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Old 12-06-2006, 10:21 AM   #1
frpe82
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Default Chipping FAQ

CHIPPING FAQ


Chips for redblocks group-buy thread: Chips for redblocks

Since a lot of questions are constantly asked about chips and also LH2.2/LH2.4 in general I thought it would be time for a FAQ thread. You will find a lot of info here and it will be constantly updated with more and more questions.

The questions are not sorted in any specific order yet, but will be once the FAQ is near complete and to my satisfaction. I will also add pictures to the FAQ as we go along.

Please feel free to post more questions and suggestions and I will add them to the FAQ.



Q: Which cars/engines are chippable?

A: Supported engines: All cars with a redblock turbo engine, cars with a +T (a naturally aspirated engine with a turbo added afterwards), and cars with a naturally aspirated 16v redblock.

Supported engine management systems: LH2.4 and LH2.2. Motronic ML1.1 chips can be supplied on request.

The naturally aspirated 8v redblocks are not supported because the "bang for your buck" is too small. Sure, the driveability will be much better and it will have all the benefits the other cars have with a chip, but it will not gain any real power.



Q: What are the gains?

A: For all chips, better driveability and overall power. It will gain "more area under the curve" so to speak. The chips make the car perform it´s best and that is how it should have been from the factory, but Volvo had to factor in a lot of variables such as negligent mainetance etc. and still make the car work at all. That is why the stock chips lack so much power and driveability.

The turbo engines with LH2.4 will gain 55HP and 70NM (52lb/ft) of torque.
The LPT engines (B230FK) with LH2.4 will gain 80HP and 105NM (77lb/ft) of torque.
The 2.0L 16v turbo engines (B204FT/GT) will gain 70HP+ and 55NM+ (40lb/ft+) of torque.
The turbo engines with LH2.2 will gain 50HP and 50NM (37lb/ft) of torque.
The +T'd engines will gain a few % more HP and torque than the regular turbo engines.
The 16v engines with LH2.4 will gain at least 16HP and 20NM (15lb/ft) of torque.

The 2.0L 8v turbo engines (B200FT) will have virtually the same performance as the 2.3L 8v engines (B230FT/FK) when they are chipped. The difference is that the HP and torque peak are presented at a higher rpm than on the 2.3L engines. The 2.0L engines will also in many cases require a higher boost level to reach the same HP and torque figures.

Stock B230FK, 0.35bar (5psi) of boost:



Stock B230FT, 0.55bar (8psi) of boost:



B230FK and B230FT, 1bar (14.5psi) of boost, LH and EZK chip, 2.5" free-flowing exhaust:



Stock B204FT, 0.4/0.8bar (6/11.5psi) of boost:



B204FT, 0.85/1.25bar (12/18psi) of boost, LH and EZK chip, 2.5" free-flowing exhaust:





Q: Will my car use more gas after chipping?

A: The car will use 3-8% less gas after the chipping as long as previous driving habits are maintained. If you use the higher power output the chip gives then it will of course use more gas. It takes more gas to make more power. It all depends on your driving style.



Q: Will the chips hurt my car and/or decrease engine life?

A: No, the other way around actually. The chips are made for a higher power output and better driveability by altering the software, therefore they are better suited for high boost. Ping and knock are counteracted as long as the injectors can supply enough fuel. The chips will make your car feel healthier as long as you have what we call "Stage 0" in order. Your clutch and/or tires may suffer though if you drive agressively .



Q: Will I have to use higher octane gas, and why?

A: Yes, because the chips are made for a higher octane rating to be able to deliver better power. You need to use higher octane gas because the ignition timing is very advanced to give as much power as possible, and without a higher octane gas it would ping.



Q: Will I pass MOT / yearly inspection / smog test / emissions testing with the chips?

A: Yes, the CO and HC will not be affected in a negative way. The chips are made for the strictest emission laws anywhere in the world, and in many cases the CO and HC values are better than stock.



Q: What is "Stage 0"?

A: It is the basic things you should do to/for your car to keep it in good shape before doing any modifications. This usually means to keep the engine clean inside and out, new/good oil, new/good air filter, running good gas, using new/good spark plugs, using new/good spark plug wires, using new/good distributor, keeping all the electrical connections clean and the wires whole, keeping the mechanical components clean and functioning, using a new/good timing belt, using new/good auxilliary belts etc. Don´t ask me about problems with the chips unless you have "Stage 0" in order.



Q: What will I need to use your chips, and how do I install them?

A: All chipped cars needs a boost controller of some sort. A cheap manual boost controller is sufficient in 99% of all cases and works excellent. Look further down the thread for more info on MBC's.



The chips for both LH2.2 and LH2.4 (even the NA 16v) clearly benefit from a "sport" exhaust and an airbox mod or better air filter.

For LH2.4 users, all the LH2.4 turbo fuel ECU´s are chippable, But if you want to take full advantage of the chip package (LH2.4 + EZK chip) then you need a chippable EZK (useable ECU´s and EZK´s can be looked up further down this FAQ page). Installing the chips only involves opening up the EZK and ECU, taking out the socketed chips and replacing them with the new ones.

The chip is mounted on the socket under the white plastic cover.

EZK:



ECU:



Notice the indent in the chip. It should line up with the indent in the chip socket:





For LH2.2 users, there are only two ECU´s that are chippable, and these two ECU´s are mounted in over 90% of all LH2.2 vehicles. The numbers are 541 and 591. The 541 chip comes with a mod-kit (a small package with an instruction, 5 components, 3 bridges, 1 IC circuit and 1 chip socket) to make the ECU chippable and it is very easy to modify with a soldering iron and a few simple hand tools. If you don´t own a soldering iron or don´t feel confident that you will be able to handle it yourself, then ask a friend who is better at this task and let him do it for you. A place where they repair electronics, TV´s etc. can also be able to help you for a small fee. The 591 chip on the other hand is plug-n-play just like the LH2.4 and the only thing you have to do is to open the ECU and replace the socketed chip on the board. The EZK of LH2.2 is not chippable (yet).

This is what the 541 ECU looks like before modding and chipping:



How to chip the 541 ECU:

Look closely at the picture above. Also familiarise yourself with your own ECU and look at that. It might look a little bit different in layout than the one above. We only need to focus on the top right part of the ECU, just like pictured above. Look at your own ECU and where all the components are, and then you will see that most of them have a number written next to them.

We will start with the bridges...



* Position B705 is a bridge between two solder islands. Remove that bridge.

* Position B702 should be open. Put a bridge between the two solder islands.

* Position B703 should be open. Put a bridge between the two solder islands.

* Position B1 should be open. Put a bridge between the two solder islands.

And the resistors and capacitors...



* Position B704 should be open between the solder islands. If not, then remove the bridge. Then install the included 100 ohm resistor.

* Position R720 should be open between the solder islands. If not, then remove the bridge. Then install the included 100 ohm resistor.

* Position R721 should be open between the solder islands. If not, then remove the bridge. Then install the included 100 ohm resistor.

* Position C701 should be open between the solder islands. If not, then remove the bridge. Then install the 0.1 uF capacitor.

* Position C703 should be open between the solder islands. If not, then remove the bridge. Then install the 0.1 uF capacitor.

And the IC and chip socket...



* Install the IC 74HCT373 in the available spot on the board. Important!!! Please note the direction of the IC. Looking at the board like this, the text on the IC should be upside down.

* Install the chip socket in the available spot on the board. Important!!! Please note the direction and position of the chip socket. Looking at the board like this, the socket should be placed as far to the left as possible. You should have two holes left over on the top and the bottom on the right side of the chip socket. Also note which way the indent is facing (right).

* Then you are ready to install the chip. The indent on the chip should face the same way as the indent on the chip socket.

And after modding and chipping it should look like this:





Q: But my 541 ECU doesn´t look like the one in the picture above. Is it still chippable?

A: It should be since it is the same ECU number, only a different model with a chip alredy mounted on the board. You should be able to de-solder the current chip, put a socket in the same position and then put the new chip in it.

Here is a picture of the other model 541 ECU:





Q: Where are the EZK and ECU mounted?

A: In the 700/900-series cars the EZK is mounted to the right of the steering column under the instrument cluster. Remove the cover above the drivers feet and you will be able to see it. To remove the EZK it is recommended that you remove the metal frame together with the EZK box. In many cases it is only fastened with a single screw on the front. When you have removed that screw it will be possible to unhook the metal frame from the mounting points.

The EZK in this picture is the gold box above the steering column (marked with a "V").



The ECU is mounted under the passenger side kick panel. Remove the kick panel and you will see it. The kick panel is mounted with a few screws on the passenger side step. Remove the small plastic screw covers and remove the front 2 or 3 screws and you will be able to remove the kick panel. Be careful not to break any of the ends since they are thin (especially the top plastic bit by the passenger door, next to the glove compartment.



The ECU can be hard to get out and it is often mounted with a blind screw (no groove for the screwdriver). It can often be loosened by a small vice grip or by a flathead screwdriver and a hammer to turn it loose.

In the 200-series cars, both the ECU and EZK are mounted on the passenger side. The ECU is mounted in the same location as in the 700/900-series, and the EZK is mounted on the firewall in front of the ECU.





Q: Which number do you need to know to supply me with the correct chip?

A: The last three digits from the top number in this picture:



In some cases I can also make use of the lower number if the top number is not visible to you. I strongly prefer the top number though. Some ECU labels may be in a different color or layout.



Q: How do I know if my EZK is chippable? (Only LH2.4 systems)

A: Simple answer: You don't know if it is chippable until you open the top of the box up to check for a chip socket. It is very evident which EZK is chippable or not when the cover is off. If there is just one big motherboard in the EZK, then it is not chippable. If there is a smaller daughterboard mounted at a 90 degree angle on the motherboard just beneath the top cover of the box, it is chippable.



Exceptions:

If your EZK is gold/silver/bronze colored, it is always chippable and you do not have to open it up to check for a chip socket. Those EZK boxes have the following numbers, and they look like this:

0 227 400 207 (found in 940 '95-'96 automatic)
0 227 400 219 (found in 940 '95-'96 manual, EGR)
0 227 400 208 (found in late models 960 16v turbo)
0 227 400 147 (more rare, but found in late models 740 16v)
0 227 400 209 (more rare, but found in late 240, EGR)

There are a few other odd gold ones that were "test" EZK boxes that starts with the number 0 227 400 1xx. If you encounter one of those, please tell me and I will add them to the list.





Q: I am having a hard time finding a chippable EZK. What do I do?

A: You can buy a kit from Martijn (username: blabla) to make your black EZK chippable.



The thread where you can buy the kit is found here:
EZ116K Daughterboard GB

The thread on how to assemble the kit is found here:
EZ116K daughterboard assembly and installation guide



Q: How much will the chips help me on a stock turbo car?

