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Old 09-10-2015, 02:58 AM   #26
LloydDobler
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This thread needs an update, sadly I have nothing significant to report. But there's a few photos so that'll have to do. 10 days ago I became fully debt free, because I got a severance check from my job as they laid me off. So this sucks, I can't even celebrate or feel good because I have exactly two months cash before I dip in to credit again.

On the plus side I've already had one phone interview and I've filed unemployment which hopefully will stretch it at least another month if it comes to that.

On the car front, I removed the heater box, because it's in the way of my transmission tunnel cutting:



This will get fully disassembled and rebuilt, and I'll tuck the fan wiring in and run it out the back of the housing so it's not visible in the engine bay.



I bought polyurethane motor mounts and have been designing the mounts and brackets in my head:



I removed the ignition switch and coil, I'm basically trying to decide if this is valuable to a restorer or if I should just chop the coil off so I can use the original ignition switch, which I'd like to do.



Last, I decided instead of a full custom exhaust manifold, it'll save me a bunch of time if I just make an up-pipe from the original manifold. So with that in mind here's my mounting position again. You can see all I'll need is a couple pieces of tubing. I'll probably move the turbo a little farther down and a little closer to the fender just in case I ever want a larger one, although I doubt I will. I also popped the snap ring so I could play with clocking the cold side, it fits a lot better in there now. Once I get the car running, a winter project will be to build a full exhaust manifold.



So my next steps are to pull the motor back out, get the oil pan welded up (I'm happy with my cuts) and lay out the plates that bolt to the engine for motor mounting. Once the motor mounts are done I'll have to make a final decision about the transmission, and then I'll buy my radiator and alternator and start fitting all that in there, along with working out the intake. I found a 22 x 16 sprint car radiator that will fit just about perfect with a teeny bit of cutting on the car, designed for V8 racing so it should be more than adequate cooling. And I've found a wide variety of alternators smaller than mine so I shouldn't have trouble when that time comes.
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Old 09-10-2015, 06:39 AM   #27
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Sorry to hear you lost your job! could you do an up pipe with the stock na manifold? They do flow well..
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Old 09-23-2015, 06:21 AM   #28
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Very nice project! I specially joint turbobricks to be able to ask questions, i am planning to rebuild a p220 and with time to do the same engine swap. So my questions are, what is the name/type of the rims these are the first ones that i actually like. (In my opinion) Most of the guys install rims that are just to big or a bit tinhorn haha. And could you tell me what the current ride height is? Looks very good, not too high not to low

Thanks, Good luck!
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Old 09-23-2015, 05:25 PM   #29
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Thanks! These are Volvo Propus C wheels, made by BBS, a stock wheel on the C70 model. They're 17x7.5 with the 5x4.25 bolt pattern of the newer Volvos. Since they're front wheel drive offset I'm running them with 25mm spacers but I get a tiny bit of tire rub with 205/50 tires. I'd recommend 20mm spacers for someone who doesn't want to roll or cut the fender lips. I cut exactly 2 coils off all 4 springs, so the ride height is exactly 14 inches from wheel center to the fender lip. I used 1800E front hubs and rear axle on this car which updated the bolt pattern, but you can get adapters if you want to keep the original 122 pattern on the car.


Quote:
Originally Posted by VQ View Post
could you do an up pipe with the stock na manifold? They do flow well..
I don't think so, those drop way down under the firewall of the 850 so I don't think there's room for it.
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Old 11-25-2015, 04:24 AM   #30
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Finally have some material to update. About a month ago I did the finish grinding and made the blank plates to fill in the notches in my oil pan, and today my welder friend finally had time to help me out, and welded them all together.

Initial fixturing:



First side done:



Passenger side done: The extra beads across the top were my fault due to a terrible jigsaw that wandered.



Overall photo:



And long term leak testing, passed beautifully (It's full of water in case you can't easily see it):



With that done, I also stuck the dipstick in the hole and the pan capacity to full on the dipstick is 6 quarts, which should be about perfect for the 5 cylinder motor.

Other than that, I did procure an M90 transmission out of the UK which hasn't arrived yet, but that makes me very happy. Shouldn't have spent the money while unemployed but meh, who cares. It's a necessary next step. I also have designed all the motor mounts, turbo flanges, and intake adapter flanges so that I can have them waterjet cut. I'm just waiting for some quotes.

Next up, once I get my flanges I'll actually drop the crossmember out of the car again so I can take it over to my friend's shop, and we can weld up the motor mounts using the pan and bearing girdle rather than the whole motor. Should work out great. I'm just going to use aluminum tubing and gusset it.

