View Single Post
Old 04-16-2021, 11:39 AM   #24
spock345
Board Member
 
spock345's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by 84B23F View Post

Brake Line History

A little history- Before WWII, many manufacturers used copper brake lines. Copper is both easy to form, and resists corrosion well. Unfortunately, copper is also prone to cracking. Shortly before the war, there was a transition to steel tubing for brake lines. Steel did not have the cracking problem of copper, but it did corrode. Steel brake lines would often fail after only a few years of use. The options to prolong the life of steel brake lines included many types of coatings to protect against corrosion.

Steel brake lines failing due to corrosion was not acceptable to safety obsessed Sweden. Both Saab and Volvo experimented with epoxy coatings, anodized steel and various other coatings to protect the brake lines. Volvo introduced a new type of brake line in 1976. This new brake line consisted of 89% Copper, 1% Iron, and 10% Nickel. This alloy proved to be durable with the corrosion resistance of copper and the crack resistance of steel.
I assume this sort of brake line is similar to the cupro-nickel line you can buy pretty much anywhere now?
__________________
1967 122s, B20F, M40
1989 240 B230F (V15 cam, chipped EZK), M47 (Lost a fight with a Chevy express van)
2012 VW Tiguan 6 speed auto (oh the joys of carbon buildup).
spock345 is offline   Reply With Quote