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Old 04-08-2007, 09:18 PM   #1
Alex Buchka
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Default Whiteblock in a 240 - All you need to know

Latest Update: March 4th 2009


IMPORTANT: This thread is old and outdated and has been superseded by THIS article.

PLEASE NOTE: This is very much a work in progress. I have more pictures to throw in around certain places. I have not finished the swap yet, so some information needs to be fleshed out but most of the important info is there.


I've noticed an increase in the number of people asking about whiteblock swaps lately. I have also noticed there is a lot of misinformation surrounding the swap. This guide is mostly to clear up misconceptions and give an idea of what it actually takes to complete the job from start to finish. This will focus on the route which employs the maximum amount of "bolt on" parts to minimize fabrication. Bear in mind, regardless of what people may say, this is not an easy engine swap any way you look at it.

First, some information on what is commonly referred to as the whiteblock:
The whiteblock series of engines is the next generation volvo powerplant after the tried and true SOHC redblock. The engines aren't really white, more like cast aluminum silver. I'm not sure why they are called whiteblocks, maybe the name just sounded cool.

The whiteblock was designed as a modular inline engine in four, five, and six cylinder versions which could all be machined on a common production line to save time and money. Things like waterpumps, oil pumps, valvetrain components, ancillaries, pistons and rods are all common to many different types of whiteblocks. Volvos typical engine codename procedure carries over to the new whiteblocks with one twist. The first digit of the engine code designates the number of cylinders of the engine. For example, the B5254T (found in the S60R/V70R) is a gasoline powered five cylinder with 2.5l of displacement and 4 valves per cylinder.

The five cylinder is the most common type of whiteblock, found in all 850's, S/V70's, S60's, 2.5T S80's and XC90's, and will be the engine mostly focused on in this guide. The procedure for swapping in a six or four cylinder are slightly different and I will cover that under the proper subject.

Five cylinder whiteblocks come in all sorts of configurations, anywhere from 2.0l to 2.5l in displacement with power output anywhere from 126hp to 300hp. The most common high performance whiteblock we are interested in is either the 225hp 850 Turbo engine (B5234T) or the 240hp S70 T5 powerplant (B5234T5). They are quite common, provide a healthy power increase over even a modified turbo redblock, and respond very well to modifications.

What you need:
The following is a list of parts you will need and problems that need to be solved in order to complete the swap. Each part will be followed by an explanation.

A complete engine - this one is fairly obvious. I recommend one of the aforementioned engines from either an 850 or S70. Pre '99 is easier to work with, mostly because of the absence of drive by wire and variable valve timing. I will cover VVT later on in the guide. Prices for a complete engine with harness vary and are all over the map. Some people have paid in excess of $1000 while I managed to get the whole package on a pallet for $450.

Manual Transmission ECU - This one is the trickiest to get state side. Most whiteblocks came with automatic transmissions and ECU's. If you want to run a stickshift (95% of people do), simply disconnecting the automatic transmission from the engine harness with throw trouble codes and put the ECU into "limp home mode". You will need to find an ECU from a stickshifted S70 T5. The 850 did not come with a standard box on the turbo model in the states. All this makes finding the correct ECU quite difficult. There is a rumor that getting a company like iPd to chip an automatic ECU with a stickshift program will alleviate the problem, but this has yet to be confirmed. Tentatively, based on my research so far, I want to say it will NOT work. Of course, if you chose to go with a programmable ECU, all these issues disappear.

ADDENDUM: Doug (Hank Scorpio) has verified that you indeed can get your ECU reflashed by an aftermarket company and in effect transform it into a manual ECU. This costs roughly $700 and will upgrade the performance of your whiteblock considerably. Most "chipping" companies advertise 300-315bhp with a chip and a high flow exhaust.

EricF has confirmed that an automatic ECU is usable as is. The ECU does go into some form of "limp home mode" but this only lowers the boost to the lowest setting if the stock magnetic valve is hooked up. If you substitute this for a manual boost controller or some other form of boost control there will be no other ill effects.