A: The chips are made to transform the 165HP car into a 220HP car with stock reliability and much greater driveability with the help of only a better software and elevated boost.

If you don´t raise the boost above stock level at all, you will not gain many HP or very much torque. However, the chips will still be beneficial.

The fuel chip has better targets in the maps and will make the car run much smoother and feel healthier. You can use the engine at load levels and rpm´s that you could not get away with before.

The ignition chip has better maps as well and will make your car much more responsive and feel more alive since the ignition maps are as advanced as they can be.

The overall smoothness and response is improved, and the MPG will probably be better.

Estimated power gain is ~15HP and ~20NM (~15lb/ft) of torque without doing anything to the car.



Q: How and where do I install the MBC, and how do I set it up?

A: It is not hard at all.

Install it in line with the hose going from the compressor housing to the wastegate actuator on your turbo. Cut the hose and connect each of the open ends of the hose to the MBC. Preferrably secure the two ends of the hose to the MBC with hose-clamps. You don´t want to overboost and blow your engine if the hoses blow off.

Before starting the engine, make sure that the MBC is not set at full boost. Set it at no boost or little boost and gradually work your way up to a higher boost level. Carefully listen for ping.

Special procedure for B204FT and B204GT engines:

Install the MBC in line with the hose going to the TCU. This will fool the TCU into thinking that you are running a lower boost than you are. That way the TCU system will still be able to regulate the boost and lower it to stock level in case it feels it is needed. You will still be able to keep the safety against pinging and any slight overboost if you do it this way.

In some of the cars with B204FT/GT engines, you dont need a manual boost controller. The boost is controlled by the ECU and the new chip will raise the boost for you.



Q: What should I set the boost at?

A: That is of course dependant on the gas quality, but this is what I usually recommend:

B230FK, B230FT and B200FT:
The chips are made to run a maximum of ~15psi (1.05-1.1bar) on a stock car. That is the limit of the stock fuel system and stock turbo.

I recommend you to set the boost at 14-14.5psi if you can get good gas.

You can set the boost higher if you have the hardware to back it up.

B204FT and B204GT:
On the B204FT and B204GT engines the chips are made to run a maximum of 18psi+ (1.25-1.3bar). That is the limit of the stock fuel system and stock turbo.

I recommend you to set the boost at 16psi if you can get good gas.

You can try to go higher if you know what you are doing.

Stock boost on various engines:
B230FK = 5psi (0.35bar).
B230FT = 8psi (0.55bar).
B200FT = 8psi (0.55bar).
B204FT/GT = 6psi (0.4bar) base boost, 11.5psi (0.8bar) max boost.



Q: Will you be able to make a custom set of chips for me?

A: My first answer is no, and for many reasons. The chips I currently sell are based on several thousand hours of road testing, dyno testing and tuning. It has been developed with the help of many different cars with different mileage and in different shapes. And I don´t know how many thousand dollars that has been spent on it ($100.000+ maybe...). That is why they work so good and do what they do to keep the engine happy. I would say that the tuning of such a chip (these chips) are almost as serious as Volvo themselves are when designing one.

If we were to make a custom chip for you, which is really possible as long as you have the cash (it would cost up to ~$1000) and the ability to lend me your car, we could do it in a day or so on the dyno. But that chip will only work perfect and safe on your car, and your car only since all cars and setups are different.

But keep an eye out for a new chip type though, because you´ll never know...



Q: Can I use another turbo, cam, injectors, FPR etc. with your chip?

A: Yes you can. Minor modifications may not require it, but if you do any hardware modifications it is always recommended to check the air/fuel-ratio under heavy load (WOT) to see to that you are not running lean or excessively rich.

LH2.4 often works great with up to ~30% bigger injectors without any further modifications. Stock injectors are rated at 30-32lb/hr depending on year and model, so up to ~40lb/hr injectors should work good if you want to increase the boost even further.

LH2.2 also works pretty good with bigger injectors up to ~37lb/hr (browntops), but requires some adjustments. The thread about installing browntops or equivalent is found here: How to install Brown Tops on LH 2.2!

Using an adjustable fuel pressure regulator or a fuel pressure regulator with a different base pressure than stock to increase (or sometimes decrease) the fuel flow works very good. What is not recommended though is a RRFPR (rising-rate fuel pressure regulator) since the ECU can´t anticipate this and the car will in most cases run too rich or maybe give a fault-code. You should only install one of these if you know for sure that your setup requires it.

Installing a bigger turbo or cam that let the engine pump more air will in many cases require that you install bigger injectors or that you are running a more conservative boost level. As always, you should check the air/fuel-ratio just to be safe.



Q: Can I use a bigger AMM to run higher boost?

A: Using a bigger AMM on LH2.4 is also a great way to extend the ability of higher boost. The 3" AMM off a 91-94 960 with the last three digits 012 works on 99% of all LH2.4 ECU´s. Since this AMM is bigger than the stock AMM, you will need to match it with larger injectors. The percentual increase in cross-sectional area when going from a stock 016 AMM to a 012 AMM needs to be matched with an equal percentual increase in injector size.

You can also match bigger injectors with a custom size AMM to get the proportions right. Use the internals of a stock or 960 AMM and put them in a larger pipe. The ideal size for the AMM at your intended boost level can be optimized by measuring the voltage across pin 1 and 3 at full load. The AMM should show 5.0v at 1000rpm before the rev-limit (5.0v at 5250rpm if you use LH2.4). If the voltmeter show 5.0v before that rpm, the AMM is too small. And if the volmeter doesn´t show 5.0v until after that rpm, the AMM is too large. This is a fine balance between AMM and injector size but it will surely be rewarding once set up right.

LH2.2 users may not have many options of a bigger AMM unless you put the stock internals of the stock AMM in a larger pipe, or if you find an LH2.2 vehicle of another brand with a larger size AMM that works.

Except for the fact that you have to run proportionally larger injectors with a bigger AMM, you can also increase the injector size even further just like on the stock AMM. An increase of up to ~30% in flow over the calculated size may also work with the larger AMM.

All changes in AMM size will also result in slightly more advanced ignition timing. Always keep that in mind if you are doing a modification like this. Watch out for knock/ping.



Q: Will the chips work with alternate fuels like LPG or E85?

A: Most LPG systems are not designed for performance and the injectors are not easily replaceable, but the injectors are often of a large enough size for you to run the chips and 1bar (14.7psi) of boost to achieve 200HP+.

E85 also works like a charm (I am running E85 myself) and this fuel should be matched with at least 39% bigger injectors than stock because of a different AFR requirement to reach the desired lambda value. Full article about this can be found here: Converting to E85 (ethanol fuel)



Q: Will the insurance company, the guys at the shop, the inspectors at the smog test / MOT or the police know that the car has been chipped?

A: No, not as long as they don´t drive the car, and they would also need to know how much power the car should have in stock form to compare it with. You should be more concerned about getting fined for your noisy exhaust or the catch-can not plumbed back into the intake .



Q: Is the rev-limit raised or removed?

A: No, for many reasons.

One reason being that you would have to run lower boost across the board unless you have an electronic boost controller that regulates boost depending on rpm. At 14-15psi of boost the fuel flow is not sufficient for an extra 500-1000 rpm and then you would have to use bigger injectors, better cam etc. to support that. Those chips would not work on a stock car.

And one reason is that it is better for the automatic gearbox to keep the revs low. The automatics don´t like high revs. Those chips would not work on a stock car either.

Another reason is that the stock internals will have a questionable lifespan, especially the engines with 9mm rods. Much can go wrong and it is no fun if it does at 7000 rpm.

There are many other reasons for this decision as well.

But I will say this again: Keep an eye out for a new chip type though, because you´ll never know...



Q: Since I don´t live in Sweden, do I have to pay import taxes or any additional fees?

A: The package will drop down in your mailbox just like ordinary mail.

However...

For customers in the European Union (EU):
VAT (25% tax) is added to the price for residents in the EU.
To buy the chips excl. VAT you need to supply your valid VAT-number or get someone outside the EU to buy the goods for you.
Legal documentation/description here: Swedish tax agency SKV 552b, 8th edition

For ustomers outside the European Union (EU):
No VAT (25% tax) is added to the price.



Q: Can I run a 16v head with your chips?

A: Yes, a set of B230FT+16v / B234F+T chips are now available for those who choose to build such an engine.

Only do this if you know what you are doing, and if you have the time to experiment with a setup that works for you. You need to dial in the AFR´s and be well aquainted with the sound of pinging and know when you have reached the limit of your setup.

What you will need as a minimum setup:

967 ECU and chippable EZK (that ECU is available worldwide).
B230 or B234 block (up to 9.5:1 CR).
Approx. 40lb/hr injectors (420cc/min).
3" AMM (original 3" 16v AMM or 3" 012 960 AMM).
Mitsubishi TD04HL-18T or 19T turbo (optional boost).
16v stock cams (no adjustable cam gears required).
B204FT/GT exhaust manifold (preferrably ported).
A good exhaust system.

Preferred setup:

967 ECU and chippable EZK (that ECU is available worldwide).
B230 block (8.2:1 - 8.7:1 CR).
Approx. 40lb/hr injectors (420cc/min).
3" AMM (original 3" 16v AMM or 3" 012 960 AMM).
T3/T4 turbo (optional boost, but 20-22psi is recommended).
16v stock cams (no adjustable cam gears required, but adjustable cam gears will be beneficial).
B204FT/GT exhaust manifold (preferrably ported), or custom header.
A good exhaust system.

Something to concider:

You should use a better intake manifold than the stock B234F. Preferrably a B204FT/GT intake manifold or a custom one. The stock B234F intake manifold is not balanced and will favour two of the cylinders more than the others and that can have catastrophical implications on your engine.

Expected power:

Minimum setup: 200-250HP when run as an LPT or low-boost engine. up to 300HP if you use it as a high-boost engine.

Recommended setup: More than 300HP. Your imagination is setting the limit (well... your credit card and your balls will probably be the limit).



Q: Can I go crazy and run a supercharger with your chips?

A: Yes, you can. It is untested but very likely, yes... It is just like running a turbo except you don´t have any backpressure and therefore you will have a better filling/emptying of the cylinders even further extending your ability to run higher boost and getting more power. Choose/adjust your cam wisely though.



Q: Is there a run-in procedure for these chips?

A: Yes. For the chips to work optimal you need to let them be run-in and adapt properly. I can understand that you want to go into boost ASAP after installing the chips and upping the boost. But please don´t. Let the car adjust, re-adjust and "settle in" before you try to time your 0-60 or whatever.

I know it´s hard, but please be patient.

