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Old 12-21-2010, 03:33 AM   #1
gross polluter
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Default The official DSM CAS information and install guide

Introduction

The DSM Cam Angle Sensor (CAS) has recently proven itself as a superior solution to adding crank and cam triggering to custom engine management setups on redblock engines. This guide will explain how the DSM CAS works, how to identify it, what you need to install one on your redblock, how to install it using the Yoshifab DSM CAS adaptor, and wiring / hardware configuration for MegaSquirt II and III ECU's

There are several advantages to using a DSM Cam Angle Sensor (CAS) over many of the trigger setups currently being employed on redblock engines. The DSM CAS can be either an optical or hall-effect type sensor depending on what year vehicle the sensor came from. Both sensors work electrically the same by providing the ECU with an active 5 volt square wave. This signal is superior to the VR (magnetic) type sensors commonly found in missing tooth type triggers, including the LH2.4 crank sensor located on the bell housing of later B230’s. VR sensors can be very troublesome for many users due to their susceptibility of picking up noise, causing false triggers and lost sync conditions. Even during slow cranking conditions the DSM CAS will feed a reliable 5 volt square wave to the ECU, reducing crank-to-start time and eliminating lost sync issues. The DSM CAS supplies both cam and crank trigger signals. This helps tidy up wiring, eliminates the need for a custom crank pulley, eliminates figuring out how to mount a cam sensor, and many other complications associated with fitting custom triggers.

The DSM CAS can be found on many 1990 through 1994 Mitsubishi 1.8l, 2.0l, and 2.4l DOHC based engines. You can purchase these sensors brand new, however, they cost several hundred dollars. These sensors are very robust and hardly ever fail therefore the junkyard or internet classifieds are a good low cost source for these sensors. There are three different types of DSM CAS': The early sensors have a four wire lead coming out of the sensor about two feet long terminated with a square four pin connector. Later sensors have a rectangular 4 pin connector on the sensor body. All of the DSM CAS’ are optical sensors with the rare exception of the 1994 model-years that used a Hall-effect sensor. The Hall-effect sensors can be identified with a black dome cover, opposed to the flat metal can cover used on the optical sensors.

*IMPORTANT- If you're installing the DSM CAS in a block-mounted drive application, such as the Yoshifab DSM CAS adpater, the Hall-effect type CAS will not work since the sensor spins in the opposite direction and there's no easy way to modify the trigger vanes.

CAS with wire lead terminated with a square plug:

image taken from dsmpartout.com

CAS with square plug on sensor body:

image taken from dsmpartout.com

Hall-effect type CAS. Avoid this part as it will not work in block mounted applications:

image taken from dsmpartout.com

Applications

The DSM CAS can be found in the following vehicles:

CAS with wire leads and square plug:
HYUNDAI ELANTRA (1992 - 1994)
HYUNDAI ELANTRA GL (1992 - 1994)
HYUNDAI ELANTRA GLS (1992 - 1994)
HYUNDAI ELANTRA (1994 - 1995)
HYUNDAI ELANTRA GL (1994 - 1995)
HYUNDAI ELANTRA GLS (1994 - 1995)
HYUNDAI SONATA (1994 - 1995)
HYUNDAI SONATA GL (1994 - 1995)
HYUNDAI SONATA GLS 1994
DODGE 2000 GTX 1990
MITSUBISHI GALANT 1990
MITSUBISHI GALANT GS 1990
MITSUBISHI GALANT GSX 1990
MITSUBISHI GALANT LS 1990
EAGLE TALON 1990
EAGLE TALON TSI 1990
MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE GS 1990
MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE GSX 1990
MITSUBISHI GALANT 1989
MITSUBISHI GALANT GS 1989
MITSUBISHI GALANT LS 1989
PLYMOUTH LASER RS 1990

CAS with rectangle connector on sensor body:
EAGLE TALON ES (1991 - 1994)
EAGLE TALON TSI (1991 - 1994)
MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE GS (1991 - 1994)
MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE GSX (1991 - 1994)
MITSUBISHI GALANT 1992
MITSUBISHI GALANT ES 1993
MITSUBISHI GALANT GS 1992
MITSUBISHI GALANT GSR 1992
MITSUBISHI GALANT GSX 1992
MITSUBISHI GALANT LS (1992 - 1993)
MITSUBISHI GALANT S 1993
MITSUBISHI GALANT VR-4 1992