960 Engine mounts - You will need upper engine mounts and the hydraulic rubber pieces from a 960 sedan. The mounting bosses are already present on the five cylinder block and three out of the four holes on each side are threaded. If you are not comfortable drilling into your engine block, it is not absolutely necessary to tap those two holes - the mounts will hold fine with just three proper bolts. If you choose to tap the holes, they already have pilot holes drilled and need to be tapped to M8x1.25 thread.

ADDENDUM: It has been brought to my attention by Doug (Hank Scorpio) that engines after '98 do not have all the bosses present for mounting 960 hardware. If you are looking for the most direct bolt on swap it would be wise to pick up an engine between '94 and '98. Justin (kildea) has a '99 T6 engine that has the bosses present so this post-'98 business only seems to apply to five cylinders.

Lower Engine Mounts - These need to be made from scratch. No kit or bolt on mounts exist. The 960 rubber mounts along with the upper brackets make the engine lean 11 degrees towards the passenger side but place the actual plane of the lower mount surface completely parallel to the ground. The mounts are spaced much wider than the stock redblock mounts and just fit between the frame rails with roughly 1" to spare on each side. In order to clear the sump and to get decent clearance between the head and firewall the engine needs to mount ahead of the cross member.

My mounts are made from 1/8" cold rolled mild steel plate. I cut two pieces roughly 5.5" square and tack welded them to the crossmember right where it meets the frame rails on each side. The driver side plate needs a relief cut to clear the steering shaft. Look at the following pictures and you will see how i did the mounts. There is additional gusseting underneath that is not shown, just to add support. Ignore the boogered welds, they were done blind with a fluxcore welder on badly prepared metal. Since the cross member has been dropped and the mounts have been scrapped in favor of something more elegant yet to be fabricated. I will most likely be scrapping all the 960 hardware and using transmission mount rubber along with something that mounts to the frame rails.




960 Oil Pan
- This is one of the trickiest parts of the entire swap. The stock oil pan from a five cylinder mounted in a FWD configuration will absolutely not clear the crossmember in a 240. It is simply too thick - the sump stretches the entire length of the pan. The 960 however, does have a perfect oil pan with a generous relief for the crossmember and a nice and large rear sump. The 960 is equipped with a six cylinder whiteblock, so the cast aluminum pan needs to be cut, shortened and welded back together in order to fit the shorter five cylinder.

I cut mine on a large bandsaw and TIG welded it back together after clamping it to a hard, flat surface with every C-Clamp I could find. This was done to eliminate warping the pan and necessatating a costly grinding of the sealing surface. After the pan was shortened I had to grind the rear most "rib" off the front of the pan in order to clear the steering rack.

960 Oil Pickup Tube - This is the suction tube that goes from the bottom of the sump to the oil pump inlet. The 850 pickup will not fit since it is a completely different shape. The 960 tube will need to be cut, shortened, and welded back together just like the pan.

960 Dipstick and Dipstick Tube - The 850 dipstick and tube will not fit. The dipstick holes in the 960 and 850 pans are in completely different locations and will not interchange. Also, using a mismatched dipstick would give an incorrect oil level reading.

'99+ ME7 Intake Manifold - If you buy a five cylinder built after '99 you already have this intake manifold, so skip this step. For everyone else, the early five cylinders had a dual runner length intake which 1) is absolutely massive and adds some uneeded weight and 2) effectively places the throttle body inside the firewall. With the throttle body removed, the throttle body flange on the intake manifold lands about 1" from the firewall. Some people have fixed this by welding the hole shut and making a new one on the opposite side. Most of us don't have the resources to do this, so it is easier to get the newer intake manifold which places the throttle body underneath the runners.