It takes a while for the car to get use to the changes.
It will run a little bit odd or even like crap at first.
The first 10 times under boost or so, the car will not show its full potential.

My recommendation is to:
* Install the chips.
* Start it and let it idle for a while.
* Drive around, let it warm up.
* Set the boost to its recommended setting of ~14psi.
(The boost can be set higher on the B204FT and B204GT engines, and even higher in some cases)
* Drive it harder and harder and then drive "normal" for a while.
* Repeat a few times.
* A total of an hour or two of driving is often enough.
Now it will be showing ~90% of its potential.

It takes a day before it runs like it should.

After that you can raise your boost even more if you have the hardware to back it up.



Q: Which ECU´s and EZK´s are compatible?

A: Below is a list that is virtually complete.

I have taken the time to make a list of all the usual chippable cars/boxes, which years and models to find the ECU´s in for interchangeability, upgrading, replacing, +T-ing, finding a chippable EZK-box, deciding on if you will go the chip route, and so on.
It might make someones quest a little bit easier.

There may be even more ECU and EZK numbers that are chippable so if you find a number that is not listed and you suspect it to be chippable, please let me know.

LH2.4

240 Saloon (P242, P244) - 2.3 i CAT 08.88-07.90 115HP B230F
240 Estate (P245) - 2.3 i CAT 08.88-07.90 115HP B230F

EZ 116 K (Ignition ECU):

0 227 400 140
0 227 400 169

All EZK´s are not "chippable". You have to open them up to check for a chip-socket on a daughter card mounted on the motherboard.
These EZK´s are not suitable for turbo or F+T without "chipping".

----------------------------------------------------------------

240 Coupé, Saloon (P242, P244) - 2.3 i CAT 08.88- 115HP B230F
240 Estate (P245) - 2.3 i CAT 08.88- 115HP B230F
740 Estate (745) - 2.0 08.89-07.91 112HP B200F
740 Estate (745) - 2.0 08.89-07.91 112HP B200F
740 Saloon (744) - 2.3 08.88-07.90 115HP B230F
740 Estate (745) - 2.3 08.88-07.90 115HP B230F

EZ 116 K (Ignition ECU):

0 227 400 146
0 227 400 169

All EZK´s are not "chippable". You have to open them up to check for a chip-socket on a daughter card mounted on the motherboard.
These EZK´s are not suitable for turbo or F+T without "chipping".

----------------------------------------------------------------

740 Saloon (744) - 2.3 08.89-07.90 151HP B234F
740 Estate (745) - 2.3 08.89-07.90 151HP B234F
740 Saloon (744) - 2.3 08.89-07.90 156HP B234F
740 Estate (745) - 2.3 08.89- 156HP B234F
740 Saloon (744) - 2.3 04.88- 159HP B234F
740 Estate (745) - 2.3 04.88- 159HP B234F
940 Saloon (944) - 2.3 09.90- 156HP B234F
940 Estate (945) - 2.3 09.90- 155HP B234F

EZ 116 K (Ignition ECU):

0 227 400 152
0 227 400 119
0 227 400 147

All EZK´s are not "chippable". You have to open them up to check for a chip-socket on a daughter card mounted on the motherboard.
These EZK´s are not suitable for turbo or F+T without "chipping".

----------------------------------------------------------------

740 Saloon (744) - 2.3 Turbo 08.89-07.90 165 B230FT
740 Estate (745) - 2.3 Turbo 08.89-07.90 165 B230FT
780 Coupé - 2.3 Turbo 165-190HP B230FT

LH2.4 (Fuel ECU):

0 280 000 563
(LH2.4.1 - Volvo p/n: 3517370, 5003787)

EZ 116 K (Ignition ECU):

0 227 400 149 - EGR

All EZK´s are not "chippable". You have to open them up to check for a chip-socket on a daughter card mounted on the motherboard.

----------------------------------------------------------------

760 Saloon (704, 764) - 2.3 Turbo 08.89-07.92 162 B230FT

LH2.4 (Fuel ECU):

0 280 000 560 - EGR
0 986 261 744 - recon. part, EGR
(LH2.4.1 - Volvo p/n: 3517368, 5003786)

0 280 000 563
(LH2.4.1 - Volvo p/n: 3517370, 5003787)

EZ 116 K (Ignition ECU):

0 227 400 149 - EGR

All EZK´s are not "chippable". You have to open them up to check for a chip-socket on a daughter card mounted on the motherboard.

----------------------------------------------------------------

940 Estate (945) - 2.0 Turbo 01.91-07.95 155HP B200FT

LH2.4 (Fuel ECU):

0 280 000 596
0 986 261 762 - recon. part
(LH 2.4.1 - Volvo p/n: 3531721)

0 280 000 932
0 986 261 809 - recon. part
0 986 262 708 - recon. part
(LH2.4.4 - Volvo p/n: 3547772, 5003832)

EZ 116 K (Ignition ECU):

0 227 400 117

All EZK´s are not "chippable". You have to open them up to check for a chip-socket on a daughter card mounted on the motherboard.

----------------------------------------------------------------

940 Saloon (944) - 2.3 Turbo 08.90-07.94 165 B230FT
940 Estate (945) - 2.3 Turbo 08.90-07.94 165 B230FT

LH2.4 (Fuel ECU):

0 280 000 563
(LH2.4.1 - Volvo p/n: 3517370, 5003787)

0 280 000 937
0 986 261 813 - recon. part
0 986 262 709 - recon. part
(LH2.4.4 - Volvo p/n: 1271895, 3547781, 5003837, 8601059)

0 280 000 954
(LH2.4.4 - Volvo p/n: n/a)

0 280 000 967
(LH2.4.4 - Volvo p/n: n/a)

0 280 000 939 - EGR
0 986 261 814 - recon. part
0 986 262 705 - recon. part
(LH2.4.4 - Volvo p/n: 3547783, 5003952, 9135138, 9146219)

----------------------------------------------------------------

940 Mk II Saloon (944) - 2.0 Turbo 04.96-10.98 155HP B200FT
940 Mk II Estate (945) - 2.0 Turbo 04.96-10.98 155HP B200FT

LH2.4 (Fuel ECU):

0 280 000 979
(LH2.4.4 - Volvo p/n: 1275202, 8601146)

0 280 000 980 - Immobilizer
(LH2.4.4 - Volvo p/n: n/a)

0 280 000 981 - Immobilizer
(LH2.4.4 - Volvo p/n: 1275467, 8601148)

0 280 000 932
0 986 261 809 - recon. part
0 986 262 708 - recon. part
(LH2.4.4 - Volvo p/n: 3547772, 5003832)

----------------------------------------------------------------

940 Mk II Saloon (944) - 2.3 Turbo 01.95-10.98 135HP B230FK
940 Mk II Estate (945) - 2.3 Turbo 01.95-10.98 135HP B230FK

LH2.4 (Fuel ECU):

0 280 000 977 - Immobilizer
0 986 262 706 - recon. part
(LH2.4.4 - Volvo p/n: 1270539, 8601215)

0 280 000 962
0 986 262 707 - recon. part
(LH2.4.4 - Volvo p/n: 8601218, 9135591)

EZ 116 K (Ignition ECU):

0 227 400 207 - EGR, some models only
0 227 400 219 - Some models only

----------------------------------------------------------------

940 Mk II Saloon (944) - 2.3 Turbo 08.94-10.98 165HP B230FT & FT4
940 Mk II Estate (945) - 2.3 Turbo 08.94-10.98 165HP B230FT & FT4

LH2.4 (Fuel ECU):

0 280 000 983
(LH2.4.4 - Volvo p/n: n/a)

0 280 000 984 - immobilizer
(LH2.4.4 - Volvo p/n: 8601361, 9125465, 9179343)

0 280 000 962
0 986 262 707 - recon. part
(LH2.4.4 - Volvo p/n: 8601218, 9135591)

EZ 116 K (Ignition ECU):

0 227 400 207 - EGR, some models only

----------------------------------------------------------------

740/760/940/960 - 2.0 16V Turbo 190/200HP B204FT/GT

LH2.4 (Fuel ECU):

0 280 000 597
0 986 261 763 - recon. part
(LH2.4.1 - Volvo p/n: 3531519, 5003776)

0 280 000 578
0 986 261 754 - recon. part
(LH2.4.1 - Volvo p/n: 3517718, 5003775)

0 280 000 926
0 986 262 702 - recon. part
0 986 262 711 - recon. part
(LH2.4.4 - Volvo p/n: 3507258, 3547059, 5003826)

0 280 000 950
(LH2.4.4 - Volvo p/n: Should be interchangeable with 0 280 000 926)

EZ 116 K (Ignition ECU):

0 227 400 159
0 227 400 208

All EZK´s are not "chippable". You have to open them up to check for a chip-socket on a daughter card mounted on the motherboard.

----------------------------------------------------------------

LH2.4 non-turbo

740 Saloon (744) - 2.3 08.89-07.90 151HP B234F/G
740 Estate (745) - 2.3 08.89-07.90 151HP B234F/G
740 Saloon (744) - 2.3 08.89-07.90 156HP B234F/G
740 Estate (745) - 2.3 08.89- 156HP B234F/G
740 Saloon (744) - 2.3 04.88- 159HP B234F/G
740 Estate (745) - 2.3 04.88- 159HP B234F/G
940 Saloon (944) - 2.3 09.90- 156HP B234F/G
940 Estate (945) - 2.3 09.90- 155HP B234F/G

LH2.4 (Fuel ECU):

0 280 000 549
0 986 261 738 - recon. part
(LH2.4.0 - Volvo p/n: 1367065, 5003789)

0 280 000 562 - EGR
0 986 261 746 - EGR, recon. part
(LH2.4.0 - Volvo p/n: 3507605, 3517372, 5003794)

0 280 000 571
0 986 261 751 - recon. part
(LH2.4.0 - Volvo p/n: 3507604, 3517608, 5003793)

0 280 000 911
0 986 261 805 - recon. part
(LH2.4.2 - Volvo p/n: 3547262, 5003792)

0 280 000 928
0 986 261 807 - recon. part
0 986 262 700 - recon. part
(LH2.4.3 - Volvo p/n: 3547788, 5003840, 9146218)

EZ 116 K (Ignition ECU):

0 227 400 152
0 227 400 119
0 227 400 147

All EZK´s are not "chippable". You have to open them up to check for a chip-socket on a daughter card mounted on the motherboard.

