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Old 07-02-2018, 01:53 PM   #26
DocterHow
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Thanks for the suggestion, but I will try to grind a little off the header first as I want to keep a collapsible steering column.
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Old 07-02-2018, 01:59 PM   #27
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That isn't a collapsible column, it's just there to add a little NVH cushioning.

The collapsing part is from the breakable aluminum u-joint s and the out-of-alignment angles on the shaft.

That's my take on it after looking at it, at least.
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Old 07-02-2018, 02:04 PM   #28
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Thanks for the suggestion, but I will try to grind a little off the header first as I want to keep a collapsible steering column.
This has been covered in a few thread's, but that is an NVH mitigation piece. The collapsible part is further up. But understand. I left mine as from the factory.
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Old 07-02-2018, 02:04 PM   #29
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look under the dashboard. That's where you'll find the collapsible part.
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Old 07-02-2018, 05:11 PM   #30
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Thanks for the suggestion, but I will try to grind a little off the header first as I want to keep a collapsible steering column.
Don't bother. I tried that at first and and realized that if grinder any farther then I did I would of grinded all the way through. I ended up moving the steering rack over to the drivers side an inch then I bought that column and all is good.
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Old 07-02-2018, 05:42 PM   #31
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After taking another look at where the shaft is touching, I just went ahead and ordered the Coleman Racing steering shaft. Thanks to all of you who recommended that piece, and informed me that the OEM shaft is not the collapsible piece.
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Old 07-05-2018, 04:03 PM   #32
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Progress has been slow the past few days due to heat and humidity. But, I got the dash pulled out and all of the engine bay wiring was pulled through the firewall. I need to go through the wiring and strip out all of the engine related stuff. I'll probably add a connector to the under dash wiring for main power and switched ignition to the LS ecu.



When I got the dash out, I found out why my windshield wipers didn't work on the car, a previous owner removed the passenger side cam and linkage arm.



This heat has made my dad and I consider sticking modern AC into the car, so we ordered a vintage air kit (Gen 2 Compac) to replace the factory heater/ac/blower motor. The unit is almost the exact same size as the Classic Auto Air unit that a few other V8 swaps have used, but is cheaper. Also got a JEGS radiator, Energy Suspension trans mount, and a few other miscellaneous parts ordered.
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Old 07-08-2018, 09:37 PM   #33
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Another dash/wiring update: The blower motor/heater core is out, and the removal of all the extra wiring is 99% complete.



I have removed the AC/blower motor relay, overdrive relay, clutch fan relay, fuel pump relay, ecu connectors, constant idle test connectors, and a bunch of wires for them. I also removed the 2 fuses for the fuel pumps and the fuse for the blower motor, as these will be replaced with new fuses and relays. The only thing I still need to figure out after looking through wiring diagrams, is a pinout of this grey 8 pin connector shown below. This is one of the two firewall connectors to the engine (the other of which was connected entirely to the ecu connectors). I found a pinout for a later model 240, but the wire colors are different. If anyone can help, that would be much appreciated.

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Old 07-08-2018, 10:21 PM   #34
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http://www.volvowiringdiagrams.com/v...20Diagrams.pdf

That's for the '82 model year. I found a plug on the diagrams, page 13 if it's a b23e, that looks like it might be it, assuming it was in the engine bay and near the center top of the firewall.
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Old 07-08-2018, 10:38 PM   #35
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http://www.volvowiringdiagrams.com/v...20Diagrams.pdf

That's for the '82 model year. I found a plug on the diagrams, page 13 if it's a b23e, that looks like it might be it, assuming it was in the engine bay and near the center top of the firewall.
That's definitely the right plug, but my car originally had a b21f in it. I've been basing most of my wiring off that manual you linked, and I can't find that plug on the b21f wiring.
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Old 07-09-2018, 09:25 AM   #36
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That's definitely the right plug, but my car originally had a b21f in it. I've been basing most of my wiring off that manual you linked, and I can't find that plug on the b21f wiring.
My gut tells me that plug is for the gauges and such, should be wiring for the alt exciter wiring, and the oil pressure sensor?
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Old 07-15-2018, 07:22 PM   #37
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I finally got the transmission to bolt into the car, as it was previously sitting on a jackstand. To get the trans bolted in, I modified the factory cross member. The center section was cut out and 2 pieces of angled steel were welded in. Sandwiched between the cross member and the transmission is an Energy Suspension 3.1108G trans mount. Now, I just need to clean up the welds and send the cross member off to get powder coated.