ADDENDUM: Since this manifold is paired with a drive-by-wire throttle the bolt pattern is different from a 960 or 850 throttle body. An hour or two with a small piece of 1/2" thick aluminum plate, a hole saw and a tap should result in a handy adapter to make the cable actuated throttle body fit up.

960 Water Transfer Tube - This is the steel tube that connects to the output of the water pump and provides several barbed outputs to the radiator, heater core, turbo, and overflow tank. The 850 tube has the radiator output passing under the exhaust manifold and exiting by the firewall, which makes it completely unsuitable. The 960 version also needs to be shortened, but only the heater core supply line which passes under the exhaust manifold.

ADDENDUM: I was assembling my motor today to fit into a 242 and I actually found that the 960 water transfer tube and exhaust side motor mount attempt to occupy the same space. My solution for this was to cut off the cylinder head return pipe and substitute it with the 850 version. This required cutting a new hole in the 960 tube, welding the 850 return pipe on and capping the old tube.

Crankcase Ventilation - The intake side 960 motor mount interferes with the 850 crankcase breather box. I'm retaining it for simplicity so the top side of the mount has to be notched a little bit. 5 minutes with a cut off wheel solves this.

Firewall Clearance - The five cylinder comes stock in FWD trim with quite a bit of stuff attached to the back of the head. When installing the engine in a 240 the firewall clearance is fairly tight. The 3rd engine mount bracket can be removed and tossed outright, heater hoses and other stuff can just be moved out of the way and routed elsewhere. The biggest item hanging off the back of the head is the distributor. I haven't tackled this problem yet, but the plan is to make a bracket out of sheet metal and install the distributor in front of one of the cam gears. If I do this, the distributor will in effect be turning backwards, so the spark plug wires have to be installed in backwards order. A more permanent solution is to notch out the firewall and run the distro in the stock position. Once again, a standalone EMS will alleviate this problem in conjunction with '99 and newer coil on plug coils with built in ignitors.

Transmission - There are several choices here, depending on how much money you want to spend and what you prefer to use:

Automatic - This is, mechanically, the simplest alternative. The 960 auto box bolts right up and parts are very common. The electronics are trickier. Theoretically, all the 850 hardware should plug right in and work plug and play. This is uncomfirmed though. If you want to be crazy insane do what Chris Wiita did on his turbo 960 and ditch the TCU for paddle shifters.

Stickshift - The easiest alternative is a 5 speed Volvo M90 box from a 960. These are not available stateside whatsoever and will run you roughly $1000 or more shipped from across the pond. The easier alternative is to use the removable bellhousing from the 960 automatic and buy an adapter plate which mates up to many commonly available yank transmissions. I am using a Tremec World Class T5 from an older mustang. It has a 330ft/lb torque rating and will hold up very well. They go for around $200 on eBay and will shift nice and smooth with an aftermarket shifter. Another option is the tremec TKO 500/600. The numbers designate their respective torque ratings, and with a low displacement engine like the five cylinder they are nearly guaranteed to never break, regrdless of how hard you shift. The adapter plate can be had from Travis Kijowski (BrickPilot on the board).

Regardless of which transmission you choose, the transmission crossmember will have to be fabricated. A good way to make one is described in detail in Doug's T5 swap thread.

Clutch - The simplest solution is to get a flywheel from a manual whiteblock and buy a turbo spec clutch kit from a company like Spec Clutches. My clutch situation is already solved with an aftermarket unit and thusly I am not well versed in what works with what as far as stock replacement clutches go. Fred's article on the M90 has a ton of great info regarding stock upgrades.

Clutch release - the 960 bellhousing does not have a pivot point for a clutch fork or any kind of external mount for either a cable or a slave cylinder. The most practical solution is to use a Tilton or Quartermaster hydraulic release bearing that fits over the input shaft. If you buy an adapter plate from Travis, he can drill any kind of hydraulic release bolt pattern into the adapter for you.