If you're searching for these vehicles in a wrecking yard, you will find the sensor mounted to the head driven by the intake cam, as circled below:



How it works

The DSM CAS in stock form will supply a crank reference trigger every 180 degrees of crank rotation and supplies two cam pulses every 720 degrees of crank rotation. The cam pulses are spaced at uneven intervals and both pulses vary in duration. These pulses supply both cam position and fuel injection timing information in their native environments. Due to the complexity of this trigger, you cannot configure the stock DSM CAS as a basic trigger and the ecu you're using MUST support the DSM CAS trigger pattern.

As previously mentioned, the Hall-effect type DSM CAS cannot be used in a block mounted application because of the direction the sensor is rotated. The Hall-effect CAS works very similar to the sensor found in LH2.2 distributors where metal vanes pass through a sensor. There's no easy way to modify these vanes for use in applications that spin the sensor in the opposite direction, so these sensors should be avoided.

The optical type DSM CAS works by rotating a disc with windows through a sensor. The windows allow light to pass through the disc, changing the state of the sensor output. The thin disc on this sensor is held in by a screw and can be flipped for proper use in block mounted applications, or replaced with an entirely different disc.

It is highly recommended that a higher resolution trigger disc be used, such as the Yoshifab DSM CAS hires trigger disc. This disc supplies 12 crank reference pulses per 360 degrees crank rotation and a single trigger for cam position, allowing the use of a basic trigger configuration in your ecu as well as more accurate and stable timing.


View inside a stock optical type DSM CAS:


Stock DSM CAS trigger disc (left) compared to the Yoshifab hires trigger disc (right):
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Old 12-21-2010, 03:33 AM   #2
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What parts are needed to install the CAS

First and foremost you need an engine management that's compatible with the DSM CAS. Megasquirt, among other standalone engine management systems are compatible with the DSM CAS. The DSM CAS replaces the distributor, so your engine management system will require a distributorless ignition system such as wasted spark or coil-per-plug. Stock Jetronic systems (LH2.2, LH2.4, etc) are NOT compatible with the DSM CAS. Distributor ignition systems are NOT compatible with the DSM CAS. If these requirements are met then the following parts will be needed to install the DSM CAS:

-You'll need an optical type DSM CAS. Either style will work. You can use the early style with the wire lead and square plug or the later style with rectangular plug on the sensor body. If you're using a CAS with the wire leads then you'll need other end of the plug OR you can clip off the stock plug and attach your own connector. If your early style CAS has broken or frayed wires close to the sensor, don't worry, you can fix that. the wiring section of this guide reveals that the wires can be removed and replaced within the CAS.

If you're using the later model CAS with the rectangular plug on the sensor body then you'll need the plug off of the harness. Sometimes you'll find that the CAS connector is in less than desirable condition. If you can't find a good CAS connector then you can use the TPS connector from the same car. The TPS on most of the pre-OBD-II cars have only three of the four pins populated on the plug. You'll need to obtain a second connector to remove one or more of the pins from. The TPS plugs have different key ways than the CAS plugs. You can file off one of the keys on the CAS plug to make the TPS plug fit. This will be covered in-depth in the wiring section.

- Yoshifab DSM CAS adapter. This adapter installs in place of block mounted distributor on redblock engines. Your engine will need an axillary shaft with a distributor drive gear. All 240's have this gear as they have block mounted distributors from the factory. 740's and 940's have head mounted distributors and do not have a distributor gear on their axillary shafts. Engines with head mounted distributors will require the auxiliary shaft to be replaced with a shaft that has a distributor drive gear.

- Yoshifab hires trigger disc. This part is optional but strongly suggested. The hires trigger disc has four times the resolution as the stock trigger. This trigger disc also converts the sensor to a basic wheel type sensor by having only one cam pulse. If your engine management does not support the 4G63 CAS and supports a toothed-wheel trigger then you will need this disc.

Last edited by gross polluter; 12-21-2010 at 06:57 PM..
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Old 12-21-2010, 03:34 AM   #3
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Installation

Before assembling the CAS and adapter you must change the trigger disc inside the CAS. The hires disc replaces the stock disc inside the sensor. If you chose to run the stock disc than you must flip the disc in order for the sensor to operate properly in block mounted applications.