Once that was squared away, I could pull the engine and transmission out and get to work on the engine bay. The first task was to clean up the battery tray, but the more I wire wheeled the tray, the more rust I found. I cut out the worst of it and will need to work on patching it back up. I also had my dad weld in a few bolt holes that are no longer necessary.



Due to unforeseen rust, I picked up a trunk mount battery kit. A 200 amp fuse, terminal covers, and a new distribution block were added to complement the kit.



I decided to mount the battery in the passenger side "butt cheek". 4 rivnuts were added along with a pair of steel L brackets to support the battery.



I mounted the fuse on the plastic filler neck cover and added a wire post-fuse for the fuel pump relay that I will move to the trunk. The rest of the cable was run through a hole in the bottom side of the trunk/back seat divider.



I had to enlarge the hole a little so I could add a rubber grommet to protect the wire.



I need a new battery as the current battery is a non-vented, wet cell battery. Also, my trunk mount isn't NHRA legal because I do not have a cut off switch.
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Old 07-16-2018, 09:28 PM   #38
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DocHow - I've got an 82 with an LS3 in it, Classic Auto Air A/C, battery in the passenger side butt cheek, manual transmission. I've got all the idiot lights and gauges working correctly - using the Lamda Sond light as the CEL. Completed it in the fall of '16. If I can help reach out to me via PM.

Confirm - the steering shaft is rubberized for NVH reduction - the rack is solid mounted so they had to have something to reduce noise/vibration. My car had a Ford 5.0L in it for 19 years prior to the LS. That gray 8-wire plug on mine had only 4 of the 8 slots with wire in them on the engine/Ford side of that plug...on the chassis/Volvo side my notes on wire color match your picture above perfectly. I did away with that plug completely during this swap and re-wired everything directly.

The 4 slots that were connected to something on mine matched up this way --- the yellow wire with blue stripe went to the Ford starter relay trigger connection...this fired the starter over when the ignition switch was turned to 'start'. The black wire went to the idiot light side of the oil pressure sender/sensor. The yellow wire went to the Volvo coolant temp gauge sender. The red wire went to one of the pins on the alternator -- I believe it was connected to the alternator light in the car and used to energize the alt on startup - but I never confirmed that as I had to completely alter that circuit to get a working alt light with the LS3/E38 ecu.

Keep in mind - since mine had a 5.0L in it before the LS, it's possible that those wire colors I identified above had been moved around. But since your plug matched up wire color-wise with mine, perhaps nobody moved anything on mine. On mine the other 3 wires - blue, green and orange/brown (was hard to tell the color on mine) weren't connected to anything on the engine side of the plug, so I removed them as a part of this conversion. I did a TON of wire tracing as part of the conversion -- the original Volvo ECU was still on the passenger side along with the Mustang computer. I removed every wire that wasn't connected to something. Did most of my tracing with a small 9V battery (think smoke detector) and a 12V test light. Plenty of juice to confirm continuity but not enough to hurt anything if I put voltage to something that was grounded or didn't react well to 12V+ from a big battery.

Hope that helps.
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Old 07-17-2018, 11:32 PM   #39
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Curious to see your solution for your shifter situation.
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Old 07-20-2018, 05:36 PM   #40
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Curious to see your solution for your shifter situation.
I posted in JohnMC's "YASVT" thread about building something like this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cwh3S8SDnVg
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Old 07-20-2018, 05:37 PM   #41
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As shown in the last update, I had to cut out some pretty rusty metal from under the battery box. After building a patch panel, the surrounding metal was still pretty rusted and wouldn't weld. i had to cut out more surrounding metal and make a larger patch panel. The metal closer to the inner side of the car isn't perfect, but it welded nicely.



I then had my Dad grind the patch down and apply some filler. He used to do bodywork, and I think he did a pretty good job.



Then, I marked out all of the other holes I wanted to fill in the engine bay and got to work welding them shut. The only holes I kept are for mounting the washer bottle, overflow tank, and hood release cable. I also moved the engine ground strap from the passenger side to driver's side of the firewall.