Clutch Master Cylinder - The drivers side firewall plate already has a cutout for a clutch master cylinder. The bolt pattern is almost the same as the most common Tilton and Wilwood master cylinders. Making a small plate to adapt the pattern is quite simple.

Pedal Box - You need to modify the clutch pedal to push on the master cylinder instead of pull on a cable. NOTE: This may not make sense just reading it, but if you study the pedal box it will become apparent what I am talking about. If you look at the pedal box, there are already two holes above where the pedal currently pivots, relocating the pedal there puts the pivot in the right place. Next you need to cut the tab off the pivot shaft, flip it so it sits underneath the shaft instead of on top, and weld it back in place. All this solves the pushing and pulling problem, but since you move the pedal up about 3" it will make the pedal much too short. Unless you wear size 16 shoes, the pedal needs to be cut, lengthened and welded back together to put it in the right place.

PLEASE NOTE: The above two points are made moot if you can find a clutch pedal assembly out of a manual 260. They all came with a hydraulic clutch system.


Driveshaft
- A custom driveshaft is needed. A local shop should be able to do this for roughly $150-$300.

Miscellaneous Information:

Six Cylinder Mounting - Initially it may seem that swapping in a Six cylinder is easier than a five cylinder since basically no shortening has to be done to 960 parts. This holds true if the normally aspirated b6304 960 engine is used. However, if you chose to use the more desirable 272bhp twin turbo T6 engine that came in the S80 T6 you will run into turbo clearance issues with the - comparetively - massive 960 engine mounts. They take up a lot of space, especially on the exhaust side where engine bay room is at a premium on 240's. The turbos are mounted low down on the standard T6 headers and there simply is no room for them (unless of course you make your own engine mounts).

Clearance up front becomes a problem with the longer straight six, especially if you want a large intercooler and air conditioning. An electric fan mounted all the way up front pushing air may be necessary if clearance is tight.

Four Cylinder Mounting - Holy crap, you can't seriously be considering a four cylinder whiteblock? This is engine came in the first generation S40 which didn't sell too well in the states, so finding an engine may be tricky. The most interesting engines are either the low pressure turbo 1.9T or the high pressure turbo T4. If you are crazy enough to do it (you've got to be bat **** insane), there are a few things to consider. The 960 oil pan becomes extremely short at this point so it could be easier to notch the four cylinder pan for cross member clearance. Plus the sump in the 960 pan is pretty damn big - so big in fact that it would be unnecessarily big on a dinky little 2.0l 4 cyl.

I have never actually seen a four cylinder whiteblock in person so I can't say if they have provisions for 960 engine mounts. I want to say yes, but I'm not certain.

Cooling System Revision - I have pictures and information of this that I will add in a few days. It is interesting stuff to know, so stay tuned.

Last edited by Alex Buchka; 03-04-2009 at 02:54 AM..
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Old 04-08-2007, 09:55 PM   #2
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Not bad few suggestions:

1. Oil pan and transmission adapters can be purchased from "brickpilot" on this forum
2. An aftermarket EMS running individual coil on plug type ignition will solve your firewall clearance issues. There are a couple of systems that will have good T5 swap support soon over the next few months (Wolf V500, 034efi).
2.5: IF you must run Motronic, any Automatic turbo ECU can be reflashed by places like iPd, RICA ect as a MT ecu. Its what alot of us 5-speeders do. This DOES work just fine. You will need the complete harness from the speedometer to the engine to make the ECU happy though

3. 850 NA flywheel + 850R clutch is a cheap setup for people using the M90.
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Old 04-08-2007, 10:02 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hank Scorpio View Post
Not bad few suggestions:

1. Oil pan and transmission adapters can be purchased from "brickpilot" on this forum
2. An aftermarket EMS running individual coil on plug type ignition will solve your firewall clearance issues. There are a couple of systems that will have good T5 swap support soon over the next few months (Wolf V500, 034efi).
2.5: IF you must run Motronic, any Automatic turbo ECU can be reflashed by places like iPd, RICA ect as a MT ecu. Its what alot of us 5-speeders do. This DOES work just fine. You will need the complete harness from the speedometer to the engine to make the ECU happy though

