartment. Looking at the ignition wires, those have been rearranged for this positioning so they are left as is for the time being.












The AC-Delco fuel pump features an integrated fuel filter under a glass dome. After trying several times to turn the wheel securing the dome down, hit it with a small blast of lubricant. Use a set of pliers to start to turn the securing wheel and while stiff at first it becomes easy to twist after a couple of turn. Removing the dome reveals a sizeable amount of varnish and gunk in the filter area. With the help of some brake cleaner, the debris is quickly vanquished and exorcised from the fuel filter and pump. After cleaning the glass dome, it is secured back into place.












Push the 544 to the garage entrance for its second date with the pressure washer. Decades of grease and grime are quickly stripped out of the engine bay and from the various parts on and under the engine. Only now can the cream color of the cross member becomes apparent. From several places, the original light brown color if the car reemerges on the firewall and the inner fender walls.



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Old 09-24-2020, 10:44 AM   #36
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The pump should have two small rubber diaphragms that suck and push the fuel through the filter and onto the carbs. They're a b*tch to replace but I would expect them to be shot if the car sat for any length of time. Might be worthwhile to grab a $40 later style pump and run that instead. Moss Motors and a couple of other suppliers have good repair kits for the glass dome fuel pumps.
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Old 09-24-2020, 10:52 AM   #37
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And I'd expect the tank to have LOTS more rust waiting to go to a filter. Probably well worth the effort of removing it and cleaning it out.
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Old 09-24-2020, 07:02 PM   #38
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And I'd expect the tank to have LOTS more rust waiting to go to a filter. Probably well worth the effort of removing it and cleaning it out.
Bill Hirsch makes an excellent chemical for that. I don't like the POR-15 stuff, lots of stories of it coming off within 1-2 years of being applied.
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Old 09-29-2020, 06:43 PM   #39
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Wiring, Ignition & Lights

With the fuel path in the engine bay cleaned out, it was back to the electrical system. One of the obvious red flags with the car was the small 25 amp fuse wrapped in aluminum foil. This was first addressed by bending the long tab and folding it over, allowing for normal-sized fuses to be utilized. Disconnecting the wires and taping them together, removed the fuse panel off the firewall and hit it with a metal brush to clean the connectors and fuse tabs. The ends of the fuses were cleaned to ensure removal any built-up oxidation as well. The fuse panel was reattached to the car and all of the wiring reconnected.








The new ignition switch arrived in meantime, work commenced removing the armored cable set up and rebuilding the ignition wiring. From my parts cache came a 1980s 240 Bosch coil & bracket and constructed a positive wire to go to the ignition switch which is normally protected by the armored cable. Going under the dash, the wires were transferred onto the back of the new switch. The positive coil wire was snaked through the firewall and secured to the ignition switch. Unscrewed the bolts holding the coil into the firewall and extracted the broken ignition assembly out. Connected the positive wire and the wires on the negative post to the coil and tachometer.








A charged battery was lifted into the engine bay and performed a preliminary check of the electricals began. Since this is a 4-position switch turned the key to the left, the accessory position to see what would occur. The red oil warning light flickered on as did the illumination light to the add-on tachometer. Checked the wire going to the oil pressure sender ensuring it was connected though the oil light still did not illuminate at all. Pulling the headlight switch the headlights illuminated though the dash lights stayed dark. Twisted the headlight switch back and forth to see if the dash light would come to life but that was not to be. Throwing the turn signal switch up, a "click - click - click" could be heard, and a faint flashing light could be seen from under the dash, but nothing illuminated from the dash indicator. That made me wonder how many of the other lights were not properly connected into the instrument cluster.








While under the dash working on the wiring I noticed the speedometer cable had been unhooked. Began the process to remove the instrument cluster, by loosening the nuts on the back side of the unit. Once those were off twisted the cluster to get it out of the dash. Using small screwdriver, removed the water temperature and gas gauges then unhooked the oil warning and illumination lights. With the cluster now out, tried rotating the speedometer input and found it completely stuck.

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Old 09-29-2020, 07:03 PM   #40
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I can donate a spare cluster to your endeavor if you just cover shipping. I have 3-4 sitting on a shelf and could part with one if you want to yank parts out of it. All of them have a functioning speedo input.
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Old 09-29-2020, 08:47 PM   #41
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I can donate a spare cluster to your endeavor if you just cover shipping. I have 3-4 sitting on a shelf and could part with one if you want to yank parts out of it. All of them have a functioning speedo input.
Thank you for offering that up, I'll PM you about it.
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Old 09-30-2020, 12:28 AM   #42
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I am following this closely. I want to thank you for the in depth updates. It is giving me some much needed motivation to move forward on my amazon.

Would you recommend ditching the armored cable and coil combo on a car if the ignition is still working fine?
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Old 09-30-2020, 01:02 AM   #43
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This isn't so much maintenance and restoration as it is automotive archaeology. I find your documentation fascinating and your work is excellent. Keep it coming.

WRT setting the points to 0.018" gap with a feeler gauge is impressive. But to be period correct shouldn't you just use a paper matchbook cover instead of a feeler gauge?
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Old 09-30-2020, 03:50 AM   #44
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Would you recommend ditching the armored cable and coil combo on a car if the ignition is still working fine?
If it is still working fine I would leave it be. The coil will eventually go out of spec/die and what I would do is at that point cut the armored cable under the dash. Splice into the positive wire in the cable and run it to a new coil. That way your keys/ignition will still work. The one thing you may need is a plate to cover the hole in the firewall after removing the coil. Some people have left the old coil in place and mounted a coil in else where along the firewall.