And, I've been researching radiators and alternators, and I think I've found exactly what I need. Also Andrewnance has found the perfect fuel pump system that is designed to convert old cars to modern high pressure delivery and return, with a baffle built in and everything. So that should be taken care of outside of filtering and lines. And it's designed to bolt in to old school fuel tanks. http://www.summitracing.com/parts/aei-18688

So now that I look at it, my goal of June 2016 will probably not be hit unless I get a job before the end of the year. On the other hand I'm already halfway to "screw it" and paying for everything on a credit card just to make progress, so there's that.
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Old 12-10-2015, 04:54 AM   #31
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Had a hard time deciding whether to post an update, because I'll have another one in a couple days I think. But I have some cool pictures worth sharing so why not.

Waterjet parts!



Throttle body flange, I made the hole the same size as the gasket, assuming that the larger throttle body is that size, in case I use it instead.



Manifold flange, pretty much perfect.



Exhaust manifold to turbo flange, I got two of these to make my up-pipe.



I didn't design it this way, but the tubing I've chosen for the up-pipe actually fits right in to the hole and wedges in place. It'll need a little porting.



Downpipe flange, I messed up and forgot to enlarge the holes after using the measurements from stud to stud to locate the holes. The hole locations are perfect and it almost fits, I'll just have to chase it with a slightly larger drill.



Driver's side motor mount flange, all the bolt holes and clearances fit! I made it extra large just because, once everything's finished I may just cut the rear half of it off.



I'll need a 6mm spacer for the upper bolts, I'll either use purchased spacers (like washers) or buy some 6mm strip and drill it. Either way, easy fix.



I added this chunk of material to attach my alternator mount. I figured I'd roll it in with the same part to increase the overall strength and save on part count. I'll still have to adapt something though, once I buy my alternator.



On the passenger side, there were two machined bosses that weren't tapped. But the hole that was cast in to them was the exact size of the predrill. So I tapped them as is. Mmmm.. precision.



Fresh threads!



And again, all locations are right.



I made this side extra huge because all the different generations of this motor have different bolt patterns on this side. Case in point:



Ah. This lower engine girdle is from a '94, my engine is a '98, and I have a 2000 motor sitting on a pallet at my old job and its holes are completely different as well. I doubt I'll use this engine forever, as newer ones have updated internals that I'll need if I want to make more power. So all this extra material will allow me to just drill more holes and use it depending on what engine I bolt it to. Starting with one new hole right away, as I'll be using this girdle to fixture for the engine mount welds.



Cutting it a little close on the turbo drain, I might have to knock the corner off this plate for clearance if I tap this hole for a threaded fitting or anything. I probably will tap it because that makes it easier to use flexible line on the oil return.



So there we go, tomorrow I'm going to drop the engine back in the car and play with fits and dial in the final location, and nail down the up-pipe design, while playing with the throttle body to see if I can make progress there. Then on Friday I'll go to my old job to use their machine shop, where I hope to do final fly-cut on the oil pan for flatness, and machine recesses in the turbo flanges. They all have a shallow depression to sort of help seal them from exhaust leaks I guess. Can't really think of any other reason they'd be in there. Plus I can chase the mounting holes using a proper setup rather than trying to do it by hand. Stainless is not fun to drill.
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Old 12-10-2015, 06:16 PM   #32
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its nice to see new work in this project!
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Old 12-11-2015, 05:47 PM   #33
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Thats a good start for the engine mounts. What kind of engine mounts/bushings are you plan to use?
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Old 12-12-2015, 02:20 AM   #34
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For now, just generic round poly bushings, I figure if they're too hard I'll slot them or drill softening holes in them. I have a plan to just weld flat plates to the crossmember to mount them in.

Today I machined my extra oil pan, I somehow didn't realize it was less warped than the one I decided to use. I only had to take .030" off the middle, with just a few thousandths cleanup passes on the rest of the pan. I figured out a decent way to fixture it, I bought these little machine jacks and just put them on the flat bolt hole faces, there were many to choose from on both ends. Crank them up and down with a dial indicator and I had all 4 corners zeroed in perfectly in about 10 minutes. And the ends of the pan are thick/tall enough that clamping in the center like I did didn't deflect the surface down at all.



Unfortunately, fly cutting it really shakes the pan and rings out throughout the shop, so I had to limit the depth to under .005" per pass to get good finish and not annoy the people I used to work with. So while it was easy work, it was very time consuming. Four hours later:



Then I used the lathe to put clearances in my exhaust flanges, and chase out the holes. They all mate up to their respective parts perfectly now.