3. 850 NA flywheel + 850R clutch is a cheap setup for people using the M90.
I just read it over again and I can't believe I wrote all that. Boredom is a hell of a motivator

I'll add that in, plus some other 260 hydraulic master cylinder stuff Eric chimed in with.
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Old 04-08-2007, 10:11 PM   #4
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will 960 mounts get a white block into a 700?
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Old 04-08-2007, 10:19 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by benflynn View Post
will 960 mounts get a white block into a 700?
My research has led me to believe a whiteblock will literally bolt right into a 700. Apparently the 960 lower mounts just bolt right in with correct spacing and everything.
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Old 04-08-2007, 10:24 PM   #6
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so just regular swapp stuff like a new intake mani and figure out the volvo 5cy cop msns problem......and i guess the tranny could be persuaded
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Old 04-09-2007, 01:18 PM   #7
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edit.

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Old 04-09-2007, 07:02 PM   #8
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so is all this info transferrable to a 700 series? Could you get away with an m46 at first (budget....)?
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Old 04-09-2007, 09:15 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Krepotkin View Post
so is all this info transferrable to a 700 series? Could you get away with an m46 at first (budget....)?
Sort of, and no. The different stuff is engine mounts, but everything else basically translates. An m46 will not fit at all. The ONLY straight bolt on manual transmission is a whiteblock m90. Other transmissions bolt on with Travis' (BrickPilot) adapter plate.

If you are on a budget, don't attempt this swap. Take the time to collect all the parts and figure out what you are doing. This guide will help but I can't cover every single base and every little part you need.
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Old 04-10-2007, 01:28 AM   #10
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Great writeup!
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Old 04-10-2007, 03:54 AM   #11
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Lol, why cut the oilpan when you can fit the 260 swaybar??

You can even fit the 24mm one from Whiteline (australian company)

edit: Except if you fit the 5 cyl, doh.. :P
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Old 04-10-2007, 12:25 PM   #12
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great writeup. One day i'd like to do such a swap!
for the clutch setup, some (later?) 240's have all the holes in the firewall and pedal-box to bolt in a 260 pedal + MC. I heard a 700/900 MC doesnt work, but i havent tried it myself.
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Old 04-11-2007, 07:22 AM   #13
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If you want to use an automagic, would the one off a 960 (with the 6cyl whiteblock) fit a 700 car if I, say, wanted to drop a 5cyl turbo off a 850?
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Old 04-11-2007, 10:11 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dalek View Post
If you want to use an automagic, would the one off a 960 (with the 6cyl whiteblock) fit a 700 car if I, say, wanted to drop a 5cyl turbo off a 850?
I've thought about this... you could but you'd probably have to go full manual-matic like Poi's paddle shifters.

Im going to run a 700r4 behind mine.
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Old 04-11-2007, 08:50 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hank Scorpio View Post
I've thought about this... you could but you'd probably have to go full manual-matic like Poi's paddle shifters.

Im going to run a 700r4 behind mine.
You don't think the 850 TCU will connect up and control the 960 auto box? I'm purely speculating here...
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Old 04-12-2007, 04:55 PM   #16
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edit.

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Old 04-12-2007, 06:44 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Buchka View Post
You don't think the 850 TCU will connect up and control the 960 auto box? I'm purely speculating here...
I honestly dont know... it might. I figured use a 960 TCU but the tach signal will be all wrong to it.