After some sanding and removal of a few pieces, the engine bay is ready for paint.
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Old 07-29-2018, 12:34 AM   #42
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Yet another update:

After seeing the trouble JohnMC has had getting a plate mount shifter, I decided to make my own. However, I'm a goober and lost the Nissan shifter linkage... So, this is what I came up with in prototype form.



A real 5/8" ID u-joint is surprisingly expensive. So, the next best thing was done, hacking up a cheap 1/2 drive socket wobble extension. I cut the ends off and drilled one end out to be 5/8" (the diameter of the shifter fork). Welded to the wobble is a steel L-bracket, and a cross drilled mount for the oem Volvo shifter. I can also use the factory reverse lockout by flipping the white plastic bit to the other side along with the adjustable plate (the CD009 has reverse on bottom right). The only problem with this solution is when the transmission fork is fully extended (in 2,4,6 or R gear) the clearance from the shift fork to end of shifter turret is ~3/4". Luckily, I can safely cut 1" off the end of the shifter fork, and roll-pin, nut & bolt or weld the wobble to the fork.

Next major decision is to not paint the engine bay until all of the wiring, fittings, hoses, etc is done. So, the engine/trans went back in and some of the clearance issues were solved.

The radiator from JEGS was test fitted using an old lever cap, and it just barely clears the hood. The stock rubber mounts on the bottom needed to be cut down vertically for hood clearance and the uppers need new brackets, but it fits good. This radiator (JEGS 555-52000) is basically a cheaper version of the Northern radiator Hackster used in his LSA powered 242.



As mentioned before in the thread, flathoods are cool, so I picked one up. However, without chopping and copious use of JB weld, a truck intake won't fit under a flat hood. After some shopping around I picked up a LS1 intake with factory EGR delete from an Australian Holden Commodore. It came with billet fuel rails, 42lb injectors, and an adjustable FPR I'm not going to use. I gave it a quick clean, fresh coat of paint, and added a -8 ORB cap and -8 ORB to -6AN fitting on the end of the rails. Unfortunately, I already bought all -6AN line and fittings before I bought this and I don't want to return all of the stuff to go -8AN.



If you are keen-eyed in that last photo, the power steering/alternator setup was changed as well. The alternator just barely cleared a coffin hood, so I'm sure a flathood won't fit truck accessories, which are ugly anyway. I swapped to a LS1 power steering pump with ICT billet relocation brackets. I'm still waiting on a new pulley for the pump, the truck pulley is only half way on when lined up with the belt spacing, which could spell disaster.



If you are super mega keen-eyed, the above photo shows the new Sanden AC compressor from my Vintage Air kit. I spec'd out a kit with everything I need from an eBay seller for considerably less than piecing together a kit on Summit/JEGS. The kit came with the Alan Grove low mount compressor brackets. The bracket annoyingly comes with all hardware, a new belt and new GM belt tensioner, but is in raw steel. The Sanden pulley does have 10 ribs, but the belt lines up to use the inner 4 ribs of the truck balancer.



Here's the heart of the modern AC, a Vintage Air Gen 2 Compac



I followed Dave Barton's install of a Classic Auto Air as this unit is almost the exact same size. My Dad fabbed up some steel brackets with new rivnuts on the trans tunnel and reused one of the factory hang mounts. As you can see, the unit will stick out into the passenger foot well a couple inches, but it'll look clean.





I left plenty of room for the condensation drain and ran some of the supplied hose into part of the factory drain hose.



The glovebox clearance is pretty good, just needs a small trim on the corner of the fan cover.



Lastly, I found a spot to hide the headlight step relay under the dash area. I used a of couple self tappers and shortened the harness using heatshrinked butt connectors. I plan on running the headlight wiring inside the fenders and adding new headlight relays for maximum voltage/brightness.

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Old 08-04-2018, 11:05 PM   #43
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This past week has been a lot of tidying up on the wiring and making a plan for where all of the wires need to be routed to be "tucked". I didn't take any pictures of this stuff as it's pretty boring, and it's still in progress. As mentioned in the previous post, I ordered a Dorman 300-202 power steering pulley, and Russell 648070 & 648070 power steering fittings. One fittings goes into the LS1 pump and the other on the steering rack to convert the high pressure line to a -6AN. I doubled up on some crush washers for the fitting on the rack as the O-ring on the fitting wasn't as snug feeling as the pump fitting. Since the pulley is a smaller diameter, I'm gonna install a power steering cooler while i'm at it.





