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Old 11-27-2018, 12:21 PM   #26
freevolvos
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That all they are chevy? Hell son I.would have mailed some new ones
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Old 11-27-2018, 12:28 PM   #27
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The SBC lifters are shorter, so the pushrods have to be longer. And they cost about $150 for a set of 8.
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Old 11-27-2018, 03:39 PM   #28
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New SBC lifters are cheap ( https://www.speedwaymotors.com/COMP-...ac,222092.html ) but yeah, for whatever reason, those cro-moly pushrods are the spendy part of that swap.
Those are hydraulic lifters. Volvo push rod engines use solid lifters and Isky's aren't cheap.

https://www.summitracing.com/parts/isk-202h-8

FWIW, I offered the OP an Isky push rod and lifter kit for $200. iPd gets considerably more.

https://www.ipdusa.com/products/6979...er-pushrod-kit
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Old 11-27-2018, 03:57 PM   #29
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D'oh! I knew that! Yeah, for some reason the solid lifters do cost more. Weird, you'd think they'd be simpler - no springs or seals inside them.
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Old 11-27-2018, 04:27 PM   #30
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Apparently, there was a large batch of 'bad' B20 lifters made at some point that slowly worked its way through the Volvo OEM parts supply line. They're probably all gone by now, but they left a lingering pile of anecdotes, rituals, and general F.U.D behind.
I am thinking perhaps a very large batch. When I rebuilt my 1971 B20E the lifters had serious spalling on the contact face with the cam, so Volvo 'fixed' the problem some time after 1971. For what it is worth, I have read that the replacement OEM style lifters do not suffer the same problem. But, that is Internet wisdom - for what it is worth.

As to John V.'s comments, perhaps an option if you are starting off with Volvo's later lifters and you have access to a machine shop knowledgeable about solid lifters and rockers and that kind of stuff. That is becoming an increasingly rare commodity. At $8 for a resurface job it is cheaper than a set of the lightweight lifters and matching push rods; but, not a huge saving considering the overall cost of an engine re-build. However, original style lifters are available for $7.75 (VP Auto) so the only saving is the shipping cost (compared to a local machine shop) and if you plan ahead and get parts together then perhaps no saving at all.
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Old 11-27-2018, 04:36 PM   #31
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I am thinking perhaps a very large batch. When I rebuilt my 1971 B20E the lifters had serious spalling on the contact face with the cam, so Volvo 'fixed' the problem some time after 1971. For what it is worth, I have read that the replacement OEM style lifters do not suffer the same problem. But, that is Internet wisdom - for what it is worth.

As to John V.'s comments, perhaps an option if you are starting off with Volvo's later lifters and you have access to a machine shop knowledgeable about solid lifters and rockers and that kind of stuff. That is becoming an increasingly rare commodity. At $8 for a resurface job it is cheaper than a set of the lightweight lifters and matching push rods; but, not a huge saving considering the overall cost of an engine re-build. However, original style lifters are available for $7.75 (VP Auto) so the only saving is the shipping cost (compared to a local machine shop) and if you plan ahead and get parts together then perhaps no saving at all.
VP auto? Who exactly is that? Not the notorious P who is notorious is it?
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Old 11-27-2018, 06:11 PM   #32
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Not the other notorious John of VPD. Instead, VP Autoparts

http://212.247.61.152/us/main.aspx?page=Main_FirstPage

However, if you have an aversion to anything that starts with or contains VP, CVI, Skandix, IPD, and a whole bunch of Ebay vendors sell them for $8 or less. The replacement part # is 1218630 which cross references as the replacement to # 418423 which is the original part number. Volvo even lists it as an OEM part; but, at about twice the price of everyone else and its probably a special order if you try to get it from your dealer.

I would never in good conscience direct anybody to the other notorious John.
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Old 11-27-2018, 06:37 PM   #33
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That's reasonable, and Ian, I absolutely appreciate the offer, and was very tempted.
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Old 11-27-2018, 08:44 PM   #34
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I've heard the soft lifter story in chevy land to...I wish I had the mopar .904 diameter lifter...then I could have super fast ramps.too
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Old 11-30-2018, 12:09 AM   #35
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I'm tempted to agree, but with the distributor drive gear assembled 180 out, the dizzy on this is pointing at #4 as expected.
Ah. If the drive gear is 180 out, then someone assembled the distributor incorrectly such that the drive dog on the bottom end is 180 out. Then they, or someone, reinstalled the drive gear to hide the error.

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Old 11-30-2018, 10:38 PM   #36
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How do you put the drive in after the distributor?
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Old 11-30-2018, 10:44 PM   #37
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How do you put the drive in after the distributor?
Ah! Sorry to confuse you! The distributor drive gear is actually UNDER the distributor itself, so you put it in first! :-) you probably gave yourself quite a headache trying to put it in after.

If the concept of adding notes after the instruction confused you (notes on how to install the distributor gear after instructions to install the distributor), I'm sorry, reading must be new to you! Try picking up a book some time.
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Old 11-30-2018, 11:41 PM   #38
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How do you put the drive in after the distributor?
You don't, of course. But if you overhaul a distributor and then assemble it incorrectly such that the drive cog on the bottom is 180 out, one way to hide this error is to then remove the distributor, then remove the drive gear, reinstall the drive gear 180 out to counter the already-incorrectly assembled distributor, then reinstall the distributor. The end result is that the rotor points the way it's supposed to, but there are two 180 degree errors lurking below. It's quicker and simpler to switch the drive gear than the correct the dizzy. Not correct, but quick and easy.

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Old 12-01-2018, 12:37 PM   #39
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New step: take out spark plugs and turn engine over. Apparently this is a good way to prime the fuel and get the oil spread around?
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Old 12-01-2018, 01:00 PM   #40
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I've also read here that the above 2000k rpm for 30 minutes is not necessary for our OHC engines as the cam sits in a bath of oil.
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Old 12-01-2018, 02:37 PM   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CRatcliff View Post
Ah! Sorry to confuse you! The distributor drive gear is actually UNDER the distributor itself, so you put it in first! :-) you probably gave yourself quite a headache trying to put it in after.

If the concept of adding notes after the instruction confused you (notes on how to install the distributor gear after instructions to install the distributor), I'm sorry, reading must be new to you! Try picking up a book some time.
Try being a smart-ass to someone who hasn't built engines all his life. It was a semi-rhetorical question aimed at giving the author of that post a chance to clarify, which he did.
As for reading, I teach auto tech. I read.
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Old 12-01-2018, 05:45 PM   #42
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New step: take out spark plugs and turn engine over. Apparently this is a good way to prime the fuel and get the oil spread around?
On a freshly assembled engine, I would recommend against this.

On a used engine that's being brought back into service, it won't hurt.

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Old 12-02-2018, 09:49 PM   #43
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Cool! I ended up just firing it up, and all went well (it seems!)
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