----------------------------------------------------------------

LH2.2

740 Saloon (744) - 2.3 Turbo 08.86-07.89 156HP B230FT
740 Estate (745) - 2.3 Turbo 08.86-07.89 156HP B230FT
760 Saloon (704, 764) - 2.3 Turbo 01.88-07.89 162HP B230FT

LH2.2 (Fuel ECU):

0 280 000 541
(Volvo p/n: 1367487)

0 280 000 591
0 986 261 759
(Volvo p/n: 3531107, 5003765)

----------------------------------------------------------------

Motronic ML1.1

740 Saloon (744) - 2.3 Turbo 08.85-12.88 182HP B230ET
740 Estate (745) - 2.3 Turbo 08.85-07.88 182HP B230ET
760 Saloon (704, 764) - 2.3 Turbo 08.84-10.88 182HP B230ET
760 Estate (704, 765) - 2.3 Turbo 08.84-07.89 182HP B230ET

Motronic ML1.1 (Fuel/ignition ECU):

0 261 200 022
0 261 200 026
0 986 262 313 - recon. part
(Volvo p/n: 1346945, 1367531, 5003799, 1367142, 1367533)

----------------------------------------------------------------

740 Saloon (744) - 2.0 01.85-08.90 160HP (163HP) B200ET

Motronic ML1.1 (Fuel/ignition ECU):

0 261 200 023
0 986 261 050 - recon. part
(Volvo p/n: 1346946, 1367532, 5003800)

----------------------------------------------------------------

And as another useful piece of information:
You can always put a newer ECU in an older car, but often not the other way around.
They are backwards compatible.




Q: I have something they call a "fuel cut". Will the chips remove it?

A: Yes. But you have to differentiate between fuel cut and maxing out the AMM. The chips will support as much as the hardware and A/D-converters in the ECU can handle, but when the AMM is maxed out (reading more than a certain air-flow and outputting more than a little over 5 volts) there is nothing you can do except for doing the "diode trick" (do a search for it) or go to a bigger size AMM in conjunction with bigger injectors.



Q: Do you sell chips for other cars than the ones mentioned here?

A: Yes, I sell chips for virtually any car but since this is a RWD Volvo forum the only chips listed are the ones for redblocks. If you have a specific request then send me a PM.



Q: Are there any LH2.2 or LH2.4 ECU numbers that are better than others?

A: Both yes and no...

For LH2.2:

The 541 and 591 ECU are the same but with two differences. The 591 has newer (better) components that makes it more durable and stable. The 591 also has a removable chip. Other than that the 541 and 591 doesn´t differ in function or driveability. With the mod-kit that is included in the 541 chip package the 541 becomes a 591.

For LH2.4:

When using my chips the acceleration enrichments and driveability will be (nearly) the same on all ECU´s and EZK´s because the software is the same.

But... (and this is why I said "nearly" in the previous sentence) the ECU´s will have different hardware and therefore also be somewhat different in their operation. Not everything is in the software. Some things are coded in the hardware. Some ECU´s are quicker, others are slower because of the CPU. Some of them have a better AMM control hardware, better A/D-converters and some will have better and more stable components. Some have better hardware routines and a different sequence (order) of collecting data and giving signals to the various engine components.

I like two specific generations of ECU´s better than the rest. The 56x (560 / 563) generation and the 97x/98x (977 specifically, and the 983 / 984).

Why? Yes, I will tell you:

The 56x ECU´s were the first fully digital ECU´s for turbo use in a Volvo and had to be something special. They are among the slowest ECU´s but they are the most adaptible since the designers wanted to be very careful and have a very fail-safe turbo fuel system. The earlier style ECU´s such as the 56x tend to always run a little bit richer than the newer ECU´s just to be safe.

And then there is the latest style LH2.4 ECU. It is the quickest of them all and they have all the newest most stable components and the best hardware coding. This unfortunately makes them very picky about which car they are in, not only because of the Immobilizer function but also because they are specifically matched to a certain hardware and are extremely well calibrated. All the latest style ECU´s will work exactly the same. They are the most stable and I say that they will not "un-learn" if you will.

Think of the 977, 983 and 984 as computer components. Let´s think of them as a computer motherboard. The motherboards are the same in all the ECU´s from the 560 all the way to the 984, but the later numbers have a newer revision of the hardware and the "BIOS" if we can call it that. The later versions of the ECU´s are made to deal with a larger number of functions and do them in a different order and put emphasis on some parts of the engine management and give other things less importance. Why? Because the designers of the ECU´s have been following what has happened to the cars equipped with these LH2.4 ECU´s through the years, and they have seen that some features are not as important as others and therefore evolved the newer ECU numbers to put the emphasis on other instructions. The earliest ECU´s (560 and 563) have a greater control over all the functions at the same time, while the newer ECU´s have greater control over the functions that seemed most important to the designers/tuners and for the specific application.

I like the 560/563 and the 977/983/984 generations both very much and it is hard to say which one is the best. They are good at two different things.

In short:

The 560/563 have the best adaptability and will always work better when something is skewed or wrong in the car. It will run better during bad circumstances than the newer ECU´s. Precision is lower than the newer ECU´s but adaptability is greater.

The 977/983/984 are more careful and adapts to a more precise tune (not so rough) and more importance is kept on the essential bits. They are probably not as adaptible as the first generation ECU´s when something is skewed or wrong in the car. The newer ECU´s trade adaptability for precision.

I have not seen a trend in the EZK boxes so far. I think they all have the same hardware, only different software since they are pretty simple in their construction and logic. Some component changes have been made through the years, but that is probably due to reliability reasons.

Oh... and another thing: The clock frequency is very low in all ECU´s even though the CPU´s in our fuel ECU´s are rated to run at a much higher speed (several times quicker than they do now). The choice of CPU in this case is probably also due to reliability reasons.



Q: How does the LH-Jetronic system actually work, and why do I need the chips?

A: A lot of people are very curious about how LH2.4 works and it is quite a lot to explain, so it is now added in the FAQ. Here we go...

What is said about LH2.4 also applies to LH2.2, and the only difference between the two systems in practice (except for the difference in hardware technology) is that LH2.2 is slower and not quite as adaptive, but that can be used to your advantage as well in many cases.

The basic function of LH2.4 is common to all the other engine managment systems from Bosch. They all work in basically the same way.

Startup:

When the LH2.4 ECU and EZK starts up it will go through a self-test to check that everything is OK (it will check the internal components, CPU, RAM, chip software, chip checksum). It will also check the presence of all components and temperatures of the different sensors, voltages etc. just like your normal computer BIOS. It is done very fast.

Cranking:

At cranking the ECU use a base map to start the car with a fixed amount of fuel. Based on the temperature of the engine, different pulsewidths for the injectors are used. Under -16°C the cold-start injector is activated. If a cold-start injector does not exist, it will enrich the mixture by widening the pulsewidth going to the injectors.

At cranking the EZK use a base map to start the car with a fixed amount of ignition advance. It will also alter between a few degrees up and down to crank the car (probing what works best). It will use different amount of ignition advance depending on the temperature. It only does this under certain conditions such as under a certain temperature etc. and not all the time.

Afterstart:

When the engine has started it will run on afterstart enrichment. The amount of fuel and ignition advance in the afterstart enrichment and how long the period should be is determined by the base map and the temperature of the engine.

The afterstart enrichment and ignition advance maps blends/overlays with the cold-start maps if the car is going from start of the engine to running a cold engine. The afterstart enrichment and ignition advance maps blends/overlays with the normal maps if the car is going from start of the engine to running an already warm engine.

Cold start:

The cold start maps for fuel and ignition are read up to a point where the temperature goes beyond a certain point. Then it blends/overlays with the normal maps less and less until the engine is close to operating temperature.

During all stages the ECU and EZK learns how to best keep a steady idle under different temperatures.

Normal running, adapting:

The engine is considered by the ECU to be at operating temperature when it is over approximately 60°C. Then only the normal maps are used without any blending/overlaying with the other maps.

When the engine is at operating temperature the EZK uses a fixed amount of ignition advance at idle.

When the engine is at operating temperature the ECU tries to maintain a stoichiometric mixture of the fuel (AFR 14.7). The O2-sensor tells the ECU if it is lean or rich and the ECU compensates by altering the pulsewidth of the injectors.

When the engine is at operating temperature the ECU tries to maintain a steady and fixed idle. It gets the rpm signal from the crank sensor and adjusts the idle-air motor to give the engine the right amount of air to keep the right speed. The speed is different depending on the temperature, but when the engine is at operation temperature the idle should be steady at the rpm written in your instruction book. The A/C-system, engine fan and gear position (automatic gearbox) will also tell the ECU when to adjust the idle not to stall when the A/C-compressor, engine fan or a gear is engaged.

When the engine is running on the normal maps it really gets to work. The ECU is looking at the O2-sensor under closed-loop and various light load conditions up to around 3500rpm or so to calculate how much fuel that is needed to keep the mixture stoichiometric. The AMM reads how much air is passing in to the engine and also helps the ECU estimate how much fuel to add (or else the ECU would be pretty slow to react if it only did its calculations off the O2-sensor alone). The values that the ECU learns is right to keep the mixture at stoichiometric mixture is written to the map in the chip to use as base values (this includes rewriting the cranking, afterstart enrichment and cold-start maps for later use).

The EZK does almost the same thing as the ECU. During low to medium load it is checking for pinging and if that should occur on a regular basis the ignition map is rewritten a little.

Normal running, function:

Both the ECU and EZK will adapt all the time, but eventually it has refined the maps enough that only minor corrections are made and when it has got that far you will not notice much of a difference in performance from day to day.

The ECU will use the maps it has stored + the flow reading from the AMM to run the car, and will use the O2 reading to make corrections to the maps if nessecary.

When the ECU sees an air-flow that is higher than the highest allowable number in the ECU closed-loop map (usually happens when the reading goes above what the ECU thinks is ~3psi of boost) the ECU goes in to open-loop. It will then make use of the air/fuel targets it has to run the engine. Since the ECU knows how much fuel is required to make an AFR of 14.7 on (x) amount of air-flow over the AMM and (y) amount of rpm, it can easy calculate how much further it has to extend the pulsewidth of the injectors to reach its target AFR (ideally ~12.5:1 to 12.0:1) at all air-flows and rpm´s. Basic mathematics.

The ECU sends out a load signal to the EZK which is composed from the AMM signal and modified by the chip in the ECU. Since the EZK knows the rpm it can advance/retard timing in reference to the load signal. How much the advance/retard should be is determined by what is written in the chip of the EZK for rpm vs. load.

If the EZK sense ping/knock it will retard the ignition by an amount governed by the amplitude and frequency of ping/knock. A casual ping or weak pingning means a little ignition retard, and more pingning or louder pinging means more ignition retard. When the EZK don´t hear pinging anymore it will try to advance the ignition again. The EZK will learn to handle the small pinging and adapt to it. If the EZK determines that it has done all it can to counteract pinging (if it has retarded the ignition more than the allowed value) it will send a signal to the ECU to enrich the fuel mixture to stop the pinging. Once again the same pattern is shown, the more pinging, the more fuel is told to be added. When the EZK doesn´t sense ping anymore it will try to decrease the signal to the ECU to lean the mixture out again.