The main pain this past week has been getting the fuel system done. The fuel level gauge never worked when I acquired the car, I hoped it was the gauge, but it wasn't. The sending unit has no resistance, and the board looked like there was little to no contact pins left on it. I'm surprised as it was the original Volvo/VDO sending unit, so I ordered a new sending unit. I then attempted to weld AN fittings to the new unit for the feed and return line, but it was very ugly and no matter how much I welded, it leaked.



As you can see, I used a MIG welder. A TIG or braze/solder probably would've worked better, but I don't have one and I also melted through the electrical connector accidentally. I did some research and found that MH Yount used an almost identical fuel system to the one I planned, and he had the perfect solution for the sending unit. Here's the final product:







To start, I went to a local speed shop and picked up 2 -6AN 90 degree bulkhead fittings and -6AN Tube nuts. Then, another trip to a parts store for some 3/8" steel fuel line. I cut the booger welded barbs off the top, and removed the vent and feed tube. I kept the return tube as it has the fuel sender mounted on it, but cut it shorter to make room for the Deatschwerks DW200 (255lph) Fuel pump i'm using. I drilled out the factory feed spot as well as the spot for the original electrical connector for the new feed/return fittings. The factory capped vent tube was repurposed for the ground wire pass through. On either side of the ground pass through I drilled 2 more holes for the pump power and fuel level. The original return hole was welded shut.



I then had to make the wire pass through connections fuel tight and prevent accidental grounding with the plate. So, a bolt was stuck through the plate, with a small O ring on the bolt threads to isolate the bolt from the plate. Then, a bonded seal/washer on either side of the plate was added, and they were "clearanced" to make sure no arcing or any electrical problems would occur. After I took this picture, I added some fuel safe JB Weld to the back side of each pass through as extra insurance. As a side note, I did need to bend the fuel level sender a little to make install easier, as it sticks out to one side a bit. Here it is installed, with -6AN lines running to the next part of the fuel system, and the dedicated fused relay with power coming directly after the main battery fuse in the trunk.





The next part of the fuel system is this, a Corvette fuel filter/regulator combo unit with the quick connect to AN adapters. I mounted this in lieu of the factory main fuel pump under the car. I also removed the factory hardlines and ran a single -6AN braided line to the fuel rail from the filter/regulator. Then, 2 short lines from the filter/regulator to the newly modified sending unit.



(edit forgot to add underside pic and fuel rail connection)




Last edited by DocterHow; 08-05-2018 at 10:11 PM.. Reason: added pictures
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Old 08-05-2018, 09:42 PM   #44
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are you using truck/camaro or LS spacing on your accessories?
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Old 08-05-2018, 10:08 PM   #45
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are you using truck/camaro or LS spacing on your accessories?
Truck spacing
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Old 08-07-2018, 01:12 PM   #46
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I have the body wiring tuck 95% done, just need to sort out the electric fan wiring, but more on that later (see end of post).

I wanted to run the wires for the headlights, turn signals, horn, washer motor, etc behind the fenders for that clean tucked look. So, I drilled a hole through the car from the outside roughly where I wanted the wire bundle to pass through. However, I found out that the stamped half circle like sections on the inside and outside panels of the car do not line up with each other (FYI), but it worked out in the end. To keep the holes water tight a rubber grommet was glued in place with silicone on each of the 2 panels. To hold the wire bundle I used rubber isolated clamps connected by 2 self tappers towards the back, and 2 welded on bolts/nuts in the front.



Since I relocated the step relay and i'm converting to single round headlights, I wanted to add new low/high beam relays. I found a $20 headlight relay kit with ceramic H4 plugs off amazon intended for Jeeps that also use 7" round headlights. It works perfect, but I replaced the fuse holder with a waterproof one. The relays are mounted on the frame rail next to where the charcoal canister goes. I should add that I ran 10 gauge wire in the loom bundle to power the lights, and another 10 gauge wire in the passenger side loom.