Because of how time consuming it was to mill the oil pan, and given that mine is only warped about .040 in the middle, I think I'll skip machining it for now. I mean, on the one hand it's warped, but with a single bolt hand tight, it flexes back into place. So with the anaerobic gasket I have a hard time believing it won't seal. Although I just did some searching and I can get a 1.5" endmill for about $35 so maybe that's the answer for next time.
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Old 12-12-2015, 03:47 AM   #35
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Are you welding the throttle body flange to the intake or does that bolt on?
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Old 12-13-2015, 03:09 AM   #36
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I bought a flange that bolts to the intake, and a flange for the throttle body, and I'll be welding a short radius elbow between them to get the throttle body pointed forward. I'll also weld a bung on to the elbow for the idle control motor.
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Old 12-14-2015, 10:22 AM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LloydDobler View Post
I bought a flange that bolts to the intake, and a flange for the throttle body, and I'll be welding a short radius elbow between them to get the throttle body pointed forward. I'll also weld a bung on to the elbow for the idle control motor.
I've thought about doing the same for mine. Seems like it would make it much easier to route everything.
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Old 12-15-2015, 05:50 PM   #38
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Tip of the day: A better method than water to check for leaks in things like your oil pan is to add some red food coloring to rubbing alcohol. Alcohol is less viscous than water and the red color will show you exactly where the leak is. You don't have to fill the void area either, just a small amount of red sloshed over all the interior welds will do the trick. You can just poor the excess red back in the bottle for later use.
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Old 12-19-2015, 02:11 AM   #39
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That sounds like a great idea, thanks! I'll keep that in the toolbox for next time.

So tonight a 3 month saga of shipping and idiot fedex decisions comes to a close. Behold! The irreplaceable M90!



With starter adapter



And a few peripherals.



They basically lost the paperwork, and instead of calling either myself or the seller, they just sent it back to the UK and tried to bill us for the trip. Fortunately the seller (classicswede here on the forums) was having none of it and eventually persuaded them to ship it to me again on their dime. But it was hairy for a while, we didn't know if they'd budge or not.

I wish I'd have asked for the whole driveshaft but it's not a dealbreaker, at some point I'll just junkyard up a rear driveshaft half from another 9 series. I'll have to shorten or lengthen them to custom specs anyway.

This week was too cold to get out into the garage, we got about 8 inches of snow on tuesday and then it just sat around at 20 degrees. Today was nice but I was busy with other stuff, and this weekend is booked. I'll get around to doing some more real work at some point next week.
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Old 12-19-2015, 05:53 PM   #40
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At last it has arrived! It did take a lot of effort making them come good with delivery.

I have been considering doing a 2.5NA swap for a while and I like how you have tackled some of the problems. The NA engine will provide neater packaging and still make enough power for a daily.

What are you thinking of doing for the speedo drive?
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Old 12-19-2015, 08:11 PM   #41
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Nice build, that color looks great on an Amazon! Wish I were closer, I'd snatch that b18 drive train and all to build and swap into my Amazon!
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Old 12-19-2015, 11:56 PM   #42
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Quote:
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What are you thinking of doing for the speedo drive?
I have a friend who's an EE and we've talked about converting it to electric drive with the speed controlled by an ABS sensor and a tone ring mounted to the output shaft of the transmission, using the driveshaft bolts. We've already sourced the motor and I've designed the adapter. I've also confirmed that the motor gives a linear speed output with voltage. Then it's just a simple box to convert the pulse input to voltage output, with a calibration button of some kind. Should be cool, I really want to keep the original speedo.
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Old 12-20-2015, 11:14 PM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LloydDobler View Post
I have a friend who's an EE and we've talked about converting it to electric drive with the speed controlled by an ABS sensor and a tone ring mounted to the output shaft of the transmission, using the driveshaft bolts. We've already sourced the motor and I've designed the adapter. I've also confirmed that the motor gives a linear speed output with voltage. Then it's just a simple box to convert the pulse input to voltage output, with a calibration button of some kind. Should be cool, I really want to keep the original speedo.