The sensor cover is held on by two tamper-proof screws. These screws have a beveled head that prevents a screwdriver from properly gripping the screw head when you try to loosen the screw. These screws can be removed by gripping the side of the head with vise grips. All you need to do is break the screw loose. Once the screw is broken lose you can use a flat blade screw driver to remove the screw completely.



When the cover is removed the trigger disc is revealed. The disc is held in place by a single Phillips head screw. To remove the trigger disc you will need to remove this screw. This screw is extremely tight so it’s crucial that a proper size Phillips head screw driver is used, otherwise you will strip the head of the screw. A well made #2 driver will work fine. To remove the screw, it’s a good idea to mount the CAS in a bench vise or temporarily mount it on the engine to provide a good hold while you loosen the screw. Once the screw is removed pay close attention to the washers holding in the disc. One of the washers is keyed with the drive shaft in the CAS, the other smaller washer goes on top of the keyed washer. There is another keyed washer under the disc that should not be removed.

To remove the disc you will need to lift it off of the drive shaft and slide it out of the optical sensor. There are two small Philips screws holding the optical sensor in place. DO NOT REMOVE THESE SCREWS!!! The optical sensor is soldered in place from the factory. Removing these screws will break the solder joints and destroy the sensor. Once you have removed the disc retention screw and both washers, lift up on the disc on the side opposite of the optical sensor. It should take very little effort to lift the disc out of the shaft. Once the disc is tilted out of the shaft you can slide the disc out of the optical sensor.

If you’re going to use the stock trigger disc than you may simply flip the disc over and re-install the disc in the same manner that it was removed. Do not re-install the CAS cover yet. This will be done after installation.

Installing the hires trigger disc

Before installing the hires trigger disc you will need to verify orientation. Lay the disc flat on a table with the key of the disc facing up. The cam sensor window should be to the left of the key as shown in the picture below:



Install the Disc into the CAS with this orientation. The hires disc is slightly thicker than the stock disc so it will require a little bit of more effort to install. It’s best to align the flat key on the CAS drive shaft towards the optical sensor to help slide the disc in place. Once the disc is mounted you may reinstall the retention washers and screw, ensuring that the keyed washer is installed properly on the drive shaft. Once the retention screw is tightened rotate the CAS by hand to make sure the disc does not rub anywhere in the sensor. When the disc is installed it should look exactly like the picture below. Do not install the CAS cover yet. This will be installed after mounting.



Installing the CAS

Mount the CAS on the Yoshifab adapter. You’ll notice two slotted holes on the CAS body. Mount the CAS to the adapter so both bolts are in the middle of the CAS. This will allow you to adjust your base timing later on. The CAS and adapter should look like this assembled:



Before installing the CAS adapter into the block you will need to rotate the engine to TDC. You will need to make sure the engine is on TDC so cylinder #1 is on compression stroke. This means that both the crank and cam will need to be aligned with their timing marks. Failure to do so will cause your ecu to fire the injectors and ignition on the wrong phase.

To align a stock trigger disc rotate the CAS so the large cam slot is inside the optical sensor. Both crank slots should be exposed evenly on either side of the optical sensor. Pictures will come soon for this alignment.

To align the hires disc install the sensor so the cam window is half way exposed to the right of the sensor. When installed on the block the CAS should look exactly like the picture below:



Bolt the CAS adapter to the block. Base timing will be set by rotating the cas on the adapter.

NOTICE: Some certain types of CAS' have slightly different bases. The first generation of Yoshifab adapters may have a slight problem with fitment. The problem may be addressed in the following manner:

Quote:
Originally Posted by sdturbo View Post
It appears the issue is that the 90 style cas with the pigtail coming out does not have a bevel cut in the end and the post 90 cas does. This means that there is a fitment problem using a 90 cas. I will be updating the design for the next production run to fit both. If you have this issue, simply file the end to look like the post 90 style or find a 91 up cas.

Here is a pic that shows the difference. 90 is on the right.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wennstroma View Post
I had to file down the outside diameter on one of the steps to get it to fully seat. The step on mine had straight sides, others I've seen are tapered on that step so they would fit fine.