* Exceptions, see bottom of this text.

When EZK pulls timing and LH2.4 adds more fuel it is often very noticeable as a decrease in power.

The rev limit is set at ~6300rpm. When the ECU reach 6300rpm it will shut down the injectors until the engine speed has dropped a few percent, it then enables the injectors again.

The engine fan is controlled by the ECU (and on some cars by relays) and has 2 speeds. The engine cooling fan operates at low-speed if coolant temperature is above 102°C. The engine cooling fan also operates at low-speed if the A/C-system pressure is greater than 17 bar on the high pressure side and the speed of the car is below 100kph. The engine cooling fan operates at high-speed if the engine coolant temperature (ECT-sensor) is above 115°C or the pressure in the A/C-system high pressure side exceeds 22 bar. The engine cooling fan always starts at low-speed for approximately 15 seconds before it can operate at high-speed. It always runs at low-speed for 5 seconds when it stops operating at high-speed. If the ignition is turned off when the fan is operating at high-speed it will continue at low-speed for 5 seconds. So as not to overload the engine there is a delay which prevents the fan from starting for 9 seconds after the engine has been started, no matter what the engine temperature or A/C-system pressure. To cool the engine and avoid overheating, the engine cooling fan will continue to operate at low-speed for three minutes if engine temperature exceeds 105°C when the ignition is switched off.

Acceleration:

During sudden positive throttle changes you will need to have more fuel for two reasons. Reason one being that when the pressure in the intake manifold changes, the fuel will condense on the runners of the manifold and in the head, causing a leaner condition. Reason two being that the engine needs more fuel to be resistant to ping and also to give a smooth transition into the power level you want. The ECU sees both a sudden change in the O2 reading (lean) as well as a sudden change in the AMM reading (more flow) and activates acceleration enrichment. The load signal to the EZK is also changed in a way to show the EZK that the throttle plate has suddenly opened and that it has to correct for that.

Deceleration:

When decelerating the ECU still has to meet the emission laws and on light deceleration it will still try to keep stoichiometric mixture.

When the throttle plate is closed (and the TPS switch is closed), the rpm is over 2000, the ECU shuts down the injectors to save fuel, to save the environment and to give more effective engine braking.

The ECU returns to normal running condition at approximately 1400-2000 rpm, depending on engine temperature.

Some ECU´s also make use of the speed signal from rear axle to determine wether or not to use deceleration mode. If the speed or both the speed and rpm is under a certain value it will not use deceleration mode.

A look at the stock ECU:

The maps in the stock chip will only reach to ~6300rpm and 10psi of boost (7psi stock + 30-40% of adaptability) on a stock car. After that the chip will guess (and interpolate) the values.

The maps and routines in the stock chip are there to run the car and also pass emission testing even if it is under very difficult conditions like dirty injectors, clogged fuel filter, carbon builup in the head, bad oil and extreme heat and cold on top of that. To keep the car running problem-free the resulting HP of the B230FT (to name one example) is 165HP. The maps are not even near to being optimal for maximal performance. The maps are basically made to be emissions friendly and fuel saving. They are not for performance at all.

The acceleration enrichment is made for 7-10psi only.

A look at the chipped ECU:

By chipping the ECU the maps are extended as far as the A/D converters can read. This means that the chip will use all the resources in the ECU and its sensors. The chip will have maps for as much as the ECU´s components are capable of (virtually unlimited if you have the right hardware connected to the ECU).

The acceleration enrichment is made for as much as the A/D converters can read and are more refined to give better driveability.

The routines for how the ECU should handle different load situations and transitions are performance oriented.

The AFR targets are altered for performance, driveability and power and is much more efficient than the stock chip.

The load signal sent to the EZK is also altered and refined.

Overall it will not use more or less fuel than the stock chip. But remeber that to make power you need more fuel and boost so if you have a heavy right foot it will of course consume more fuel.

The stock injectors max out at a little over 15psi and the AMM max out a little bit later, so that is the limit of the hardware in a stock car that has been chipped. The limit is not in the ECU itself. If you want even more power you will have to use larger injectors and a larger AMM in conjunction with your other upgrades.

Since the chip has extended the maps to the limit but the size is still 16x16 cells, the increments between the numbers in the cells are larger than stock. But this doesn´t mean that it is any more crude or have noticeable less resolution than the stock chip.

A look at the stock EZK:

The maps in the stock chip will only reach to ~6300rpm and 10psi of boost (7psi stock + 30-40% of adaptability) on a stock car. After that the chip will guess (and interpolate) the values.

The stock EZK has base maps targeted at giving maximum performance (maximum ignition advance) at ~87-89 octane (~91-93 octane EU). This means that you will not gain any power or driveability from running higher octane than that (on stock boost) since the ignition will be at the maximum allowed advance by the chip already at 89 octane. It is still safer to run higher octane though, since the car will then be more resistant to pinging if you should run in to such conditions requiring it, and then the EZK will not have to retard the timing.

The stock ignition map is not nearly advanced enough to give a pleasant driving experience (relatively speaking). In some areas it is a lot more retarded than it has to be and torque in some important areas of the powerband is lower than it should be.

Once again, the stock chip is only there for the reasons I pointed out in the "A look at the stock ECU" section.

A look at the chipped EZK:

Even in the EZK the maps are extended as far as the A/D converters can read. Only one thing is extended, and that is the portion of the map that refers to the load signal coming from the ECU (and that is the only limit). There are no other limits in the EZK that will have to change to get better performance and driveability since it is more simple than the fuel ECU. The EZK reads rpm vs. load and handles the temperature and knock sensor, so the only limit is the load signal which has been extended to its maximum.

The routines for how the EZK should handle different load situations and transitions are performance oriented.

The EZK chip has base maps targeted at giving maximum performance (maximum ignition advance) at 92-93 octane (98 octane EU). That means that the ignition will be at the maximum allowed advance by the chip at 93 octane. It is still safer to run higher octane though, since the car will then be more resistant to pinging if you should run in to such conditions requiring it, and then the EZK will not have to retard the timing.

By optimising the chip for 93 octane, it can run more ignition advance. Because of that you will gain power and the fuel consumption will be lower.

The ignition is as advanced as it can be across the entire range and does not have the "patches" of too litlle ignition advance as the stock chip does.

The enrichment signal sent to the ECU is also altered and refined.

Since the chip has extended the maps to the limit but the size is still 16x16 cells, the increments between the numbers in the cells are larger than stock. But this doesn´t mean that it is any more crude or have noticeable less resolution than the stock chip.

"Check engine light - CEL and limp-home mode":

Limp-home mode is the protective mode that the ECU reverts back to when something is faulty to protect the engine. When the ECU is in limp-home mode the ECU/EZK use a base map that is very rich and the ignition is retarded a lot. This is just for getting home to fix the problem, or to and from the Volvo dealer or the shop who will fix the problem for you.

The reason that the CEL comes on has many reasons. The main reasons will be explained here.

If the ECU/EZK chip is faulty or has a bad checksum in the software it will light the CEL and go into limp-home mode.

If the ECU/EZK has a problem (something broke) it will light the CEL and go into limp-home mode.

If the ECU has reached its adapting limits (if it is running too lean or too rich and can´t adjust it) it will light the CEL and go into limp-home mode.

If a vital component is broken or disconnected from the ECU/EZK it will light the CEL and go into limp-home mode.

The OBD system:

OBD stands for "On Board Diagnostics".

Many of the LH2.4 cars have a test-socket from which you can read the fault-codes of the ECU, EZK and TCU. The later model cars (1995-1998 940) has a serial interface instead of a test socket in which the VST-tool or an OBDII reader is supposed to plug in to read the fault-codes.

The LH2.4 ECU costantly monitors the following things:

-The control module's own, internal functions.
-Heated oxygen sensor (HO2S) and fuel trim.
-Engine coolant temperature sensor.
-Mass air flow (MAF) sensor.
-Battery voltage.
-Throttle position switch (TP switch).
-Engine speed (RPM) signal from the engine control module (ECM).
-Speedometer signal.
-Knock enrichment signal from the ignition system (does not apply to B 230 F, B 204 FT/GT).
-The idle air control (IAC) valve.

A fault in any of these functions is presented as a diagnostic trouble code (DTC) in diagnostic test mode (DTM) 1.

The EZK116 constantly monitors the following things:

-The control module's own, internal functions.
-Knock sensor (KS) signal.
-Fuel system load signal.
-Timing pick-up signal.
-Temperature sensor signal.
-Signal from the EGR converter.
-Signal from the EGR temperature sensor.

A fault in any of these functions is presented as a diagnostic trouble code (DTC) in test function 1.

All the diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs) are reversible. This means that if a signal has resulted in a diagnostic trouble code (DTC) being stored and it is OK next time the ignition is turned on, the control module will use the programmed correct value instead of remaining in “limp-home” mode. But the diagnostic trouble code (DTC) remains stored in the memory.

Diagnostic Test Mode 1: Fault Code Retrieval.

* Place the cable into socket 2 (LH2.4 fuel injection test) or 6 (EZK116 ignition test).
* Turn the ignition ON to KPII without starting the engine.
* Select Mode 1 by pressing the button once and holding for more than 1 second but less than 3 seconds.
* The LED lamp will flash in successive series of three digits followed by a three-second pause. If there are no fault codes stored, it will flash 1-1-1 indicating the fuel injection system is operating correctly.
* Count the successive flashes and record the fault code.
* Press the button again.
* Record the fault code. If it is the same as the previous one, then no additional codes are stored. Repeat until all the codes stored are retrieved (maximum of three). If the car is from California you can read up to 17 fault-codes at the same time.
* Refer to the tables below for the interpretation of fault codes from the LH2.4 Fuel injection System and EZK 116 Ignition System.
* Move the cable into socket 6 (for ignition codes from EZK116) or socket 2 (for fuel injection codes from LH2.4) and repeat the above.

Erasing Fault Codes.

After you have retrieved all the Fault Codes in the steps above, you should erase the system memory.

* Repeat the steps above and read the fault codes again.
* Press and hold the button for more than five seconds, then release it.
* When the LED lights, press the button again for more than five seconds and release. If the LED goes off, then the memory is cleared.
* To test that memory is cleared, press the button again for >1 second and <3 seconds. If code 1-1-1 is returned, then the memory is cleared.
* Repeat the steps above with the other cable position mode (2 or 6) to erase LH2.4 or EZK116 codes.

