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Old 01-18-2021, 08:29 PM   #1
BeaverMeat
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Default Undercoat “repair”

Does anyone know what type of undercoat was most likely used on 1990 cars? Factory or dealer installed. Asphalt or rubber based?

The undercoat on my ‘90 240 axle is still in decent shape just missing some spots here and there. Wanting to patch it and use appropriate coating so it will bond properly.

Any insight?

Or should I just degrease it, rattle can it, and call it a day. lol
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Old 01-18-2021, 09:16 PM   #2
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For undercoat I like to use the stuff by Wurth. It's simliar or the same as what Euro car makers used. There is also good stuff from 3M. They make this stuff called body schutz which is what they use to protect the rocker panels.
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Old 01-19-2021, 09:05 PM   #3
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Good to know. Problem I’m finding is I can’t get small quantities.
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Old 01-20-2021, 11:12 AM   #4
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Good to know. Problem I’m finding is I can’t get small quantities.
https://www.amazon.ca/Wurth-High-Bui...1155477&sr=8-1

This looks to fit the bill. I am doing small patch panels on floor plans and was also looking to see what I could use. It has good reviews. Worth trying out.
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Old 01-20-2021, 03:35 PM   #5
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This is good stuff too, bit less easy to apply: http://fluidfilm.de/en/datenblaetter/

Think it is available in the USA but the uber smart search engine I'm using does not want to display suppliers outside of EU, ugh.

Foam paint roller makes easy work of large surfaces.
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Old 01-20-2021, 03:37 PM   #6
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Wire brush & some spray on undercoating, don't over think it.
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Old 01-20-2021, 03:43 PM   #7
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^^ No kidding. The stuff Volvo used was pure tar. Not a rubberized formula such as those available today. Go to any auto parts store and pick up any one of the spray can undercoats they have on the shelf.
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Old 01-20-2021, 06:20 PM   #8
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Both the Wurth stuff and Body Shutz were available in spray cans.
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Old 01-20-2021, 11:23 PM   #9
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^^ No kidding. The stuff Volvo used was pure tar. Not a rubberized formula such as those available today. Go to any auto parts store and pick up any one of the spray can undercoats they have on the shelf.
No kidding. Definitely wear gloves when you change your fuel filter on an under coated car. Made that mistake once and my hands were sticky and stained rootbeer color for a week.
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Old 01-22-2021, 11:08 AM   #10
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No kidding. Definitely wear gloves when you change your fuel filter on an under coated car. Made that mistake once and my hands were sticky and stained rootbeer color for a week.
A lil naphtha on a rag takes it right off. So does gasoline or diesel, like dissolves like. Depends on your tolerance for chemical exposure, the older I get the more I avoid it.
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Old 01-22-2021, 11:20 AM   #11
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No kidding. Definitely wear gloves when you change your fuel filter on an under coated car. Made that mistake once and my hands were sticky and stained rootbeer color for a week.
Ha! I spent WEEKS soaked in that stuff ten years ago when I stripped my car down. Scraped every last inch of that stuff by hand. I stank of it.

Kerosene is best. It's much cleaner to work with than diesel. I put it in a spray bottle, soak a section down, and scrape away.
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Old 01-22-2021, 04:16 PM   #12
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I think John V once recommended freezing it with liquid nitrogen and then scraping it off.
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Old 01-22-2021, 04:22 PM   #13
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Dry ice. I've heard of using that from several different sources to remove the under coat from sheet metal.
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Old 01-22-2021, 05:05 PM   #14
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Ha! I spent WEEKS soaked in that stuff ten years ago when I stripped my car down. Scraped every last inch of that stuff by hand. I stank of it.

Kerosene is best. It's much cleaner to work with than diesel. I put it in a spray bottle, soak a section down, and scrape away.
^ This after a gentle heat gunning and scraping most all of it off with a 1" putty knife.
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Old 01-22-2021, 06:03 PM   #15
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^ This after a gentle heat gunning and scraping most all of it off with a 1" putty knife.
The little oscillating scrapers work wonders on this as well.
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Old 01-22-2021, 07:07 PM   #16
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I tried all of the above on my 142. What really worked was a pneumatic undercoat removal tool. I literally f'd with that crap for weeks before getting one. After getting that I was finished in days.
Not going to lie, it creates a hell of a mess. But no nasty chemicals to deal with, no smells. Still need a respirator so you aren't breathing any debris.
Here's a link to one on Eastwood. I got mine on Amazon, but can't find it now.
https://www.eastwood.com/eastwood-pn...oval-tool.html
Then I cleaned everything with lacquer thinner and sprayed it with Eastwood After Blast. No rust after 2 years, since I haven't worked on it much lately.

Last edited by sksmith; 01-22-2021 at 07:16 PM..
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Old 01-25-2021, 04:36 PM   #17
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The little oscillating scrapers work wonders on this as well.
My car was like a mixed bag, some of it was dry, some of it was still gooey tar. The dried out stuff I made tracks with my little harbor freight pneumatic scraper. A needle scaler was also good for breaking it out of corners and folds up around the rear mounting points. The stuff that's still alive and gooey really needed the solvent to get moving.
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Old 01-25-2021, 05:25 PM   #18
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If it's soft, you're doomed. I wonder if an angle grinder and wire brush with a cheap-o router speed controller would work like the pro-tools.
The slow die grinder thing is sweet, but i'd really have to try one before dropping that amount of money on a tool. But hey, maybe I'd find more uses for it.
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Old 01-25-2021, 06:30 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by culberro View Post
If it's soft, you're doomed. I wonder if an angle grinder and wire brush with a cheap-o router speed controller would work like the pro-tools.
The slow die grinder thing is sweet, but i'd really have to try one before dropping that amount of money on a tool. But hey, maybe I'd find more uses for it.
I just kept finding any sort of "bristle" was just spreading the soft stuff around and loading itself up.
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Old 01-25-2021, 10:08 PM   #20
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I also used a needle scaler for some tight spaces.
For the most part, mine was dry. Only area that was gooey was the transmission tunnel. For it, I was able to wipe it off with lacquer thinner.
But that grinder like tool really did the trick.
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Old 01-26-2021, 05:29 PM   #21
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The John V method was to use liquid nitrogen to freeze the undercoat, then one could chip/ scrape/ hammer it off. There was some sorta gun ("death ray") that was sent around the rally anarchy forum members.

Rubberized undercoating is dangerous stuff. Around here, at least, it'll trap water and salt against the body and rust it out. Oil/wax is the only way if you are trying to prevent winter corrosion.
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Old 01-27-2021, 03:04 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Redwood Chair View Post
Wire brush & some spray on undercoating, don't over think it.
Overthinking is what I do...

It’s soft. I have the axle on jack stands and it’s scraping off when I rotate it.

I have an oscillating tool so I think I’ll use that to scrape it off, brush the rust off, paint, and apply undercoat... POR15 perhaps.

Last edited by BeaverMeat; 01-27-2021 at 03:12 AM..
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Old 01-27-2021, 04:35 AM   #23
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What I have used;
Heat gun
Scrapers/ chisels
Air powered scraper
Elect drill with wire brushes some are with plastic embeded wire
Elbow grease.
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Old 02-05-2021, 04:50 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Redwood Chair View Post
Wire brush & some spray on undercoating, don't over think it.
^^ You were talking about the axle

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