The wires are routed through some factory holes on the lower panel, with the horn wiring being tied into the passenger side headlight run. The connector for the turn signal is also split off the main loom and rests at the top of the rightmost hole.





The same routing was replicated on the passenger side, but an extra hole was drilled for a windshield washer bottle relocation.





The washer bottle is another cheap amazon purchase. The bottle is held on by a small aluminum bracket bent into a U shape. I like that the ugly bottle is hidden, but I'm gonna come up with something easier for filling up the bottle. Right now, the cap rests below a removable factory rubber cap/plug, but I may run another hose from the cap to a higher point for filling the bottle.



The two relays on the passenger side are for the electric fans. I'm stuck on which way to wire the fans with the vintage air trinary switch. The GM ecu sends a ground to complete the circuit and trigger the relay, and has 2 separate wires which are programmed to send a ground at a specific engine temperature. The vintage air trinary switch also sends a ground to activate a relay. It seems pretty simple to just tie the grounds of the ecu and trinary switch together, but I have read that the GM ecu does not like having a ground coming from another switch.

Would adding a diode or a third relay work better to isolate the ecu and trinary switch?
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Old 08-07-2018, 01:24 PM   #47
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Nice progress. This is the behind the scenes stuff most people don't bother taking pictures for the rest of us.
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Old 08-07-2018, 02:09 PM   #48
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Nice progress. This is the behind the scenes stuff most people don't bother taking pictures for the rest of us.
Thanks, I try to take pictures of and document everything I do for a build.
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Old 08-09-2018, 05:33 PM   #49
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I wired in the trinary switch with no diodes for now as a test. A few people have said that the gen 3 LS engine ecu's do not give a check engine light for the ground, but the gen 4 do. I'll have to confirm that later. If I have to add a diode or another relay, no big deal. Following Vintage Air's wiring diagram, the trinary switch was wired to the dashboard temp switch, relay, compressor, and a ground. I hid the wire for the compressor clutch between the radiator and frame rail, but it will need a small clamp to secure it.





Since I had to run another wire through the fender loom from the dashboard temperature switch to the trinary switch, I added 2 more rubber isolated clamps. They are attached by the same welded on nut/bolt combo and I added 2 more to the driver's side.



I have a large sheet of 1/8" thick HDPE left over from my Turbo Miata under tray, so it was used to make a switch plate. I drilled a few holes and transferred the stickers and switches over from the Vintage Air switch plate. The stickers for the switches are fine, but the knobs scream 60's muscle car. I'm going to try to find a Volvo knob that will fit the switches.



As of this morning I have everything wired up on the chassis side and performed an electrical test. I hooked up all the switches, lights, instrument cluster, radio, wiper/washer, and fuel pump to a distribution block connected to the battery.



Everything works on the car except the turn signals. I'm blaming the turn signals not working on the terrible wiring that literally fell apart in my hand pictured below.

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Old 08-11-2018, 11:02 PM   #50
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I have some good news and bad news. The good news is the distribution block and wires are mounted. I even found a spot for the vintage air circuit breaker on the mount for the evaporator. Furthermore, I connected the switched ignition wire for the vintage air to the factory heater blower fuse output (fuse #3).



The bad news is when wiring the starter motor today, I'm pretty sure I fried the ignition switch.



Some backstory first, I made a cable to connect the starter motor power to the distribution block, and connected the GM starter solenoid ignition wire (purple wire) to the Volvo's solenoid wire (blue wire) off the ignition switch. Everything worked on the car until I tried to fire over the starter as a test. The starter did fire over, then nothing. I killed almost all power to the car, but did not blow any fuses. I get ~2 volts at the distribution block, unless I unhook the hot wire connected to fuse #7 (to distribution block). For some reason, with this wire unhooked, I get ~12.6 volts at the distribution block, but the key turned to any of the positions, the distribution block has less than 1 volt, even with the #7 fuse wire unhooked. I have also tried a second battery, and have completely unhooked the starter motor power and ignition wires, but no changes. The voltage at the battery is 12.7 volts, and 12.7 volts right after the trunk's 200 amp main fuse.

From my testing/tracing with a voltmeter I believe the ignition switch is burnt and causing most of the issue, but how would I test it?
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