Are you thinking of driving the speedo shaft with the motor? It might be simpler to take the feedback from the tone ring and control the speedo with a stepper motor. This would be a pretty simple application for an arduino controller. Hardest part would be driving the speedo wheel. I haven't seen what they look like on the inside but a basic o-ring friction belt drive could be simple to implement.
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Old 12-21-2015, 03:52 AM   #44
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I wanted to do a stepper and just direct drive the ribbon drum but that would still leave the odometer non functional. Or do you mean running the stepper at a given RPM? In the end I'm not the EE so I'm leaving that to my buddy. Even if there's some deviations here and there it'll probably be just as accurate as an old worn out speedo system anyway. And I'll be pulling apart the assembly and doing a full grease-it-up restoration to make sure it's as smooth as it can be. I'll actually be using the odometer to calibrate it, and then adjust the speedo drum to match. It is adjustable, only it has to be done with the whole thing disassembled. There's a non-contact magnet drive on one end, and a really light brass clock spring on the other end, which can be tightened or loosened. The odometer is direct gear driven by the cable input.
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Old 12-21-2015, 10:13 AM   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LloydDobler View Post
I wanted to do a stepper and just direct drive the ribbon drum but that would still leave the odometer non functional. Or do you mean running the stepper at a given RPM? In the end I'm not the EE so I'm leaving that to my buddy. Even if there's some deviations here and there it'll probably be just as accurate as an old worn out speedo system anyway. And I'll be pulling apart the assembly and doing a full grease-it-up restoration to make sure it's as smooth as it can be. I'll actually be using the odometer to calibrate it, and then adjust the speedo drum to match. It is adjustable, only it has to be done with the whole thing disassembled. There's a non-contact magnet drive on one end, and a really light brass clock spring on the other end, which can be tightened or loosened. The odometer is direct gear driven by the cable input.
Forgot about the odo, that would complicate things. A motor running at speed would kill two birds with one stone.
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Old 12-21-2015, 06:35 PM   #46
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I should imagine building something like this

http://www.abbott-tach.com/cablex.htm
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Old 12-22-2015, 02:42 AM   #47
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Basically, except ours would be open loop instead of closed, it'll only go out of calibration as things wear or get sticky, and because of that it'll only cost about $20 plus our labor instead of $339. I will tell my friend I can buy one for $339 and see what he says.
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Old 12-22-2015, 06:08 AM   #48
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If they can be built cheaply I'm sure there would be a lot of interest
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Old 12-23-2015, 01:15 AM   #49
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My friend said we'd have hours and hours of labor in it so if it's one off, I'm better off buying the one you linked! hehe. The one we build would be specific to 122s anyway, not a ton of market.
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Old 02-13-2016, 08:53 AM   #50
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I was waiting to update this thread until I got some actual welding done on the intake and exhaust but my welding buddy has been very busy and I won't get anything done for a few more weeks anyway. Also I've been really unmotivated due to my unemployment. You'd think it'd be the opposite, right? Except everywhere I turn I feel like I need to spend some money to make progress. There are like 3 things I can do without spending money, but it all seems pointless because when I'm done I hit the wall of needing to spend the money. Anyway, it's just a hangup and I've still made some slow progress. Also there are some job prospects on the horizon, we'll see.

First I bolted the pan back on and put the motor back in to verify clearances. So far so good:







Then I used some of this perforated strip material that I had laying around to fixture my turbo flange. It's surprisingly easy to manipulate while being more than rigid enough to hold it where I want it.



Up-pipe clearances look good, I'll need a little more than a 45 down here though.



Here the turbo hotside is resting about an inch forward of its actual position so I can clear the studs in it, but otherwise its relation to the head is correct.



Looks about right



And the cold side just hanging in space, rotated about where I want it, should be just about perfect with room to grow into a slightly larger turbo if I ever get the lust for more.



I also obtained a 3 inch throttle body from the 6 cylinder motor. I should have grabbed this when I stripped a motor last year. I may not like this as the goal is to increase throttle response. With such a light car I may have trouble feathering the throttle. Also 3 inch intake tubing may not really fit in my engine bay. But I have it if I want it, and it's a direct swap with the smaller one.



I was correct in assuming the gasket hole size was the bore size.



I bought a tight radius elbow:



Then I cut it down to be even tighter. I tried to get a picture mounted on the motor but I can't hold all the pieces with one hand and work the camera. I'm still up in the air on the orientation of this so I'm going to tack it together to try a few things before making any final decisions.



I also obtained the illustrious R manifold (on delayed payment from a friend) but ironically I've been hearing that it changes the way the engine sounds compared to the older manifolds. So right when I get one all of a sudden people are talking that this is a less popular manifold to use. So now I'm thinking I'd rather use the older manifold, I absolutely love the growl I get out of my C70, and the japanifold is known to flow well and make more than enough power. Of course in the long run I'm going to have a custom tubular manifold so really it's kind of irrelevant.



Those are the updates for now, I'm going to fly to Oregon and visit my dad next week, more updates when I get back and get some welding done.
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