Last edited by gross polluter; 03-09-2011 at 06:47 PM..
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Old 12-21-2010, 03:35 AM   #4
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Wiring

Wiring is straight forward. The DSM CAS has a total of four connections. The CAS is powered by a 12 volt source that is powered on with the ignition key and remains on during cranking. The 12v supply to your ecu is a perfect source for power to the CAS. The CAS ground should be connected directly to the ECU ground. The other two connections are for the cam and crank signals. These signals are floating outputs that are pulled to ground when the trigger disc allows light to pass through the optical sensor. In order for the CAS to work properly your ECU will need to provide a 5 volt pull-up on the cam and crank sensor inputs.

Wiring for a CAS with a rectangle plug on the sensor body

While harvesting a CAS you'll notice the harness plugs are in bad shape and most of them are unusable. If your plug is in good shape, skip this paragraph. If you're having a hard time finding a good condition CAS plug in the junkyard you can use the TPS plug from the same vehicles with a little bit of modification. Most Mitsubishi TPS plugs only have three wires with a spot in the plug for a fourth wire. You will need to locate another TPS plug or CAS plug and remove one of the pins from those plugs and insert one of the pins in your TPS plug to have four wires. Some of the later model Mitsubishi engines had a four wire TPS and do not require any additional pins. The TPS plugs also have different keys on the connector. This problem is easily remedied by taking a file and filing off the contending key on the CAS connector.

Details coming soon on swapping pins on a CAS connector

Looking at the plug on the CAS straight on, the pinout as follows:



1 – Cam position sensor
2 – Crank position sensor
3 - +12v hot in run and start
4 – Sensor ground

Wiring for a CAS with wire leads and square connector

The options for wiring are a little more broad with this CAS. Since the CAS has wire leads coming out of the case you can use different connectors to suit your application. It's common for this type of CAS to have frayed or broken wires just out of the case. This does not mean the CAS is unusable, however. Many of these early sensors had screw terminals in the sensor housing that allows you to replace the wire. Not all of these sensors had the screw terminals, if you find one in the wrecking yard with wires broken out of the housing it would be a good idea to remove the cover of the CAS to verify that it's repairable. You should see four screw terminals like the picture below:


Picture taken from JARYphoto's flickr album

Wiring is simple:

Red - +12v
Black - Ground
White - Cam signal
Yellow - Crank signal

Last edited by gross polluter; 12-23-2010 at 02:07 AM..
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Old 12-21-2010, 05:33 PM   #5
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Detailed ECU configuration coming soon. For now, here's a screen shot of relevant settings for those who already have their ECU wired up for the DSM CAS. This is an MS3 screen shot, however, these settings apply to MS2 as well.


Last edited by gross polluter; 02-12-2011 at 04:13 PM..
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Old 12-21-2010, 05:48 PM   #6
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This is good so far. Thanks for the write up.
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Old 12-21-2010, 09:44 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scottyd View Post
This is good so far. Thanks for the write up.
I second this motion.
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Old 12-22-2010, 03:04 AM   #8
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Thirded and 1 question, what size bolts are they held in with so i only have to bring 1 wrench to the yard lol

Thanks for listing the cars. That'll make my life tons easier
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Old 12-22-2010, 03:20 AM   #9
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A 12mm wrench will remove the CAS bolts.
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Old 12-24-2010, 10:59 AM   #10
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I just grabbed one off a 6cyl DSM at the junkyard (all the 4 cylinder cars were stripped), the sensor has the same numbers on it as the one pictured. Just wanted to put it out there.
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Old 12-24-2010, 01:46 PM   #11
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No such thing as a 6 cylinder DSM. A 6 cylinder Mitsubishi CAS look like this:



None of the 6cyl Mitsubishi's used a CAS identical to the four cylinder cars. Mounting is much different as well. These sensors are not a direct replacement for what's documented in this thread.

Last edited by gross polluter; 12-25-2010 at 11:35 AM..
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Old 12-24-2010, 03:22 PM   #12
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It sure looked like a DSM but I'm no rice expert. I can't see the one you posted but it looks nearly identical to the one in the first post and has "T1T49371 R" and "OY24" on it.