Diagnostic Test Mode 2: System Sensor Signal Test.

This test is made to know whether signals are received from certain sensors and switches.

* For vehicles equipped with air conditioning, turn the a/c control to "on."
* Turn the ignition ON to KPII and install the cable into socket 6 for ignition-related tests.
* Press the button two times for >1 and <3 seconds each. The LED lamp should flash.
* Check the throttle position switch by turning the throttle pivot wheel slightly from within the engine compartment. The LED should go out and then flash code 3-3-4 which indicates proper operation of the TPS. If no code is flashed and the lamp keeps flashing, the TPS is faulty.
* After the tests, the LED should keep flashing.
* Crank the starter motor. The LED should go out, then flash 1-4-1 for the RPM sensor. If no code is flashed and the lamp keeps flashing, the RPM sensor is faulty.
* Install the cable into socket 2 for fuel injection-related tests.
* Press the button two times for >1 and <3 seconds each. The LED lamp should flash.
Activate the following sensors. If the LED diagnostic code shown (note: this is not a fault code) is present then the sensor or component is OK:

TPS OK in full load position (when throttle is moved), 3-3-3.
TPS OK in idle position (when throttle is moved), 3-3-2.
RPM sensor signal from ignition OK, 3-3-1.
A/C control on/off OK (when a/c switch is depressed or released), 1-1-4.
A/C compressor start OK, 1-3-4.
Engine idle speed compensation for automatic transmission OK, 1-2-4 (depress the brake pedal, move the selector to D and then to N).

* Exit Mode 2 by switching off the ignition.

Diagnostic Test Mode 3: Injection System Component Activation Test.

*Turn the ignition ON to KPII and install the cable into socket 2 for fuel-injection-related tests.
* Press the button three times for one second each time (waiting between >1 and <3 seconds before pressing again).
* The diagnostic unit then tests selected components: engine coolant fan (if equipped), fuel injectors, idle air control solenoid valve, carbon filter solenoid valve (if equipped), cold start valve, radio suppression relay and fuel pump, each of which you can hear or feel.
* Exit by switching off the ignition.

Alternate Diagnostic Test Mode 3: EGR System Component Activation Test (if equipped).
* Turn the ignition ON to KPII and install the cable into socket 6 to test the EGR system controller.
* Press the button three times for one second each time (waiting between >1 and <3 seconds before pressing again).
* The diagnostic unit then tests the EGR system controller which you can hear or feel.
* Exit by switching off the ignition.

LH2.4 Fuel Injection Fault Codes (DTC):

Socket position 2.

(The * means that the CEL is lit)

1-1-1 No faults detected.
1-1-2 Fault in control module.
1-1-3* Short-term fuel trim. Faulty control. Fuel trim (lambda control) too lean or rich.
1-2-1* Mass air flow (MAF) sensor signal. Faulty signal to/from Air Mass Meter.
1-2-3* Engine coolant temperature (ECT) sensor. Signal missing to/from coolant temp. sensor.
1-3-1 Engine speed signal from ignition system. Signal missing.
1-3-2 Battery voltage. Battery voltage too low/high.
1-3-3 Throttle position (TP) switch at engine idle. Throttle switch idle setting faulty or grounding fault.
2-1-2* Heated oxygen sensor (HO2S) signal. Faulty or missing signal.
2-1-3 Throttle position (TP) switch at full load. Faulty or missing signal.
2-2-1* Long-term fuel trim, part load. Lean part load.
2-2-3 Idle air control (IAC) valve signal. Faulty or missing signal.
2-3-1* Fuel trim (lambda control) too lean or too rich at part load.
2-3-2* Fuel trim (lambda control) too lean or too rich at idle.
3-1-1 Vehicle speed signal (VSS). Faulty or missing signal. (Also signal from speedometer).
3-1-2 Knock enrichment signal from ignition system. Faulty signal.
3-2-2 Mass air flow sensor (MAF). Air Mass Meter wire burn-off signal absent or faulty.
3-4-4 Exhaust gas temperature sensor. Faulty.

EZK 116 Ignition Fault Codes (DTC):

Socket position 6.

(The * means that the CEL is lit)

1-1-1 No faults detected.
1-4-2* Fault in control module.
1-4-3* Knock sensor (KS) signal. Faulty or missing signal.
1-4-4* Load signal. Faulty or missing signal.
1-5-4* EGR. EGR system flow too high.
2-1-4 Engine speed (RPM) sensor. Intermittently absent.
2-2-4 Engine coolant temperature (ECT) sensor. Faulty or missing signal.
2-3-4 Throttle position (TP) switch signal. Faulty or missing signal.
2-4-1* EGR (NTC). EGR system flow too low.
2-4-1* EGR (PTC). EGR system flow too low.
4-1-3* EGR temperature sensor signal (NTC). Faulty or missing signal.
4-1-3* EGR temperature sensor signal (PTC). Faulty or missing signal.

Special Fault Codes (DTC):

ABS Fault Codes (DTC):

Socket position 3.

1–1–1 No fault detected
1–2–5 Faulty signal from at least one wheel sensor
1–3–5 Fault in control module
1–4–2 Brake light switch, open circuit
1–5–1 L/H front wheel sensor, open or short–circ. to supply
1–5–2 R/H front wheel sensor, open or short–circ. to supply
1–5–5 Rear axle sensor, open or short–circ. to supply
2–1–5 Valve relay, open–circuit or short–circuit
2–3–1 L/H front wheel sensor, signal absent
2–3–2 R/H front wheel sensor, signal absent
2–3–5 Rear axle sensor, signal absent
4–1–1 L/H front wheel valve, open or short–circ.
4–1–3 R/H front wheel valve, open or short–circ.
4–1–5 Rear valve open or short–circ.
4–4–3 Pump motor/relay electrical or mechanical fault

TCU Fault Codes (DTC):

Socket position 5.

2-4-2 Turbo control valve. Open-circuit or shorted.
3-1-2 Knocking information. Signal faulty.
3-4-2 A/C blocking relay. Signal faulty.
4-2-1 Pressure sensor. Faulty boost pressure.
4-2-2 Exhaust gas temperature controller. Signal faulty.
4-2-3 Throttle position sensor. Signal faulty.
4-2-4 Load signal. Signal faulty.
4-3-1 Temperature sensor. Signal missing.

Exceptions of some engines:

The B204FT and B204GT are somewhat different than the other engines. It still uses LH2.4 and all of its functions, but works a little different.

The B204FT and B204GT have some extra hardware. An EGT-sensor (for sensing the exhaust temperature), a TCU (turbo control unit for adjusting boost pressure) with a built-in MAP-sensor (for sensing boost pressure), and a variable TPS (throttle position sensor) just like the ones found in late 240´s with LH3.1 and all FWD cars from the 850 and up.

The AMM on B200G, B204E, B230G, B230GT, B234G and B204GT engines have an adjustment screw for setting CO when the engine is idling. This has been omitted on the other engines as the oxygen sensor control is adaptive throughout its range.

The EGT sensor senses the exhaust temperature and sends a signal to the fuel ECU, which gradually increases the injection pulsewidth when the exhaust temperature reach a critical level (approximately 950°C). This contributes to a lower combustion temperature which in turn reduces the exhaust gas temperature, after which the increased fuel supply stops when the exhaust gas temperature has reached a normal level.

Function of the TCU:



The TCU controls the turbocharger boost pressure, electric cooling fans and climate control AC-compressor.

The variable TPS on the B204FT and B204GT engines provides the TCU with information on the throttle angle. This is to counteract turbo lag and also to give a certain amount of boost for a given throttle input.

The TCU reads the boost pressure via the built-in MAP sensor. It also reads the rpm (from the fuel ECU), the ECT-sensor (engine temperature), the speed from the vehicle speed sensor and the signals from the A/C pressure switches.

The TCU sends a signal to the fuel ECU about idle air trim when the engine cooling fan runs at high-speed when the engine is idling.

The TCU disconnects the A/C-compressor when there is a high load on the engine such as during acceleration.

The B204FT and B204GT engines use the knock-sensing circuit just like the rest of the LH2.4 cars, but uses it differently. When the EZK sense knock/ping it will adjust, but if the EZK determines that it has done all it can to counteract pinging (if it has retarded the ignition more than the allowed value) it will send a signal to the TCU instead of the fuel ECU. The signal from the EZK tells the TCU to lower boost pressure. Once again the same pattern is shown, the more pinging, the more the boost is lowered. When the EZK doesn´t sense ping anymore it will try to decrease the signal to the TCU to raise the boost again.



Q: So... what do you have cookin' right now?

A: Some changes to the current chips and/or new chips will be released very soon. This includes:

* Chips with a higher rev limit. Probably somewhere around 6750rpm.

* Chips optimized for E85 (both fuel and ignition chips of course).

* Chips to run very large injectors and AMM. Think 50lb/hr+... That will be nice for all of you that plan to run very high boost levels.

* A daughterboard for both the ECU and the EZK to run two sets of chips. Switchable tables for gas/E85 or similar...

* A mod-kit for all unchippable EZK boxes, making them chippable. (I guess that this is something many people on the board desire...)



Q: I need some schematics for LH2.4. Can you supply me with that? And do you have any other interesting schematics?

A: Yes, I have some schematics that may come in handy while you are digging under the dash and in the engine bay. I also have some schematics for the rare models, and some other odd and additional functions that may be interesting.

Volvo 940, B230FT, 1995-1998:

(Can also be used for pre-1995 models of 940 and 740 with B230FT)

ECU:


EZ116K:


Instrument cluster:


Volvo 960, B204FT, 1991-1994:

(For most people installing a B204FT engine or a custom setup B230FT+16v engine, these may come in handy for rewiring)

ECU:


EZ116K:


TCU:


B204FT e-fan (not the same setup as B230FT e-fan):


B204FT ECC (not the same setup as B230FT ECC):


Other rare functions:

(May come in handy for other use than originally intended)

Diesel preheating, D24TIC:


Overload (overboost) sensor, D24TIC:


Exhaust temperature sensor (warning sensor), not the same as EGT sensor on B204FT:




Q: Do you have a pinout list for the LH2.4 ECU's?

A: Yes. Here you will find a list with the pin name and voltages and/or the logical function.

The pinout may differ between models, years and what kind of accessories and equipment the car came with.