Plus honestly, why live with something that shifts at 6000rpm? booooring. BTW if your going MT you dont need any TCU at all.
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Old 04-12-2007, 07:55 PM   #18
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why are you guys speculating about doing this in 700?
just buy a 900 with a busted timing belt and swap all the crap you need from the 960 to the b5234T
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Old 04-12-2007, 08:21 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by Gene_Gatech View Post
why are you guys speculating about doing this in 700?
just buy a 900 with a busted timing belt and swap all the crap you need from the 960 to the b5234T
Some people prefer the look of a pre-90 740, some people already have the car and don't want to buy a new one, some people prefer the challenge of fitting an engine in a car which was never sold with it. It could be any number of reasons, I personally could really care less about fitting it into a 700.

In my opinion the car needs to be a 240 or earlier model (140, 120, PV etc.) to make the 5 cylinder swap really special.
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Old 04-12-2007, 11:16 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Buchka View Post
Some people prefer the look of a pre-90 740, some people already have the car and don't want to buy a new one, some people prefer the challenge of fitting an engine in a car which was never sold with it. It could be any number of reasons, I personally could really care less about fitting it into a 700.

In my opinion the car needs to be a 240 or earlier model (140, 120, PV etc.) to make the 5 cylinder swap really special.
i agree. Thats why i was unclear of their goals.

nice write-up btw
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Old 04-13-2007, 12:29 AM   #21
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Nice write up! I am trying to get one of these 5Cyl in a 940 myself. Still have a long way to go but I want to make this point... The 5cyl block from model year 1998 and 1999 will not support the 960 engine mounts. 2 of the bosses are not there on the exhaust side. I do not know when the change happened but I checked against my B5234T and B5254T and the back two bosses on the exhuast side are not there.

Also, it appears that not all 960 pans are created equal. The early one (not sure when the break was) does not have the threaded nipple in the pan but in the block. This could be a problem when it comes to fitting the oil filter. FYI

I am going to try to move the distributor to the front of the engine also. Will see if machine shop can make me up a rotor and cap interface. Not sure how I am going to get attached to the block yet.

Anywho, glück with your project... sounds like you have a good start.
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Old 04-13-2007, 12:42 AM   #22
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For the amount of effort involved in actually fitting the engine and wiring things up,
buy/have an adapter made to fit a reasonable transmission that doesn't need 14 electronic gizmos to even function, and buy a standalone so you can actually set the maps ups they way they ought to be- unless you're trying to deal with Nazi Environmental laws or something. In which case good luck.

Have you driven the car much with those mounts? My original design was similar (2"x3"x1/8" structural square tube welded to the bottom of the framerails) but I decided there just was enough weld attaching it to the car for something that will see north of 400hp.

The new design is more like a platform at the bottom of a sheetmetal "rib" that runs up the side of the engine bay. I should probably start a project thread. I have been promising to do so once I finish up the 8.8 swap...

Anyways wicked info. It certainly a major undertaking to actually take the time to SHARE info, so I'm sure I can speak for all when I say thanks! I have a really hard time actually posting updates while I am in the middle of a project.
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Old 04-13-2007, 12:44 PM   #23
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Thanks for the kind words guys, it's nice to know my effort is appreciated. I had to search high and low for a long time to figure out all the stuff I know about this swap and I think it's crazy for someone to have to start all over again. T-bricks is here so we can share information and learn. Another reason I wrote this is because I want to see more whiteblock powered cars! We need to prove to all these stone age redblock nancys that newfangled tech is the way to go

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Originally Posted by Captain Bondo View Post
For the amount of effort involved in actually fitting the engine and wiring things up,
buy/have an adapter made to fit a reasonable transmission that doesn't need 14 electronic gizmos to even function, and buy a standalone so you can actually set the maps ups they way they ought to be- unless you're trying to deal with Nazi Environmental laws or something. In which case good luck.

Have you driven the car much with those mounts? My original design was similar (2"x3"x1/8" structural square tube welded to the bottom of the framerails) but I decided there just was enough weld attaching it to the car for something that will see north of 400hp.

