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Old 07-18-2020, 02:49 PM   #1
PDX245T
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Default Broken exhaust studs.

My b21ft has had three broken studs for a while. I have an extra 398 head that is sitting on the shelf. Does it make more sense to swap the heads instead of trying to get the broken ones out and hope that the other ones donít break too? The motor has 260,000 on it.
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Old 07-18-2020, 03:15 PM   #2
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Replacing a head is a bit time consuming so there is that.

Me, I'd try to repair the broken studs with the head still in place if possible, and if that works then try to remove and replace the remaining intact ones as well.


Use lots of penetrating fluid and give it time to penetrate / work.

If it fails then yeah, yank the old head and replace it with the spare.
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Old 07-18-2020, 03:36 PM   #3
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That said, it really isn't much worse than removing the turbo and extracting the old studs, installing time-serts, then new studs. If the replacement head has small coolant passages and the current head has big coolant passages, then I would definitely get a gasket set and just swap it. Maybe have someone freshen up the replacement head, while you're at it.
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Old 07-18-2020, 03:47 PM   #4
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Both heads are 398. I took the extra head to the machine shop shortly after I bought it and had it checked for warpage, so it should be ready to drop in. Since I have no records, I have no idea if the head gasket was ever done, which it probably hasnít.
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Old 07-18-2020, 05:25 PM   #5
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I would try and extract the broken one first. Try all the trick, heat, ez out, pb blaster etc. If no luck pull it. Im guessing they are broke off flush? Take your time at it and be patient. So far Ive done 3 heads for friends and was able to extract them all. They couldnt believe it. They will come out. Use good and right fasteners to put back together.
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Old 07-19-2020, 10:23 PM   #6
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Pull the head. Then pick the one to fix up to put back on. It's not a bad job to go a bit further to remove the head. Then you have much better access to repair the studs. Besides an engine with 260k miles on it is going to need a head gasket in the near future. So pulling the head to better fix the studs will let you take care of that.
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Old 07-21-2020, 10:05 PM   #7
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My favorite way to remove broken bolts/ studs is to take a nut, clean off the zinc coating and mig weld it to whatever is left of the bolt. The heat helps to free up the bolt and you can just use a wrench. Sometimes it takes a couple of tries so have couple of nuts prepped. I use muriatic acid to remove the plating. Itís the stuff you use in pools. Just take a wire and dunk it in for a minute or two. Rinse, dry, and weld.
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Old 07-21-2020, 10:10 PM   #8
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I got a trick for removing pilot bearings using newspaper..
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Old 07-21-2020, 11:58 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TimS View Post
I got a trick for removing pilot bearings using newspaper..
Probably the same trick as using grease.
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Old 07-22-2020, 01:55 PM   #10
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I've had pilot bearings stuck so bad the grease wouldn't push it out. I bought a puller tool that works great. It's a common bearing 6202 RS is a good version.

I've used the welding method. i posted it here years ago. it has even worked if the broken piece is below the surface.
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Old 07-22-2020, 02:03 PM   #11
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I've had good luck with welding a nut to the broken stud, some times it takes a couple of tries, yes the heat can make it free up. If you are doing this with the head on it can be tricky. Some heat may help, but you might end up gauling the threads, as the stud pulls the aluminum with it
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