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Old 11-15-2017, 10:35 PM   #26
Tfrasca
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shaved240 View Post
my Aeromotive FPR never holds any pressure when the car is off. Always thought that was kind of odd.
Yeah, I'm calling BS on their claim that it's better for performance. This is what their FAQ says about it:

6.) I’ve installed my new Aeromotive bypass regulator. Fuel pressure seems to adjust fine and holds great when the engine is running, but when I shut the engine off, pressure drops quickly to zero. Shouldn’t the pressure hold like it did with a stock regulator?
No, Aeromotive EFI bypass regulators may not seal perfectly when the pump is off. They are engineered for the highest possible performance when the engine is running. OEM regulators must hold pressure for 30-minutes after shut-down to pass EPA emissions standards. At Aeromotive we know our customers priority is to have the best possible flow and pressure control when the engine is running and we don’t compromise this standard to force the regulator to seal when the engine is off. If extended crank or hard-start becomes a concern, first allow the pump to run and prime as long as possible after turning the key to the run position, then start cranking the engine, just before the pump shuts off. If the priming cycle is too short to allow the engine to start easily with this approach, extend the priming cycle in the ECU if programmable, or ad a timer board or momentary button to the fuel pump run circuit.
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Old 11-16-2017, 03:05 AM   #27
gross polluter
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To be fair, an OEM regulator is usually a small needle or tapered metering orifice that seals quite well since it's small and has a considerable amount of surface area to seal against. Great for holding pressure when the pump isn't running, but horrible for bypass flow. This works great for OEM applications and fuel systems with low overall flow and delivery volume.

The ball and seat style like commonly found on aftermarket regulators aren't so great for holding pressure when the pump is off because the sealing area is considerably less, in exchange for a greater return orifice size.

I'm not quite sure I've ever seen an aftermarket regulator that holds pressure for a significant amount of time after the pump is shut off.

Not saying that the construction on yours isn't poor, because it's Aeromotive and they don't make super high quality stuff to begin with. But, I don't think it's rational to expect them to hold pressure for a long time after turning the pump off either.

Thinking about it, the only thing Aeromotive I've personally have dealt with in the past twenty years that's been worth its own weight are the Stealth A340 pumps. Their A1000 pumps are complete garbage, and sort of set the tone of the crap quality they produce.

My own preference is the super cheap (well, back when they were $89) Mallory 29389. Of the 30 I've installed, none of them came back for any sort of failure, the oldest one being in my rustang for the past 15 years. Average pressure decay is around 20 seconds after turning the pump off. Something that's about average for an aftermarket ball and seat regulator.

Aside from proper operation, I wouldn't expect an aftermarket high flow regulator to hold pressure after the engine is shut off. That's the primary concern Aeromotive is addressing in their FAQ.
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Old 11-16-2017, 03:05 AM   #28
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To be fair, an OEM regulator is usually a small needle or tapered metering orifice that seals quite well since it's small and has a considerable amount of surface area to seal against. Great for holding pressure when the pump isn't running, but horrible for bypass flow. This works great for OEM applications and fuel systems with low overall flow and delivery volume.

The ball and seat style like commonly found on aftermarket regulators aren't so great for holding pressure when the pump is off because the sealing area is considerably less, in exchange for a greater return orifice size.

I'm not quite sure I've ever seen an aftermarket regulator that holds pressure for a significant amount of time after the pump is shut off.

Not saying that the construction on yours isn't poor, because it's Aeromotive and they don't make super high quality stuff to begin with. But, I don't think it's rational to expect them to hold pressure for a long time after turning the pump off either.

Thinking about it, the only thing Aeromotive I've personally have dealt with in the past twenty years that's been worth its own weight are the Stealth A340 pumps. Their A1000 pumps are complete garbage, and sort of set the tone of the crap quality they produce.

My own preference is the super cheap (well, back when they were $89) Mallory 29389. Of the 30 I've installed, none of them came back for any sort of failure, the oldest one being in my rustang for the past 15 years. Average pressure decay is around 20 seconds after turning the pump off. Something that's about average for an aftermarket ball and seat regulator.

Aside from proper operation, I wouldn't expect an aftermarket high flow regulator to hold pressure after the engine is shut off. That's the primary concern Aeromotive is addressing in their FAQ.
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Old 11-16-2017, 08:09 AM   #29
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"high flow" regulator... all marketing.

A stock 850 3 bar regulator is fine with a 340lph pump, in fact, even a 3/16 hole will flow at least 206lph and possibly way more.
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Old 11-16-2017, 06:41 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tryingbe View Post
A stock 850 3 bar regulator is fine with a 340lph pump, in fact, even a 3/16 hole will flow at least 206lph and possibly way more.
I have not found this to be true, because as you pointed out, an orifice that can’t flow beyond pump capacity will increase pressure until the pump volume drops, or the orifice can sustain flow. Every 3 bar Volvo regulator I’ve had on the bench with an A340 pump would rise to 50-52 psi at low demand (idle and cruising) and would not fall into the rated pressure of the regulator until more considerable demands. The higher rated flow of fuel pump, the worse this gets.

Last edited by gross polluter; 11-16-2017 at 06:51 PM..
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