The new design is more like a platform at the bottom of a sheetmetal "rib" that runs up the side of the engine bay. I should probably start a project thread. I have been promising to do so once I finish up the 8.8 swap...

Anyways wicked info. It certainly a major undertaking to actually take the time to SHARE info, so I'm sure I can speak for all when I say thanks! I have a really hard time actually posting updates while I am in the middle of a project.
I agree 100%. The original plan was to get a stock ECU and drive the car with it for a while but the more I think about it, the less I want to do it. It would cost me at least $700 to get the ECU and chip it to work with the stickshift and the way I see it, it's nuts to spend money on something twice. I have been talking to Doug about the Wolf V500 ECU, it looks EXTREMELY nice and I am basically decided on it. The extra cost over VEMS is well worth it in my opinion.

I would love to see pictures of your mounts, post them up! The car doesn't drive yet, so I can't comment on the durability of the mounts but I will say this; My mounts are basically copied right off a dude's car on TPC. He put down around 450whp last season and will be making considerably more this time around, so I think I'm safe.

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Originally Posted by JT
Nice write up! I am trying to get one of these 5Cyl in a 940 myself. Still have a long way to go but I want to make this point... The 5cyl block from model year 1998 and 1999 will not support the 960 engine mounts. 2 of the bosses are not there on the exhaust side. I do not know when the change happened but I checked against my B5234T and B5254T and the back two bosses on the exhuast side are not there.

Also, it appears that not all 960 pans are created equal. The early one (not sure when the break was) does not have the threaded nipple in the pan but in the block. This could be a problem when it comes to fitting the oil filter. FYI

I am going to try to move the distributor to the front of the engine also. Will see if machine shop can make me up a rotor and cap interface. Not sure how I am going to get attached to the block yet.

Anywho, glück with your project... sounds like you have a good start.
Thanks! I will take a note of all this in the writeup. I had no idea the bosses were gone in later engines. I've seen people using 960 mounts with the R engines so I assumed the bosses were there on all whiteblocks. Maybe it's an isolated incident on only certain model year castings?

I have also heard about the oil filter boss, I was under the impression only the euro 2.5 liter engines had this issue. Now that I think about it, the 2.5l six cylinder pans have a nipple, but it's not threaded. I'm sure that's what I was thinking about. I will add a notice for people to keep this in mind when looking for a pan.
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Old 04-13-2007, 12:52 PM   #24
Mueller
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thanks for the taking the time to document this....this is a swap I'd love to do, but the smog issues I don;t like and the car would have to be a stick and paying $900 to have an ECU flashed is crazy if I couldn;t find the correct ECU


does anyone have the weight of a 5cyl whiteblock longblock assembly?

I know the block is aluminum which would save weight over a redblock, but the additional cam and related stuff as well as the extra cylinder might cancel any real weight benifit of the whiteblock....not that it's a big deal for a street car, just thinking outloud
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Old 04-13-2007, 01:44 PM   #25
Alex Buchka
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mueller View Post
thanks for the taking the time to document this....this is a swap I'd love to do, but the smog issues I don;t like and the car would have to be a stick and paying $900 to have an ECU flashed is crazy if I couldn;t find the correct ECU


does anyone have the weight of a 5cyl whiteblock longblock assembly?

I know the block is aluminum which would save weight over a redblock, but the additional cam and related stuff as well as the extra cylinder might cancel any real weight benifit of the whiteblock....not that it's a big deal for a street car, just thinking outloud
In the Peoples Republik of Kommiefornia where smog is a huge deal, a five cylinder swap is actually ideal. Since you are swapping a newer engine into an older car there should really be no issues. A chipped stock ECU will give you a healthy performance boost and coupled with a high flow cat you should be able to pass the sniffer test with no problems at all.

The listed weight of a B5234T out of an 850 or S70 Turbo with all accessories, oil, and coolant is slightly under 190kg (410lb). The weight is about equal to a complete redblock but the stock horsepower is much improved.
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