(edit)

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Old 12-25-2010, 05:59 AM   #13
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Just from that picture I can see that the mounting is different and that the body dia is bigger and longer. Better pay more attention to your "rice". DSMs are built in Normal, IL BTW.
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Old 12-25-2010, 10:57 AM   #14
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Oh well, I guess I'll sell it on ebay and try to find a 4cyl that hasn't been stripped. The CAS I have came off a 3000GT, which I thought was a DSM but apparently it isn't. I knew DSMs were American built, BTW. I call them rice because most of them are riced around here, including the ones I see in the junkyard. Very rarely do I see a DSM that is actually fast.
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Old 01-14-2011, 10:39 PM   #15
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Any updates on this Nick?
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Old 01-15-2011, 01:24 AM   #16
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The final part, ecu configuration, will be done very soon. It's a difficult section to write since there's a plethora of different MS setups out there. I'm trying to keep the documentation as specific as possible to try and cover everything without writing a novel.

I'll have it up by the end of the weekend.
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Old 01-15-2011, 11:30 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gross polluter View Post
No such thing as a 6 cylinder DSM. A 6 cylinder Mitsubishi CAS look like this:



None of the 6cyl Mitsubishi's used a CAS identical to the four cylinder cars. Mounting is much different as well. These sensors are not a direct replacement for what's documented in this thread.
actually the sensor part of it is, the shell and the mechanical means to make it work, however, are not.

that's really just a longwinded way to say "hang on to it" since the senor part of it will interchange.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sdturbo View Post
Just from that picture I can see that the mounting is different and that the body dia is bigger and longer. Better pay more attention to your "rice". DSMs are built in Normal, IL BTW.
yep. I thought I posted about that elsewhere? I grabbed a v6 cas so I'd have a spare pickup setup.
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Old 01-15-2011, 12:52 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by linuxman51 View Post
actually the sensor part of it is, the shell and the mechanical means to make it work, however, are not.
I know that. For all intents and purposes of this manual, and to try and reach an audience with a broad range of mechanical aptitudes, I'd like to keep it focused on what works with Josh's adapter.

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Old 01-26-2011, 08:31 PM   #19
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While poking around at the shop today, I noticed that the earlier miatas with no head mounted ignition coil pack indeed have a DSM cas.

The unit was out sitting on the bench, and it had a mitsubishi insignia on it. I was not allowed to open the unit to my dismay and inspect to see if it was indeed optical or magnetic.
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Old 01-26-2011, 09:02 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DNAsEqUeNcE View Post
While poking around at the shop today, I noticed that the earlier miatas with no head mounted ignition coil pack indeed have a DSM cas.

The unit was out sitting on the bench, and it had a mitsubishi insignia on it. I was not allowed to open the unit to my dismay and inspect to see if it was indeed optical or magnetic.

Again, the internals are going to be the same. Same disk, same sensor different housing and different mounts.
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Old 01-26-2011, 09:16 PM   #21
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derp :(
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Old 01-26-2011, 09:34 PM   #22
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What's next, people coming on and telling us that SR20's have DSM CAS' too? Just because it has a Mitsubishi logo does not mean it is for sure a DSM CAS.
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Old 01-28-2011, 07:07 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gross polluter View Post
Before installing the hires trigger disc you will need to verify orientation. Lay the disc flat on a table with the key of the disc facing up. The cam sensor window should be to the left of the key as shown in the picture below:

I haven't looked into how the second trigger works yet, so this may be a dumb question, but the position of the inner window on the wheel I got is slightly different than the one pictured above. Will this affect the settings?



Quote:
Originally Posted by gross polluter View Post
What's next, people coming on and telling us that SR20's have DSM CAS' too? Just because it has a Mitsubishi logo does not mean it is for sure a DSM CAS.
Mine has "MANDO" written on all the parts instead of the Mitsubishi logo.
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Old 01-28-2011, 07:52 PM   #24
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No. MS simply looks at where the cam tooth is and considers the next crank tooth "tooth 1." The position of the crank teeth have not changed therefore timing will not be affected.
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Old 02-03-2011, 02:14 PM   #25
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Got my CAS, adapter and hi res disc, just need to finish setting up MS. Eagerly awaiting the final part to this, so i'll just keep buggin ya
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