The reason I removed the coil/armored cable in the 544 is there was nothing left of the key tumbler and for $10 could get a replacement ignition switch from Amazon. That was the easiest route for me to get a keyed ignition as I already had a Bosch coil available to drop into the car.

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Old 09-30-2020, 11:40 AM   #45
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This isn't so much maintenance and restoration as it is automotive archaeology. I find your documentation fascinating and your work is excellent. Keep it coming.

WRT setting the points to 0.018" gap with a feeler gauge is impressive. But to be period correct shouldn't you just use a paper matchbook cover instead of a feeler gauge?
Thank you for the feedback.

From the information I have on the engine (see post #14) the gap is listed as ".016 - ".018 Though the traditional matchbox cover is about ".020, used the feeler tool to get to that slightly smaller gap. That said, I have used a matchbook before on the 1962 Jensen 1800S I owned 8 or so years ago and have one my tool bag if needed on the road.

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Old 09-30-2020, 01:41 PM   #46
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Thank you for the feedback.

From the information I have on the engine (see post #14) the gap is listed as ".016 - ".018 Though the traditional matchbox cover is about ".020, used the feeler tool to get to that slightly smaller gap. That said, I have used a matchbook before on the 1962 Jensen 1800S I owned 8 or so years ago and have one my tool bag if needed on the road.

Haha. Nice!
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Old 09-30-2020, 02:07 PM   #47
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When our customers opt to replace the stock coil, we cut the top and bottom off so we can use the empty can to install the new coil. Caution is needed when gutting the original coil as there might be hazardous materials inside so we use a dust mask.

A Greek ebayer sells an all new part for doing the same basic thing, but we don't like it for 2 reasons which are purely esthetic. The coil sits lower in comparison to the original and the part is chromed, both of which looks out of place.

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If it is still working fine I would leave it be. The coil will eventually go out of spec/die and what I would do is at that point cut the armored cable under the dash. Splice into the positive wire in the cable and run it to a new coil. That way your keys/ignition will still work. The one thing you may need is a plate to cover the hole in the firewall after removing the coil. Some people have left the old coil in place and mounted a coil in else where along the firewall.

The reason I removed the coil/armored cable in the 544 is there was nothing left of the key tumbler and for $10 could get a replacement ignition switch from Amazon. That was the easiest route for me to get a keyed ignition as I already had a Bosch coil available to drop into the car.

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Old 09-30-2020, 02:31 PM   #48
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WHen I got mine, it was the other way around - original coil still in place, but a generic aftermarket ignition switch. but the coil itself was weak, putting out really thin wispy faint blue sparks.
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Old 10-01-2020, 01:40 PM   #49
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Instrument Cluster Rehab

Later that night at the kitchen table started the process to take apart the cluster. The screws were loosened on the back of the unit then separated the chrome bezel. Attempting to turn the speedometer input again, things were still locked up. Removed the screws and took out the odometers and then the speedometer roll. Applied a couple drops of oil to the speedometer input and let that sit. Fiddling with the gear to the odometers there was no movement in those either. Detaching the two odometers and after some twisting I was able to get the odometer moving.





Using a bladed screwdriver, it took several tries to finally get that moving, At first the mechanism was pretty stiff, adding additional lube oil and continuing to turn it finally freed things up. The odometers were being persnickety as individually the odometers would work fine but when reconnected would bind up after about registering about a mile of distance. After applying more lube and readjusting it was the same situation of working for about a mile then seizing up.






Letting those things sit, cleaned the dirt and build up off of the various lenses and ports. Scrubbed the chrome bezel to bring back a good part of its shine and luster. After testing the odometers several more times, decided to unhook the trip odometer by leaving out the axle and gear powering it from the main odometer. Put the cluster back together and using a drill hooked up to an old speedometer cable, tested the set up and again it seized after about going a mile. Decided I had put enough time into working on it and decided to just keep everything assembled and leave it be for now.






Before installing the cluster back in the dash, I wanted to check the warning and illumination lights. Using a wiring diagram from a 122 I had available, deduced which bulb represented its specific warning light in the cluster. Checked each bulb to make sure it was working with a multimeter and cleaned the inside of each bulb holder with a wire brush. The temp and gas gauges were secured back into place and the wiggled the instrument cluster back into place in the dash. Plugged in the various bulbs and then tightened the bolts securing the cluster in place. Reconnected the positive battery lead and turned the key to the accessory position. This time the charging and oil lights came on shining their red and yellow glow. Pulling the light switch, the instrumentation illumination still was dormant but the purple high beam light came on when pressing on the foot switch. Flicking the turn signal stalk up, the green light activated in conjunction with the click of the relay behind the dash.






With the instrument illumination not working, rheostats this old are the first suspect thus it was time to remove the light switch assembly from the dash. After some consulting with the wiring diagram the wires dash light connector was repositioned to another tab and reinstalled the switch. Turning the key and pulling the light switch, the instrument cluster lit up in its familiar green glow. The aftermarket ignition switch, which had been dangling down under the dash, was fitted through the hole in the dash and tightened down. Now its time to crank and try to start the engine.

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Old 10-01-2020, 01:51 PM   #50
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Nice work, that old dash reminds me of my mom's 1966 red amazon, forgot how cool that rotating speedometer looks!
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