ECU pinout list:


EZ116K pinout list:


ECU:

1: Engine speed signal input 6.5 - cranking, >8 - idle
2: TPS signal input 0.2 - Idle speed, 4 - Full load
3: TPS signal secondary input 1.0 - Idling, 10 - Full load
4: Power supply +30 input 12
5: Signal Ground 0.0 - Separate from power ground
6: Mass air flow 0.0 - Separate from power ground
7: Mass air flow input 2.0 - Idling, 5.0 - Full Load
8: Mass air flow, burn-off Output 4.0 - At burn-off, 0 -otherwise
9: Power supply from main input 12
10: Low-speed pressure sensor, engine cooling fan
11: A/C Time-delay Relay, High-speed pressure sensor, engine cooling fan
12: Diagnostics lead I/O
13: Temp Sensor input 4(-20C) -0.5(80C)
14: A/C, ACC load Signal input 12-Auto, 0-ECON
15: Jumper for cold start 0-no cold start, 12 cold start
16: Diagnostics Lead I/O
17: Chassis Ground
18: Injectors control signal Output 7.1Hz, 2.4-4.5ms
19: EGR Valve Output 12 - inactivated, <12 active
20: Fuel Pump relay signal 1-activ, 12-Ign on
21: Main relay operating circuit Output 1 - Ignition on, 12 - Ignition off
22: Check Engine Light Output 12-off, 1-on
23: EGR Temp Sensor input 4.5 -EGR closed, <4.5 -Open
24: Oxygen Sensor input 0.6 - 1.0 - Rich, 0.0 - 0.4 - Lean
25: Load Signal Tq EZK/DI Output Freq incr with throttle opening
26: Shift-Up light Output 12 - Not activated,0 - Activated
27: EVAP Canister purge valve Output 12 - Open, 1 - Closed
28: PRE-IGNition, DI/APC input 0-Preign, 6.5-stable, 12-knock
* Turbo+ Knock enrichment, trigger
* (B204FT/GT TCU) EGT sensor, trigger
29: Codification input 12 - Automatic transmission
30: Raising engine idle speed input 12-R,D,1,2,3, 0 - P,N, and manual
31: Consumption signal to EDU Output Freq incr with throttle opening
32: Cold start valve Output Battery voltage - Not activated
33: IAC valve Output 5-11 - Idling, no load
34: Speed Sensor input 6 -Rotating, 0 or 12 - Stationary
35: Power Supply +15 input 12-Ign on

EZ116K:

1: OBD diagnostic socket (in some markets: serial interface)
2: Coolant temp sensor
3: Check Engine Light output, shared with ECU pin 22. Signals: 12-off, 1-on
4: PRE-IGNition, output to ECU pin 28. Signals: 0-Preign, 6.5-stable, 12-knock
5: 12v supply, constant
6: 12v supply, switched
7: Throttle idle switch
8: Load Signal Tq, from ECU pin 25
9:
10: Engine speed sensor
11: Engine speed sensor (shield)
12: Knock sensor (shield)
13: Knock sensor
14: EGR, Ground connector on engine (power ground)
15: EGR, converter, control
16: Igntion amplifier drive, trigger
17: Engine speed signal output. Signals: 6.5-cranking, >8-idle
18: Selector wire. Signals: 5v-disabled, grounded-enabled
19: Selector wire. Signals: 5v-disabled, grounded-enabled
20: Ground connector on engine (signal ground)
21:
22: EGR, temperature sensor
23: Engine speed sensor
24:
25:

TCU (740 and 960 with B204FT/GT):

1: Turbo control valve (boost solenoid)
2:
3: OBD diagnostic socket
4: Relay, engine cooling fan, Control module ECC, ECU Pin 15
5: Relay, engine cooling fan
6: Blocking relay A/C
7: Throttle position (TP) switch/TP sensor
8: Throttle position (TP) switch/TP sensor
9: Temperature sensor TCU
10: Exhaust gas temperature sensor
11: High-speed pressure sensor, engine cooling fan
12: Low-speed pressure sensor, engine cooling fan
13: Combined instrument, speed sensor
14: Load Signal Tq, from ECU pin 25
15: 12v supply, constant
16:
17:
18:
19:
20: Ground connector on engine (signal ground)
21: Ground connector on engine (signal ground)
22:
23: 12v supply, switched
24: Throttle position (TP) switch/TP sensor, ground
25: Temperature sensor TCU, ground
26:
27:
28:
29:
30: PRE-IGNition, DI/APC Pin 4 input 0-Preign, 6.5-stable, 12-knock
31:
32:
33:
34:
35:



Q: What kind of ECU's are there for the naturally aspirated cars, and which one will fit in my car?

A: Since many have asked about this, I have made a list.

LH2.2

240 (P242, P244, P245) - 2.3 i CAT 08.86-07.93 115HP B230F

LH2.2 (Fuel ECU):

0 280 000 554 (Replacement for 0 280 000 544)
0 280 000 544 (Replacement for 0 280 000 511)
0 280 000 511
0 986 261 737 - recon. part
(Volvo p/n: 3517011, 1389094, 5003707)

EZ 117 K (Ignition ECU):

***

----------------------------------------------------------------

740 Saloon (744) - 2.3 08.87-07.92 115HP B230F

LH2.2 (Fuel ECU):

***

EZ 117 K (Ignition ECU):

***

----------------------------------------------------------------

LH2.4

240 (P242, P244, P245) - 2.3 i CAT 08.86-07.93 115HP B230F

LH2.4 (Fuel ECU):

0 280 000 561
0 986 261 104 - recon. part
(LH2.4.1 - Volvo p/n: 5003782, 3517407, 9146578)

EZ 116 K (Ignition ECU):

0 227 400 140 - EGR
0 227 400 146
0 227 400 162 - EGR
0 227 400 169
0 227 400 209 - EGR
0 986 262 304 - recon. part, EGR

----------------------------------------------------------------

740 (744, 745) - 2.0 08.89-07.91 112HP B200F

LH2.4 (Fuel ECU):

0 280 000 590
0 986 261 758 - recon. part
(LH2.4.1 - Volvo p/n: 3531206, 5003771)

0 280 000 594
0 986 261 760 - recon. part
(LH2.4.1 - Volvo p/n: 3531831)

EZ 116 K (Ignition ECU):

0 227 400 176

----------------------------------------------------------------

740 (744, 745) - 2.3 08.87-07.92 115HP B230F

LH2.4 (Fuel ECU):

0 280 000 935
0 986 261 811 - recon. part
(LH2.4.4 - Volvo p/n: 3547777, 5003835)

0 280 000 561
0 986 261 104 - recon. part
(LH2.4.1 - Volvo p/n: 3517407, 9146578)

0 280 000 951
0 986 261 817 - recon. part
(LH2.4.2 - Volvo p/n: 5003926, 6842115, 9146223)

0 986 262 713 - recon. part (NOTE: Newer LH2.4.4 replacement)
(LH2.4.4 - Volvo p/n: 5003926, 9146223)

EZ 116 K (Ignition ECU):

0 227 400 146
0 227 400 169 - EGR
0 986 262 304 - recon. part, EGR

----------------------------------------------------------------

940 (944, 945) - 2.0 01.92-07.94 112HP B200F

LH2.4 (Fuel ECU):

0 280 000 936
0 986 261 812 - recon. part
0 986 262 704 - recon. part
(LH2.4.4 - Volvo p/n: 3547779, 5003836)

0 280 000 949
(LH2.4.4 - Volvo p/n: 6842289)

EZ 116 K (Ignition ECU):

0 227 400 176

----------------------------------------------------------------

940 / 940 Mk II (944, 945) - 2.3 08.92-07.95 116HP B230FD

LH2.4 (Fuel ECU):

0 280 000 943
(LH2.4.4 - Volvo p/n: 6842056, 8601039, 9146794)

0 280 000 946
0 986 262 712 - recon. part
(LH2.4.4 - Volvo p/n: 1275762, 8251084, 3507179, 8601150, 9146221, 9146847)

EZ 116 K (Ignition ECU):

0 227 400 196 - Automatic gearbox
0 227 400 231 - Manual gearbox

----------------------------------------------------------------

940 / 940 Mk II (944) - 2.3 08.90-07.95 131HP B230FB

LH2.4 (Fuel ECU):

0 280 000 934
(LH2.4.4 - Volvo p/n: 243315, 5001281, 6842288)

0 280 000 935 - A/C equipped vehicles
0 986 261 811 - recon. part
(LH2.4.4 - Volvo p/n: 3547777, 5003835)

EZ 116 K (Ignition ECU):

0 227 400 175



Q: Since you now also offer NA 8v chips, can you then tell me more about them?

A: The package consists of two chips. One for the fuel ECU and one for the EZK, just like the other LH2.4 chip packages.

Only the 951 fuel ECU is supported. Any EZK can be used (as long as its chippable of course).

Will give you up to 10-15HP on a stock car (B230F). The chips are made to make use of the upgrades you can make to a naturally aspirated engine.

The setup we really had in mind was something like this:

* 531 head and/or port work.
* Better cam than the M.
* Good exhaust.
* Better intake piping.
* Pretty high compression. 10-ish or a little more.

The chips are tuned for use with a B230FB / FX with some modifications. So these are made for it. It will of course give a bigger power increase on the B230FB and B230FX with some modifications, than on a B230F that is nearly stock.

They will work on the B230F as well of course. It has all been extensively tested.

The NA 8v chips will do what the turbo chips and the NA 16v chips do.

* The right AFR's under all load conditions for best power and efficiency.

* Correct acceleration enrichment.

* As advanced ignition timing as possible under all load conditions.



But... this is different from the turbo chips (NA 16v chips included in the following text):

The NA chips are optimised for 95/96 octane EU (91-92 octane US).

Why?

Because if it was optimised for 98/99 octane EU (94+ octane US), the NA cars would ping under normal load conditions if filled up with 91 or 92 octane.

A turbo engine would not do that. It would just be limited in how much boost it could run. It all has to do with the VE as a naturally aspirated engine. A turbo engine has a turbo shoved up its rear and then the VE out of boost will be lower than the naturally aspirated engine. The compression ratio (both SCR and DCR) and cam also has a lot to do with it.

Of course the turbo engine would also ping when not in boost if the octane was low enough, but the turbo engine has a higher safety margin against ping due to what I said above.



Q: I have EGR in my car, and for some reason (the old ones are broken, upgrading, etc. etc.) I want to replace my ECU and EZK. I do not want to have the check engine light lit. Which EZK and ECU do I have to choose?

A: The ECU has nothing to do with the EGR function. The EZK is the one that reads the EGR temp sensor and actuates the EGR valve. The EZK is the only box that have to support EGR. Look at the ECU/EZK list higher up in this post.

As an extra piece of information: The ECU is in many cases different if it comes from an EGR equipped car. As you can see from the ECU list, there are some numbers that are listed as EGR ECU's. The only thing that is different about them though, is that they have just a slightly different fuel map to get the car to run smoother without hickups when the EGR system is enabled (at low load cruising and/or at idle). An ECU listed as EGR-specific will not affect the performance of your car if it is used in a car without EGR.



Q: My car has EGR and I want to get rid of it. What do I do?

A: My chips will disable the EGR function so that you can remove the EGR hardware without a problem. Or you can get a non-EGR EZK since they will not trigger the check engine light.



Q: Which NA ECU's and EZK's can I match, and can I get better performance with a certain combination?

A: Coming soon...



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Last edited by frpe82; 03-03-2009 at 06:41 PM..
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Old 12-06-2006, 08:05 PM   #2
frpe82
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All threads, info and FAQ is back.

Yep... Now I have worked my ass off and all the threads that got lost or f-ed up in the crash or outdated in the backup are now redone and updated with the latest info.

So the "Chips for redblocks", "Feedback: Chips for redblocks", "Chipping FAQ" and "Converting to E85 (ethanol fuel)" are now back again in full glory.

And yes... I have backups of them all.

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Old 12-28-2006, 01:38 PM   #3
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Thread update today, and bump

Anything else we should add to the FAQ that might be of interest to the others? I know you have more questions than this.
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Old 12-29-2006, 03:37 PM   #4
Dragonfly1873
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what are the advantages over chiping compared to ms&s ecu? i know that with the new ECU thiers lots of programing but are the end result HP to far off?
__________________
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1988 765 turbo, MBC 15psi, Water injection, now with a lc-1 wideband o2
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Old 12-29-2006, 05:56 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dragonfly1873 View Post
what are the advantages over chiping compared to ms&s ecu? i know that with the new ECU thiers lots of programing but are the end result HP to far off?
On a stock car the only thing you have to do is to install the chips + an MBC set at 15psi (a calibrated boost gauge is also recommended). Then you can enjoy up to 220HP without caring about anything else. No tuning or hassle. Simple as that.

On a stock car the HP and torque figures are very similar between LH2.4 and MS since the chips I sell are as agressive as possible on the stock hardware.

The chips will support a lot of changes and a lot of HP if you configure the hardware right. But if you have a setup that is very different from stock and want to configure it to 100% then MS (or any other aftermarket EMS) is the way to go.
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Old 12-30-2006, 02:45 PM   #6
lammmy
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Here's a question about installing the chips. I have the lh 2.2 sitting here just waiting to be installed, but I'm a little scared about opening the box. I have it out, but I'm not sure how to actually open the ECU. I see two screws and about 6 metal tabs.

Do I pull back the tabs with a screwdriver, or loosen the screws, or both?

EDIT: I bit the bullet and pulled the tabs back, turns out, that is correct, the cover pops off and then the two screws are what hold the actual board to the case. Undo those and then the 1 smaller screw near the main ECU connector (where it plugs into the wiring harness) and the circuit board will pop right out. It doesn't look so bad now that its open.

Whats the easiest way to solder the actual socket in there? do you just use the existing solder that is already on the board and run your iron along it until the feet slide in?

Last edited by lammmy; 12-30-2006 at 03:51 PM.. Reason: Tried it
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Old 12-30-2006, 05:00 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lammmy View Post
Here's a question about installing the chips. I have the lh 2.2 sitting here just waiting to be installed, but I'm a little scared about opening the box. I have it out, but I'm not sure how to actually open the ECU. I see two screws and about 6 metal tabs.

Do I pull back the tabs with a screwdriver, or loosen the screws, or both?

EDIT: I bit the bullet and pulled the tabs back, turns out, that is correct, the cover pops off and then the two screws are what hold the actual board to the case. Undo those and then the 1 smaller screw near the main ECU connector (where it plugs into the wiring harness) and the circuit board will pop right out. It doesn't look so bad now that its open.

Whats the easiest way to solder the actual socket in there? do you just use the existing solder that is already on the board and run your iron along it until the feet slide in?
This is not really specific to chipping, but I can answer it anyway.

Remove the solder on the board with a desoldering pump or desoldering wick. Put the component (or socket in your case) in the hole or on the island on the board. Solder with new solder and a clean soldering iron.
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Old 12-31-2006, 12:43 AM   #8
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Thanks man, I'm fairly confident usually, but usually thats in school that I have soldered, and I knew you would have some tips, since you are obviously experienced in the area. Once again, thanks and keep up the good work. I will post in the feed for chips once finished.
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Old 01-02-2007, 03:41 PM   #9
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Holy cow Batman! A major update was made to my article.

What has been added today:
* How LH2.4 works (simplified version)
* LH2.4 fault-codes and how to test and handle them.
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Old 01-02-2007, 04:47 PM   #10
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very cool, like the updated explanation for how it all works
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Old 01-02-2007, 10:46 PM   #11
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SWEET wish we had a rep system for good contributions . . . .
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Old 02-09-2007, 09:39 AM   #12
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Hello,
What is the cost of a chip for my 960 2.0 16V Turbo. It is the B204FT engine. Do you have chips for these cars? I live in Luxemburg? Do you ship it here?
Thank You
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Old 02-09-2007, 09:52 AM   #13
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Hello,
What is the cost of a chip for my 960 2.0 16V Turbo. It is the B204FT engine. Do you have chips for these cars? I live in Luxemburg? Do you ship it here?
Thank You
since FRPE82 is not online now i'll answer your questions as good as i can:
yes he sells chips for the 16VT engines. The engine you have is very strong and will support a lot.
He ships to Holland, the USA, the UK and other countries as well, so Luxemburg wont be a problem

see this thread for more info: http://forums.turbobricks.com/showthread.php?t=57781
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Old 02-09-2007, 12:34 PM   #14
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Hello,
What is the cost of a chip for my 960 2.0 16V Turbo. It is the B204FT engine. Do you have chips for these cars? I live in Luxemburg? Do you ship it here?
Thank You
Yes, I ship all over the world.

You can find the price in my thread where I sell the chips.

The B204FT will get 70HP and 55NM extra, but... I now have an updated map for the ignition which will give you an additional 10-15HP (resulting in 80-85HP extra and 65-70NM extra) and much more low rpm power.
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Old 02-09-2007, 01:49 PM   #15
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chip for lh on a b230f n/a?

if this is possible, what would the specs be and how would it get the extra horsepower?
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Old 02-09-2007, 05:05 PM   #16
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chip for lh on a b230f n/a?

if this is possible, what would the specs be and how would it get the extra horsepower?
Yes, chips for B230F, FB, FD, FX exist but they are not often requested.

The power will be +10HP and +15NM (11lb/ft) on a stock car. The power (and powerband) will be much better with a good exhaust, bigger throttle body, better cam etc.

The driveability and feel will be much better and the "sluggishness" will be removed.

Since it is so rare and not included in the group-buy, the price is ~$400.

How will it get the extra horsepower??? What do you mean by that?
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Old 02-09-2007, 05:27 PM   #17
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I don´t know if any of you have noticed it yet, but I have added some more info to the FAQ...




Q: So... what do you have cookin' right now?

A: Some changes to the current chips and/or new chips will be released very soon. This includes:

* Chips for B230FT+16v / B234F+T. With the recommended setup you will have ~300HP. A list of neccesary hardware will be published once the chips are done. A lot more than 300HP is also possible when using bigger/better parts than the recommended setup...

* Chips with a higher rev limit. Probably somewhere around 6750rpm.

* Chips optimized for E85 (both fuel and ignition chips of course).

* Chips to run very large injectors and AMM. Think 50lb/hr+... That will be nice for all of you that plan to run very high boost levels.

* A daughterboard for both the ECU and the EZK to run two sets of chips. Switchable tables for gas/E85 or similar...
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Old 02-09-2007, 11:33 PM   #18
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very nice... what I meant by "how will it get the xtra horsepower" was is is all advancing spark and AFR adjustments and what not?

dumb question anyways... $400 seems a little steep ATM But I like that LH chips are available turdblo or not.
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Old 02-10-2007, 06:47 AM   #19
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very nice... what I meant by "how will it get the xtra horsepower" was is is all advancing spark and AFR adjustments and what not?

dumb question anyways... $400 seems a little steep ATM But I like that LH chips are available turdblo or not.
Yes, the extra power and driveability comes from a better fuel curve with different AFR´s, and from a better ignition curve which is as advanced as it can be on a stock engine.

Expensive...? You do know that I probably have the cheapest chips in the world, right?

Sure... expensive for Turbobricks, and expensive compared to the other chips, and also expensive in relations to $/HP. That I can agree on, so don´t worry.
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Old 02-10-2007, 07:44 AM   #20
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I don´t know if any of you have noticed it yet, but I have added some more info to the FAQ...


* Chips to run very large injectors and AMM. Think 50lb/hr+... That will be nice for all of you that plan to run very high boost levels.
...
Now this is interesting stuf,... With large AMM do you mean 012 or bigger?

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* A daughterboard for both the ECU and the EZK to run two sets of chips. Switchable tables for gas/E85 or similar...
Or switchable between Super-fast & "wife"-modus
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Old 02-10-2007, 08:31 AM   #21
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Or switchable between Super-fast & "wife"-modus
use a EBC
Could be very useful indeed. Stock chips and stock boost or the chips combined with high boost. Maybe thats possible...

I am very interested in the solution for running E85 and normal gas. First i'll experiment with the normal chips, they seem to work great.
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Old 02-10-2007, 03:27 PM   #22
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Now this is interesting stuf,... With large AMM do you mean 012 or bigger?
Yes. Since that will be needed whichever way you go. If you use 50lb/hr+ injectors you shurely must have a power goal in mind that goes beyond the stock AMM.

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Or switchable between Super-fast & "wife"-modus
Hehe

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Originally Posted by JW240 View Post
use a EBC
Could be very useful indeed. Stock chips and stock boost or the chips combined with high boost. Maybe thats possible...
More like tuned chips + stock boost and high boost, and/or the possibilty to switch ignition maps.
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Old 02-10-2007, 09:09 PM   #23
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I meant steep in comparison with the value of the car it's for lol.

its prolly more than 25% the car's worth.

How many people would you need for a GB and what would be savings?
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Old 02-10-2007, 11:15 PM   #24
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I meant steep in comparison with the value of the car it's for lol.

its prolly more than 25% the car's worth.

How many people would you need for a GB and what would be savings?
10 sets of chips (usually 10 buyers, which is stated in the group-buy thread).

And you will save $190 per chip package ($450 regular price, $260 group-buy price) by using the group-buy. Although I am known to be generous and letting people in on the same price if the group-buy just ended and they have decided that they really want it.
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Old 02-11-2007, 01:03 AM   #25
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that would be worth it IMO, to squeeze out some more power in the NA daily driver...

will have a vx cam advanced 4 degreez prolly, along with freer flowing exhaust and what not...

do you mind if I maybe strike up a feeler thread on this?
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